A newsletter for faculty and staff of California Baptist University

September 19, 2014

DCIM112GOPRO Processed with VSCOcam with k2 preset

In this issue…

Current News

9-11 terrorist attack remembrance nets unique photo

DCIM112GOPRO Processed with VSCOcam with k2 presetA California Baptist University event honoring victims of the 9/11 terrorist attack resulted in a stunning image that inspired Spencer Findley, a CBU film major.

During the day, students, faculty and staff took one of 2,977 flags, one for each victim of the terrorist attack, and placed the flag in the lawn of the Stamps Courtyard. Names of the victims were listed on nearby posters, and each name was on a piece of paper for participants to take with them. The event was sponsored by the Associated Students of California Baptist University.

At the end of the day, all the flags formed a large cross, which was lit at its edges to stand out as the sun set. Findlay used a drone to photograph the scene.

“After hearing about the 9/11 remembrance event and hearing there would be a large cross made up of flags, I immediately thought of capturing the cross from the sky,” he said. “I own a drone and this was a perfect opportunity to use it and capture a very unique image.”

Trent Ward, ASCBU executive president and a marketing senior, came up with the idea of the event, which is in its inaugural year. He hopes that it becomes a tradition.

“I want us to be a socially responsible student body, a pro-active student body,” he said. “This is another opportunity for students to express themselves.”

Jason Navarro, a kinesiology senior, placed a flag because he felt it was important to remember everyone who was lost. He was in sixth grade, and although he remembers the events, he did not understand everything that was happening.

“It’s important to let us know what we’ve risen from, how even in the darkest times, there is hope for the future,” he said.

 

CBU Marine candidate captures top fitness award

Daniel Urban

Daniel Urban

California Baptist University students do a variety of things on their summer break: get a job, travel, hang out.

But Daniel Urban spent six weeks at the U.S. Marine Corps Officer Candidates School in Quantico, Va., and received an award for the top physical fitness candidate in his company.

Urban, an officer candidate and a CBU junior, is studying flight aviation and is a member of the varsity wrestling team. He hopes to be a pilot in the Marines.

“I wanted to be part of something that was bigger than me,” he said. “I think the military is great, that whole mentality, the lifestyle, that’s something I’ve always been attracted to.

At the candidates school, studentswere evaluated on their academics, physical fitness and leadership potential. The normal day began at 5 a.m. and ended at 9 p.m., and included physical fitness and classes on Marine Corps history, military skills, ethics and leadership.

For Urban, the toughest part was lack of sleep. Although they had eight hours of free time each night, the students also had to study and do other tasks during those hours.

“That was one of the tougher parts for me, being able to set aside time to study, when I would love to be sleeping,” he said

In order to be a top physical candidate, candidates had to perform well on the physical fitness test (which includes 20 pull-ups and a 3-mile timed run in 18 minutes or less), the combat fitness test (which includes a sprint and carrying and lifting 30-pound ammo cans), the obstacle course, and 4-6 mile conditioning hikes with 45-60 pound hiking packs. Urban had a perfect score on the physical and combat fitness test, and the top score on the obstacle course.

“I just like to work out in general, so I’m always trying to challenge myself, doing new things, trying to lift more, trying to run further, trying to run faster, always trying to keep that mentality,” Urban said.

Capt. Joshua P. Roberts is the USMC Officer Selection Officer Riverside.

“Urban is our all-around most physically fit candidate, but beyond that, he is extremely intelligent,” Roberts said. “He is always professional, enjoys a challenge, and has exceptional time management skills. Urban is a great representative of the quality of student that CBU produces. I only wish I had more candidates like him, as my job would be much easier.”

 

Coach Rick Rowland wins 500th game with the Lancers

Coach Rick Rowland

Coach Rick Rowland

Rick Rowland has spent the past 16 years of his life coaching water polo at California Baptist University. The Lancers leader is known as much by his success as his longevity, perhaps that was never clearer than Sept. 13 when Rowland won his 500th game with CBU.

Ironically enough, after all the games Rowland has coached at the Lancer Aquatics Center, his 500th win came not only on the road but on an entirely different coast, as CBU was competing in Brown University’s Bruno Fall Classic. The Lancers defeated St. Francis 10-6 in their second contest Saturday to usher in the milestone, which also includes Rowland’s wins with the women’s water polo team.

 

 

 Astronaut inspires CBU students to shoot for the stars

Hilmers (2)

Dr. David C. Hilmers

“If you love something, you’re going to do better at it,” Dr. David C. Hilmers told students at California Baptist University. “Find something you are passionate about and work at it as if you’re working for the Lord, not yourself.”

California Baptist University’s College of Allied Health hosted Hilmers on Sept. 15 to kick off its Distinguished Lecture Series. Hilmers is an associate professor at the Department of Internal Medicine and Pediatrics Center for Space Medicine at Baylor College of Medicine. His topic was “To Outer Space and Back: A Doctor’s View of Global Health.”

Hilmers, also a former NASA astronaut on four space shuttle missions, talked about the importance of healthcare globally, not just domestically.

“I think you become more complete as a doctor by going and serving in places you don’t feel comfortable,” he said. “In a place where you don’t have many fancy tests, you really have to rely on your skills.”

Hilmers has volunteered medical aid in more than 40 countries to combat malaria, hepatitis and malnutrition.

“Every medical provider should do a mission trip,” he said. “It will make them a better doctor.”

Prior to his work as a medical provider, Hilmers was a Marine Corps colonel, aviator and electrical engineer and a NASA astronaut.

Although he had a fulfilling career as a marine and astronaut, Hilmers wanted to pursue his childhood dream of becoming a medical practitioner. So, at the age of 42, Hilmers enrolled in medical school at Baylor College of Medicine, working as an astronaut during the day and taking classes during the night. Hilmers was training for his final trip into space aboard the space shuttle Discovery in 1992.

“I finished my classes about two weeks before the start of the mission,” he said.

Following his final mission to space and after fulfilling his goal of becoming a doctor, Hilmers stayed on staff as a faculty member of Baylor College of Medicine.

“The next part of my life began as God told me it was time for me to live out my childhood dream,” he said.

 

New dining options provide students more choices, flexibility

dining

El Monte Grill is one of three new dining options on CBU’s campus.

The addition of new dining facilities at California Baptist University this fall means not only increased food options but also greater flexibility for students.

El Monte Grill and Chick-fil-A, both opened since last month, provide two more options for campus dining. The new Campus Xpress (CX) convenience story is also open for those who want to grab a quick bite to eat. The facilities, along with Wanda’s Place, Brisco’s Café and the Alumni Dining Commons (ADC), are operated by Provider Food Services.

“It gives students more flexibility,” said Kipp Dougherty, director of food services. “As the campus expands and grows, depending upon where they live, where their classes are, what their other activities are, they now have many options all over campus where they can get food.”

Senior Kayla North said she likes the variety the two new restaurants offer without having to go off campus. Junior Yaritza Salas said she frequents El Monte because of its convenience because she spends a lot time in that area of the campus. Junior Rachelle Hardin said having more options mean students won’t tire of the same food. Sophomore Bryce Hargis also liked having the nutritional information that Chick-fil-A offers, since it is a national chain.

Because there are more dining options available for students, the ADC is closed Friday nights and all day Saturday. For the first time, however, Brisco’s Café is open for breakfast seven days a week.

“Because we have a large residential population on that side of the campus, we felt that those students were being underserved having to come all the way to the ADC,” Dougherty said. “It’s a convenience for students. We now have both locations where they can eat.”

This year, the students also have Dining Dollars in addition to their meal swipes. If they just want a smoothie, a coffee or snack, they can use their Dining Dollars, Dougherty said.

“They have more options than they ever had, which is a great thing,” she said.

Meal Service Hours

Chick-fil-A and El Monte Grill

10 a.m.-8 p.m. Monday-Thursday

10 a.m-7 p.m. Friday-Saturday

Closed Sunday

Brisco’s:

7:30 a.m.-11 p.m. Monday-Friday

7:30 a.m.-10:30 p.m. Saturday-Sunday

Wanda’s:

7 a.m.-9 p.m. Monday-Thursday

7 a.m.-7 p.m. Friday

8 a.m.-7 p.m. Saturday

Closed Sunday

CX:

7 a.m.-8 p.m. Monday-Thursday

7 a.m.-7 p.m. Friday

8 a.m.-7 p.m. Saturday

Closed Sunday

ADC:

7-10 a.m. breakfast; 10:30 a.m.-2 p.m. lunch; 4:30-7 p.m. dinner Monday-Friday

Closed Saturday

9:15 a.m.-2 p.m. brunch; 5-6:30 p.m. dinner Sunday

 

CBU advances in 2015 “Best Regional Universities” rankings

2014-08-26-Veneman-Yeager Center-0004U.S. News & World Report has included California Baptist University on its list of the nation’s “Best Colleges” for the ninth straight year. CBU is ranked No. 38 in the West in the publication’s “Best Regional Universities” category for 2015, up from No. 42 in the previous year’s rankings and No.58 in 2013.

The ranking places CBU in the top tier of educational institutions across the nation.

“This year’s ranking once again reflects the improvement in quality that California Baptist University continually strives to provide in order to enhance students’ overall experience,” said Dr. Ronald L. Ellis, CBU president. “Being named a ‘Best Regional University’ in this influential ranking affirms California Baptist University for the value of the educational and related opportunities it offers and also serves to validate the choice that students make to attend CBU.”

‘Best Colleges’ rankings are featured in U.S. News & World Report each year to aid prospective students and their parents looking for the best academic values for their money. Now in its 30th year, the annual comparative listing uses a quantitative system of 16 weighted indicators of academic excellence to rank universities. Those indicators include: student selectivity, retention and graduation rates; assessment by peer institutions; faculty resources; financial resources and alumni giving.

For 2015, the category of Best Regional Universities includes 620 institutions that offer a broad scope of undergraduate degrees and master’s degrees but few, if any, doctoral programs. A full list of the rankings can be viewed at www.usnews.com/colleges.

 

Open house showcases new features in Lancer Plaza North

Lancer PlazaCalifornia Baptist University’s Lancer Plaza North opened this fall with a brand new look and welcomed students and other visitors during an open house on Sept. 5.

Before CBU acquired the 11-acre property in 2006, restaurants and retail stores occupied the shopping center that was known as Adams Plaza. Today, as an integral new part of the CBU campus, the facility offers space for university offices, student areas and a popular new dining facility.

The new occupants are Office of Spiritual Life, Community Life Office, Campus Store, Office of Leadership and Transitions and the Associated Students of California Baptist University (ASCBU). El Monte Grill, a Mexican-themed restaurant, is also located there. The offices recently celebrated the move with a grand opening.

What do the occupants enjoy most about their new location? Space.

“We love everything, the space, the storage room,” said Heather Hubbert, assistant dean of students in the Office of Leadership and Transitions.

“It’s so big, there’s room for meetings and for students to come in,” said Taylor Rilling, graduate assistant for ASCBU.

Most offices housed in the new Lancer Plaza locations moved from the Yeager Center, some from more than one location. The new offices have room for storage, room to grow and for some, the staff is now in one location.

“It’s the first time I’ve been with my staff,” said Chris Hofschroer, assistant dean of students in Community Life. Hofschroer enjoys having staff, storage and recreation rental items all in one location that includes a lounge furnished with Ping-Pong tables and sofas where students can hang out.

“It’s warm and inviting,” he said. “Our students are realizing that.”

Components of the Office of Spiritual Life (OSL) used to be located in four different offices. John Montgomery appreciates having all the staff in one location.

“Having a ‘one-stop’ location for all ministry areas of OSL should make it easier for students to find us,” he said.

Office of Leadership and Transitions was formerly the Campus Life Office. It split into the Office of Leadership and Transitions and University Card Services, which remains in the Yeager Center. The function of the Office of Leadership includes new student orientation, student leadership and the FOCUS (First-year Orientation & Christian University Success) program.

“We love the community,” Hubbert said, referring to the other offices in the complex. “We love having the space for students to visit.”

 

CBU alumni teaching around the world

Top (from left): Jordan Martinez, Mathew Shade, Ryan Atkins, Daniel Rodriguez, Sam Anich; 2nd row: Lauren Whitlock, Laura Waterbury, Ryan Corbin, Wiley Snedeker; 3rd row: Cassandra Kitchen, Joelle Tajima, Katelyn Schwab, Sierra Van Leeuwen; Bottom row: Nicole Jessen Shade, Renee Flannery and Christopher Kyle

Top (from left): Jordan Martinez, Mathew Shade, Ryan Atkins, Daniel Rodriguez, Sam Anich; 2nd row: Lauren Whitlock, Laura Waterbury, Ryan Corbin, Wiley Snedeker; 3rd row: Cassandra Kitchen, Joelle Tajima, Katelyn Schwab, Sierra Van Leeuwen; Bottom row: Nicole Jessen Shade, Renee Flannery and Christopher Kyle

Last year, California Baptist University sent five alumni to teach English at a university in China. This year, 16 are going to China and Japan.

The Teach Abroad Program (TAP) is operated through the Global Initiatives office. Bryan Davis, director of the International Center, said the program has two missions: first, it is designed to help CBU build stronger partnerships with overseas institutions; and second, it helps CBU alumni who want to teach overseas.

“We’ve learned that many CBU students that are looking to teach overseas after graduation to get some experience or because they want to go overseas long term,” Davis said. “We thought, why allow them to continue to go through other placement agencies when we can build a process here for them to teach through the university?”

Every applicant needs to be a CBU graduate, hold a bachelor’s degree and commit to at least one teaching overseas. All the participants earn a certificate for Teaching English as a Foreign Language (TEFL). Predictably, the group includes a fair share of English teachers, Davis said, but it also has attracted students with majors such as journalism, criminal justice and mathematics.

“CBU is such a globally minded place,” he said. “Students here have such a passion for intercultural relationships and global work that we see [students from all majors].”

Cassandra Jo Kitchen (’14) graduated with a major in foundational mathematics and will be teaching at a high school in China. While she will be teaching English through TAP, her ultimate goal is teach math.

“I have worries or fears of not reaching my students, getting homesick, eating different foods and not knowing the language, but that is what drives me to go.” she said. “I am so comfortable in my American world that I believe a little discomfort will be good for me.”

CBU provided the group with six weeks of training over the summer including lesson planning, teaching methods and cross-cultural understanding. They also received practical experience while teaching more than 400 international students who came to CBU for language camps.

 

Family Updates

From left: Dr. Ronald L. Ellis and Mark Takano

From left: Dr. Ronald L. Ellis and Mark Takano

Dr. Ronald L. Ellis, CBU president, recently hosted Mark Takano, U.S. Representative for California’s 41st congressional district. It was Takano’s first visit to California Baptist University.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Dr. Grace Ni

Dr. Grace Ni

Dr. Grace Ni, associate professor of electrical and computer engineering, presented a paper titled Analyzing the Nonlinearity of Binary Phase Detector in Phase-Locked Loops at the 2014 IEEE International Symposium on  Radio-Frequency Integration Technology in Hefei, China, Aug. 27-30. The paper was co-authored with Xuelin Xu, principle engineer at Luxtera Inc., who also serves as an industrial curriculum partner to Dr. Ni’s courses in electronics.

 

 

 

 

Face2FaceCBU students were featured in the Southern Baptist International Mission Board’s Commission Stories. The students were part of the IMB’s Face2Face summer program, which sends students overseas for two months of discipleship and ministry. To read the article, click here.

 

 

 

Dr. Mary Ann Pearson

Dr. Mary Ann Pearson

Dr. Patricia Hernandez

Dr. Patricia Hernandez

Dr. Mary Ann Pearson, associate professor of public relations in Online and Professional Studies, presented a webinar for Give Big Riverside County on Pinterest and Instagram Sept. 5. More than 25 attendees from area nonprofits learned how to use these image based social media sites to deliver messages, gain support and raise funds. Also, Dr. Patricia Hernandez, assistant professor of communication in Online and Professional Studies, and Pearson presented a workshop on internships and social media to business owners and nonprofits in downtown Riverside Sept. 9. The meeting promoted the second year of the CBU OPS and Riverside Downtown Partnership internship program. Pearson also wrote an article titled Mentoring Online to Facilitate Internships, which was published in the Sept. 15 issue of Connect, a publication of the International Mentoring Association.

 

Dr. Hyun-Woo Park

Dr. Hyun-Woo Park

Dr. Hyun-Woo Park, professor of biology, co-authored a paper titled Protein crystal structure obtained at 2.9 Å resolution from injecting bacterial cells into an X-ray free-electron laser beam, which was published Sept. 2 in the proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.

 

 

 

 

Dr. Chris Morgan

Dr. Chris Morgan

Dr. Anthony Chute

Dr. Anthony Chute

Dr. Chris Morgan and Dr. Anthony Chute, dean and associate dean of the School of Christian Ministries respectively, recently had three of their books highlighted in Preaching Magazine’s The Preacher’s Guide to Best in Bibles and Bible Reference of 2014. The books included The Community of Jesus: A Theology of the Church (B&H); Fallen: A Theology of Sin (Crossway); and Why We Belong: Evangelical Unity and Denominational Diversity (Crossway).

 

 

 

From left: Dirk Dallas, Dr. Lisa Bursch, Dr. Steve Betts, Dr. Betsy Morris, Dr. Rebecca Meyer, Dr. Carol Minton and Dr. Susan Drummond

From left: Dirk Dallas, Dr. Lisa Bursch, Dr. Steve Betts, Dr. Betsy Morris, Dr. Rebecca Meyer, Dr. Carol Minton and Dr. Susan Drummond

The University Assessment Committee presented its Best Awards for 2013-2014 Sept. 9. Certificates were awarded included Dirk Dallas, College of Architecture, Visual Arts, and Design, Best Rookie Coordinator; Dr. Lisa Bursch, School of Nursing, Best Program Review; Dr. Steve Betts, School of Music, Best College/School Assessment Coordinator; Dr. Betsy Morris, Online and Professional Studies,  Best Overall Assessment Coordinator; Dr. Rebecca Meyer, School of Nursing, Best Program Review,  Dr. Carol Minton, School of Behavioral Sciences, Best Improved Assessment; and Dr. Susan Drummond, School of Nursing, Best Program Review.

Best Awards recognize the excellent work and achievements accomplished by the identified assessment coordinators. Annual assessment and periodic program review are vital processes designed to better serve CBU students by seeking continual improvement in all academic programs.

 

 

Dr. Daniel Prather

Dr. Daniel Prather

Dr. Daniel Prather, chair of the department of aviation science, taught a four-day airport operations course in Nashville, Tenn. to 50 airport professionals on behalf of the American Association of Airport Executives, Aug. 25-28.

 

 

 

 

The department of aviation science welcomed 55 students to campus Sept. 5 during the 2nd Annual Aviation Science Welcome Dinner. Students, faculty and staff were treated to a Q&A session with a panel of aviation industry experts, including pilots from Skywest Airlines and Delta Airlines, the Southwest Airlines manager of dispatch standards, an aviation planner with RBF Consulting and a senior aviation maintenance technician with FedEx. Students Lacey Schimming and Jennifer Endeman were awarded the Aviation Science Chair’s Scholarship.

Students in the department of aviation science produced a video highlighting the very first year of CBU’s aviation science program. To view the video, click here.

 

Dr. Angela Brand

Dr. Angela Brand

Dr. Toni Dingman

Dr. Toni Dingman

Dr. Scott Key

Dr. Scott Key

Dr. Gayne Anacker

Dr. Gayne Anacker

Dr. Gayne Anacker, dean of the College of Arts and Sciences, served as program director for the C.S. Lewis Foundation’s recent C.S. Lewis Summer Institute, which carried the theme Oxbridge 2014–Reclaiming the Virtues: Human Flourishing in the 21st Century. The conference was held July 21-31 in Oxford and Cambridge, England at the University of Oxford and the University of Cambridge. Anacker also served as co-leader for the Great Books Seminar and presented the paper Natural Law and the Recent Turn toward Virtue Ethics in the special session of the Academic Roundtable. Dr. Scott Key, professor of philosophy, served as director of the Academic Roundtable and presented a paper titled Toward an Epistemology of Value: Wisdom and Trust in Aristotle’s Ethics and the Gospel of Mark. Dr. Toni Dingman, associate professor of English, and Dr. Angela Brand, associate professor of music, also presented papers. Dingman’s paper was titled Lewis, the Law of Human Nature and the Crisis of Modern Civility, while Brand presented Research and Presence:  Finding Virtue in Musical Manuscripts.

 

CAHThe College of Allied Health hosted its first Welcome Back Rally on Sept. 4 with more than 650 students, faculty, and staff in attendance. The event was held at the Recreation Center and included faculty introductions, academic information, social media announcements and multiple contests to win a CBU Beach Cruiser, $25 to the Apple Store, and gift cards for on-campus dining. This was a great opportunity for students within the College to connect with their faculty and department chairs, and to meet Clinical Coordinator Lori Torres. The Office of Career Services was also present, providing helpful information to juniors and seniors looking for internship and employment opportunities. Tiffany Hendricks, a freshman, won the CBU Beach Cruiser after competing in a trivia competition and mirror-dance competition.

 

Dr. Monica O'Rourke

Dr. Monica O’Rourke

Dr. Monica O’Rourke, associate professor of kinesiology for Online and Professional Studies, had her theory and research in kinesiology highlighted in a textbook titled Applied Health Fitness Psychology, published by Human Kinetics Publications.  The book includes O’Rourke’s theory of psychological motivation for lifelong fitness and her research of situational factors for exercise.

 

 

 

Dr. Linn Carothers (far right) with students from Notre Dame High School

Dr. Linn Carothers (extreme right) with students from Notre Dame High School

Dr. Linn Carothers, professor of mathematics, and Dr. Ricardo Cordero-Soto, assistant professor of mathematics, have partnered with CBU alumnus Nicholas Janzen ‘12, mathematics teacher at Notre Dame High School, to bring Notre Dame High School students to campus for a Bridge to Supercomputing program. Students will receive instruction in construction and programming of supercomputers, dynamical systems, stochastic processes, computational methods and modeling. Thirteen students attended the first session on Aug. 23.

 

 

 

 

 

Stewart Undem

Stewart Undem

Stewart Undem, adjunct professor of music, recently returned from a summer tour of Australia as lead trombonist in the Glenn Miller Orchestra. The band, one of two licensed in the U.S. by Glenn Miller Products Inc., exclusively travels overseas. The Australian tour included 57 concerts.

 

 

 

 

Dr. Kenneth Minesinger

Dr. Kenneth Minesinger

Dr. Kenneth Minesinger, associate professor of law for Online & Professional Studies, recently edited an article for the State Bar of California’s Business Law News titled Protecting the Tax Refunds of Consolidated Tax Filers in Bankruptcy.

 

 

 

 

 

Dr. A. Abdelmessih

Dr. A. Abdelmessih

Dr. A. Abdelmessih, professor of mechanical engineering, was a delegate to the 15th International Heat Transfer Conference Aug. 12. Abdelmessih presented an article titled Blinking and Temperature Gradients in Normal Functioning Human Eye. The International Heat Transfer Conference is the world’s premier conference for scientists and engineers in the heat and mass transfer research community, who convene every four years to exchange the latest information.  The acceptance rate for this refereed international conference was 53 percent. Abdelmessih also served as an associate editor for the International Heat Transfer Conference Proceedings.

 

 

Dayna Herrera, Dr. Hewitt Matthews and Dr. Nicole MacDonald

Dayna Herrera, Dr. Hewitt Matthews and Dr. Nicole MacDonald

Forty-eight faculty members from the College of Allied Health, School of Behavioral Health Sciences and the School of Nursing attended a two-day workshop on CBU’s campus titled Called2Collaborate an Interprofessional Education: A Faculty Workshop.The workshop was presented by the Called2Collaborate faculty committee consisting of Dayna Herrera (chair), Dr. Nicole MacDonald (co-chair), Dr. Jolene Baker, Dr. Kenneth Pearce, Dr. Meg Barth, Dr. Susan Drummond, and Dr. Carol Minton. This workshop provided an opportunity for university faculty to understand the national initiative on interprofessional education (IPE) and to work with multiple health related disciplines in planning IPE activities for use with students. Dr. Hewitt Matthews, vice president of health sciences at Mercer University, was keynote speaker.

 

 

Personnel Updates

Microsoft Word - HR chart

September 5, 2014

Ryan Gleason (left), RPU account manager, presents a grant check to Dr. Seunghyun Chu.

In this issue…

Current News

“SERVE program” connects new CBU students to community

Madison Quiring and Joshua Flaherty work with other students to wash service vehicles for Sherman Indian High School.

Madison Quiring and Joshua Flaherty work with other students to wash service vehicles for Sherman Indian High School.

New students at California Baptist University upheld a tradition of service by donating thousands of hours to community projects just days before the Sept. 2 start of the fall semester.

Nearly 1,700 students each completed two hours of community service Aug. 30, working on projects in elderly residents’ homes, at Operation Safe House, Sherman Indian High School and other facilities. They also worked at 10 locations coordinated through Keep Riverside Clean and Beautiful.

Kelli Welzel, director of new student programs, began the SERVE program last year to connect new students with the university’s neighbors.

Some student groups took the streets of Riverside, filling up bags with trash and cleaning playgrounds. One group painted a backdrop for a Child Abuse Prevention picnic. Some international students from China, France and Brazil served at Magnolia Church in a variety of ways.

“It’s a great way to interact with the community,” said Ashley Vidaurri, an incoming freshman. “It’s a lot of hard work but I’m willing to do it for the community.”

Vidaurri’s group, one of five working at Sherman Indian High School, raked gravel in a school parking lot. On another part of the campus, Federick Martinez, a member of Sherman’s maintenance staff, shoveled dirt from the back of a truck while other CBU students spread the soil over dead spots on school grounds.

“They have done an outstanding job,” Martinez said of the student volunteers. “From the coach to the principal, we appreciate their efforts.”

Martinez noted that this is not the only time the two schools interact. Throughout the year, CBU students tutor Sherman students.

“They are like older brothers and sisters,” he said. “There is so much help that comes from CBU for our students. They are a big part of our community.”

 

California Baptist University welcomes new students

Members of CBU's water polo team help new team members move in on campus.

Members of CBU’s water polo team help new team members move in on campus.

Classes began Sept. 2 at California Baptist University after a busy weekend of moving into campus housing and New Student Orientation activities.

“Everyone here is so nice and respectful of those around them,” said Hannah Herrman, freshman Christian studies major.

Herrmann, a triplet, drove to CBU with her father and two sisters from Everett, Wash., which took about 25 hours. When they arrived, she said the energy was “very upbeat and exciting. Everyone was eager to help out.”

Herrmann explained that her two sisters are entering the nursing program, while her Christian studies major will prepare her for youth ministry.

“We wanted the support of a Christian university,” Herrmann said. “We knew that God wanted us here.”

The Laker family from Anchorage, Alaska, moved their son, Josh, into Smith Hall dormitory.

Josh made the decision to apply after looking for a Christian university with an engineering program. He felt CBU had the strongest one.

“We really feel blessed that the Lord is providing,” said Steffanie Laker, Josh’s mother.

Once boxes were moved in, students and parents moved on to the rest of the orientation activities, which included a goodbye to the parents.

“Up until that point it felt surreal to be going to college but when I said goodbye (to my dad) it hit me that I was in college and going to be living on my own,” Herrmann said. “I felt excited and also a little sad for my dad knowing that his kids are all grown up and in college.”

Other New Student Orientation events included the Clash Bash, in which students played mini golf wearing mismatched clothes, community service projects and a Phil Wickham concert. They will also be involved in the FOCUS (First-Year Orientation & Christian University Success) program, which familiarizes them with campus life and introduces them to other new students.

Fall enrollment numbers will be announced at a later date.

 

CBU architecture program moving toward accreditation

architectureCalifornia Baptist University’s architecture program moved one step closer to accreditation recently when The College of Architecture, Visual Arts and Design (CAVAD) was notified that the program had officially been named a candidate for accreditation.

The five-year master of architecture degree program began last year with about 30 students. It can seek full accreditation after four years of candidacy and after the first class graduates.

A team from the National Architectural Accrediting Board (NAAB) visited the program in April, said Mark Roberson, dean of CAVAD. The team reviewed the curriculum, instructional plans and student work.

Graduates of the program take the Architect Registration Examination to become a registered architect. About 45 states now require architects to have an accredited degree before they can take the test.

“The goal at CBU is to provide an accredited degree, because you can’t be a registered architect unless you have an accredited degree,” Roberson said. “It’s really a huge goal of ours to provide our students with something valuable for the amount of investment that they’re putting into the program.”

CAVAD is expanding the program to include overseas partnerships. About 15 students from Jilin Jianzhu Architectural University in China are enrolling in CBU’s program this fall. The plan is develop a two plus three program, where Chinese students would attend JJAU for two years, then come to CBU for three years to complete a degree.

 

English program builds bridge to international students

Shelley Clow

Shelley Clow

Imagine pursuing a college degree in a language other than your mother tongue. A growing number of international students are doing just that at California Baptist University and fortunately for them, Shelley Clow is on the job. As director of CBU’s intensive English program, Clow works to help international students sharpen their English skills.

“I have always had a passion for international students,” Clow said. “The language-learning area is a field that I find fascinating and a bridge to connect me with international students and people of other cultures. So I get really inspired by relationships with these people, the courage that it must take to go pursue a degree in a language that is not their mother tongue.”

Clow has worked for six years as an adjunct professor in the program but also served as an academic advisor for Online and Professional Studies. In her current role, she will assess student needs and develop study plans in response.

The intensive English program prepares international students for the level of English proficiency they need to succeed in their academic program at CBU, she said. Some students don’t need the program at all. Those that do need help receive 20 hours of intense instruction per week, covering skills such as oral communication, listening, pronunciation, vocabulary, reading comprehension and writing.

About 80 new international students are expected to start in the fall, Clow said. Nearly one  third of that number will need the language program. CBU’s international students come from countries such as China, Brazil, India, Rwanda and South Korea.

The CBU community is in a unique position where the university is not going to international students around the world; they are coming to CBU, presenting an opportunity for students, faculty and staff to influence those who have never been reached by the gospel, Clow said.

“We have an opportunity to be the hands and feet of Jesus as well as to meet a need by teaching them English and language learning,” she said. “When people around campus have an opportunity to meet with or work with any of our international students, I hope they can see the opportunity to make a connection with someone who is from another part of this large world that God made and to appreciate what a special opportunity it is.”

Rickard named chair of CBU Bioengineering Department

Dr. Matthew Rickard

Dr. Matthew Rickard

When the bioengineering department in the Gordon and Jill Bourns College of Engineering was launched last fall, Dr. Matthew Rickard, associate professor, was named interim chair. In July, he was officially named chair.

The department currently offers a Bachelor of Science degree in biomedical engineering. In this field, students study the human body from an engineering perspective and learn about medical devices and technologies, and therefore the curriculum is grounded in mechanical and electrical engineering. This provides opportunities for students to create high-tech solutions for improving human health.

It is logical to house biomedical engineering in its own department, Rickard said.

“It made sense not to have that degree in an existing department,” he said.  “In the future we could add new degrees underneath bioengineering.”

Rickard’s goal is to offer other majors and possibly a master’s program. About six bioengineering students comprising the first class are expected to  graduate in 2016.

Dr. Mark Gordon, assistant professor, and Dr. Seung-Jae Kim, associate professor, are also part of the department.

The curriculum was created to comply with ABET requirements, Rickard said.

ABET is the recognized accrediting body of college and university programs in applied science, computing, engineering and technology. Other requirements consider faculty, student experience, facilities and continual improvement policy. According to ABET policy, CBU cannot apply for accreditation until after the first students graduate, Rickard said. It takes about a year of review, but the accreditation is retroactive to include all the first graduates.

 

CBU team wins NATA Quiz Bowl

NATA Quiz bowl champs

NATA Quiz bowl champs

What is the only muscle in the body that originates on the distal portion of a long bone and inserts on the distal portion of a long bone?

Most people may not know the answer, but a student in the College of Allied Heath athletic training program should. That was the final question a team of California Baptist University students had to answer for the National Athletic Trainers Association quiz bowl. (The answer: Brachioradialis)

For three consecutive years, CBU teams have won the regional Far West Athletic Trainers Association Quiz Bowl and went on to nationals. In June, the third time, a team from CBU won the national quiz bowl.

Two teams, each made up of three students in the athletic training program, competed at the regional quiz bowl in April and finished first and second. Three students also won cash awards for research posters at the regional conference.

The winning bowl team — Corrie Bober, Kelsie Gartner, Naclaysia McGee — went to nationals in Indianapolis to compete against teams from nine other regions.

The quiz bowl runs like Jeopardy, said Dr. Nicole MacDonald, associate professor of kinesiology and program director for the athletic training education program. There are categories to choose from and every team has a clicker. The competition is scored on how fast teams answer and if they respond correctly. The quiz covers material from the Board of Certification (BOC) exam, which all the students take.

“They don’t practice. We feel like the last two years of their education has been practice to be an athletic trainer and those are the skills that you need,” McDonald said. “It just shows how well our students do.”

The winning team received a check for $1,000 for the program.

“We don’t do anything special. It’s just for fun,” McDonald said. “But if you think about it, all these students are studying for the BOC exam, they’re all taking it right at the same time. It should be fresh in their minds.”

The students take at least three practice tests before the real thing, McDonald said. To be a certified athletic trainer, one must pass the BOC. The students knew answers for the quiz bowl and all the students knew them for the BOC exam. The 20 graduates from the program this year took the test in April or June. All passed, giving the program a 100 percent first-time pass rate.

 

 

Family Updates

Ryan Gleason (left), RPU account manager, presents a grant check to Dr. Seunghyun Chu.

Ryan Gleason (left), RPU account manager, presents a grant check to Dr. Seunghyun Chu.

Dr. Seunghyun Chun, assistant professor of engineering, received a $25,000 grant from Riverside Public Utility (RPU) to conduct research in Peak Energy Demand Shaving system, a joint research project with Pacific Energy Co. The funds will assist in building a working prototype system using photovoltaic panels, battery banks and power electronics to help stabilize the power grid.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Dr. Ronald L. Ellis presents the Employee of the Month award to Robert Vis.

Dr. Ronald L. Ellis presents the Employee of the Month award to Robert Vis.

Robert Vis, director of development, was selected Employee of the Month for September. His nomination form included the following statements: “Robert is well-respected by those he works with and for. His skill set also includes design, and he has gone above and beyond his job description and used those talents to improve the materials associated with University Advancement. He is an excellent director of development and, most importantly, a good and Godly man.”

 

 

 

 

 

About 1,700 new students converged on the CBU campus Aug. 28-31 for New Student Orientation. The theme was Connecting New Students to Campus, Classmates, College Life & Christ.
Activities included class registration, games and plenty of fun.

 

Dr. Riste Simnjanovski

Dr. Riste Simnjanovski

Dr. Riste Simnjanovski, assistant academic dean for Online & Professional Studies, recently edited an article for the Journal of the American Dental Association titled Clinical and radiographic success of mineral trioxide aggregate compared with formocresol as a pulpotomy treatment in primary molars: A systematic review and meta-analysis.

 

 

 

From left: Lupe Solano, Terry Couch, Pam Tebow, Jane Ellis and Daphne Paramo

From left: Lupe Solano, Terry Couch, Pam Tebow, Jane Ellis and Daphne Paramo

Women of Vision hosted an event Aug. 14 titled Hinds’ Feet in High Heels featuring Pam Tebow, mother of former NFL player Tim Tebow. More than 130 participated in the event. Proceeds will fund scholarships in the School of Nursing.

 

 

 

 

 

Robyn Glessner

Robyn Glessner

Robyn Glessner, adjunct professor of history, recently evaluated more than 600 student essays on historical topics of the reconstruction era and World War II as a reader for the College Board’s Annual AP Reading in U.S. history. She also attended a lecture by Eric Foner on his upcoming book about the underground railroad in New York City.

 

 

 

 

Dr. Charles Sands

Dr. Charles Sands

Dr. Wayne Fletcher

Dr. Wayne Fletcher

Sullivan Sean_fa_0038

Dr. Sean Sullivan

Dr. Charles Sands, dean of the College of Allied Health; Dr. Wayne Fletcher, chair of the department of health sciences; and Dr. Sean Sullivan, chair of the department of kinesiology represented CBU Aug. 23 at the Riverside Medical Clinical Foundation 5th Annual Dinner. In addition. Sands and Fletcher attended the MedAdvance Conference July 17-19, which was hosted by the Southern Baptist International Mission Board near Richmond, Va.

 

 

Krista Wagner, adjunct professor of English, recently published her debut novel, Intent, on Amazon Kindle.

 

Dr. Kyle Stewart

Dr. Kyle Stewart

Dr. Kyle Stewart, assistant professor of physics, presented research titled Angular Momentum Acquisition in Milky Way Sized Galaxy Halos at the University of California, Santa Cruz Galaxy Workshop on Aug. 15.

 

 

 

 

Dr. Anthony Chute

Dr. Anthony Chute

Dr. Anthony Chute, professor of church history and associate dean of the School of Christian Ministries, contributed a chapter on William Rogers for the book, A Noble Company: Biographical Essays on Notable Particular-Regular Baptists in America, Volume 5, recently published by Particular Baptist Press. Chute’s chapter is a biographical exploration of Rogers’ pastorate at the First Baptist Church of Philadelphia, chaplaincy during the Revolutionary War, professorship at the University of Pennsylvania and writings that shaped the missional outlook of early Baptists.

 

 

 

Dr. Tom Marshall during his presentation

Dr. Tom Marshall presents research during a recent conference.

Dr. Tom Marshall, professor of engineering, presented a paper Aug. 28 at the One Water technical conference sponsored by American Water Works Association and the Water Environment Association in Ohio.  The paper, titled JOINING FORCES – A Look at Restructuring of a Water and Sewer Utility,was based on Marshall’s engineering optimization study.

 

 

 

Personnel Updates

Microsoft Word - HR chart

August 21, 2014

Microsoft Word - HR chart

In this issue…

Current News

CBU announces new campus dining options

The Chick-fil-A stuffed cow sports a Lancer placard as the university prepares to open the restaurant’s new location on campus.

A Chick-fil-A restaurant and a new convenience store for quick meals on the go join the list of food service options at California Baptist University as the fall 2014 semester begins in early September.

“We are excited to welcome Chick-fil-A to California Baptist University and to add their healthy menu and signature customer service to our campus dining options,” said Dr. Ronald L. Ellis, CBU president. “In addition, the Campus Xpress location will allow students to choose quick meals when their time is limited.”

The two facilities will join the El Monte Grill, which opened earlier in the summer, as well as campus favorites Wanda’s, Brisco’s Café and the Alumni Dining Commons. All six locations are operated by Provider Food Services.

“As a nationally recognized brand, Chick-fil-A supports Provider’s on-going commitment to deliver superior quality food to the students, staff and faculty of CBU,” said Rodney Couch, founder and president of Preferred Hospitality Inc., Provider’s parent company. “My team and I are committed to providing fresh and delicious food, warm customer service and a comfortable dining experience with every visit.”

 

 

 

CBU alumnus extends passion for art to drawing class

Geoff Gouveia ('13) and Claudia Sandoval, a homeschool student from Calvary Chapel Living Waters

Geoff Gouveia (’13) and Claudia Sandoval, a homeschool student from Calvary Chapel Living Waters

CBU alumnus Geoff Gouveia (‘13) connects with others through writing and visual art. This summer he is passing that passion along to younger students.

Gouveia is teaching a beginning drawing class this month for students aged 12-18 at the CBU Gallery. While teaching drawing technique, he also hopes to teach the students confidence.

“One of the big things that I try to focus on is the idea of confidence within their own drawings,” Gouveia said. “I don’t like to use the eraser and most of the time I don’t supply them with one, because I want them to be confident in the mistakes in the learning process. And then through that, maybe it will bleed over into other areas of their school work or in their lives. Within the drawing, I know that confidence is a huge boost in gaining ability.”

Gouveia started pursuing art his junior year in high school, but did not take it seriously until his sophomore year after he went on a trip with CBU to Africa.

“On that trip I experienced a lot of emotions and things I couldn’t really express in the written word,” he said. “I’ve always kept a journal, and at that time things started to transition from the written word to more visual.”

Gouveia expresses himself on canvas and on the sides of buildings. He has painted murals in Riverside, Los Angeles, Tijuana, Brazil and Chile. He enjoys creating murals because of the challenge; canvas pieces may take a month to complete but he only has a few days for a mural.

“The personal challenge of this scale is always really fun with the time crunch,” he said. “You have a limited amount of time so your decision making will be really quick, your creativity’s peaked. So for me, the murals are a lot of fun and it’s a big challenge.”

In the drawing class, Gouveia is starting with smaller challenges. For instance, if students can only draw stick figures, he will help them learn form. If they can draw the form well, they move on to light. If they know about light, then Gouveia will talk about proportions.

“There’s always something you can work on,” he said. “That was one of the most frustrating things that I learned in school, that no matter how good I got, I was never that good. Even if I was taking this class as a student, I could definitely still be learning something. You’re never done.”

 

Family Updates

Dr. Helen Jung

Dr. Helen Jung

Dr. Ziliang Zhou

Dr. Ziliang Zhou

Dr. Anthony Donaldson

Dr. Anthony Donaldson

Dr. Grace Ni

Dr. Grace Ni

Dr. Rod Foist

Dr. Rod Foist

Dr. Rod Foist, associate professor of electrical and computer engineering, presented three papers at the First Year Engineering Experience 2014 Conference at Texas A&M University, College Station, in August.  The papers were written in collaboration with CBU faculty colleagues and were titled Use of Robotics in First-Year Engineering Math Laboratory by Foist and Dr. Grace Ni, associate professor of electrical and computer engineering; An Intuitive Calculus Project, Using Electronic Filters, for a First-Year Engineering Math Laboratory by Foist and Dr. Anthony Donaldson, dean of the Gordon & Jill Bourns College of Engineering; and Providing More Lab Options for First-Year Female Engineering Students in Math and Engineering Courses with Lab Components by Foist, Dr. Ziliang Zhou, professor of mechanical engineering; and Dr. Helen Jung, assistant professor of civil engineering.

 

Leontine Armstrong

Leontine Armstrong

Leontine Armstrong, adjunct professor of English, published an essay titled Shading in a Violent Shadow: A Hero’s Confrontation with the American Shadow in Tim’s Burton’s The Nightmare Before Christmas in the July issue of Mythological Studies Journal.

 

 

 

 

The program director of English studies at the Siriwat Wittaya Bilingual School in Thailand presents Dr. Daniel Skubik with a model of a “Tuk Tuk” taxi, common in Bangkok.

The program director of English studies at the Siriwat Wittaya Bilingual School in Thailand presents Dr. Daniel Skubik with a model of a “Tuk Tuk” taxi, common in Bangkok.

Dr. Daniel Skubik, professor of law, ethics and humanities, and his wife Bernadette just returned from an interfaith/intercultural dialogue trip to Southeast Asia Aug 4-14. They visited several private primary and secondary schools and universities, as well as various cultural sites with Muslim, Christian and Buddhist group participants. They also spoke with many students, faculty, administrative staff and local government officials about issues concerning education and development in both countries.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Kenneth Minesinger

Dr. Kenneth Minesinger

Dr. Kenneth Minesinger, associate professor of law for Online and Professional Studies, gave a presentation to the American College of Family Physicians of California at the 38th Annual Scientific Seminar in Anaheim, Calif., Aug. 7-10.  The topic was medical-legal issues facing physicians after the adoption of the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act.

 

 

 

 

Dr. Jennifer Newton

Dr. Jennifer Newton

Dr. Jennifer Newton, associate professor of English, recently published an article titled Finding Wisdom: George Herbert’s Response to Proverbs 9 in ‘Church-musick,’ ‘Christmas,’ and ‘Love (3)’ in the George Herbert Journal, vol. 35. Her essay demonstrates how, through parallels in wording and structure, these three works by the seventeenth-century poet George Herbert navigate readers beyond each individual poem to a collective imagined response to the call of Wisdom in Proverbs.

 

 

 

Ana Gamez

Dr. Ana Gomez

Dr. Douglas Wallace

Dr. Douglas Wallace

Dr. Ana Gamez, associate professor of forensic psychology, and Dr. Douglas Wallace, assistant professor of sociology, participated in a panel discussion at the Box Theater in Riverside on two short films: one depicting the 14,000 Pedro Pan children sent to the U.S. in the 1960s to escape Castro’s regime and another that follows a 9-year-old child laborer in India who has the opportunity for an education . The discussion centered on child labor exploitation. Gamez also gave a lecture Aug. 8 for the Institute for Law Enforcement Administration at the Center for American and International Law in Plano, Texas on the topic of Selection and Hiring of Ethical Police Officers. In addition, she co-authored an article titled Vicarious Traumatization: A Guide for Managing the Silent Stressor. The article was published in the August 2014 issue of Police Chief, the journal of the International Association of Chiefs of Police.

 

Dr. Hannah Hu works with students from the Upward Bound program.

Dr. Hannah Hu works with students from the Upward Bound program.

Forty high school students from the Upward Bound math and science program of Moreno Valley College visited California Baptist University July 25. Dr. Bruce Prins, professor of biology; Dr. Hannah Hu, assistant professor of chemistry; and Dr. Ricardo Cordero, assistant professor of mathematics, presented information about careers and research, provided hands-on activities such as blood typing and respiratory function/values and demonstrated light emitting chemicals and polymers.

 

 

 

 

Julie Goodman

Julie Goodman

Julie Goodman, assistant professor of anthropology, presented a paper titled Anthropology in the Real World Aug. 4 at the National Social Science Association Conference in San Diego. The presentation explored ways in which students can directly use anthropological skills for specific jobs in our current economy.

 

 

 

Josh's baby Hunter

Hunter Jacob van Baarsel

Joshua van Baarsel, lab coordinator for the department of natural and mathematical sciences, and his wife Sarah welcomed a baby boy to the family Aug. 1. Hunter Jacob was born at 3:19 a.m., weighing 7 lbs. 14 ozs. and measuring 20.5 inches long.

 

 

 

 

Kennedi Blayke Cox

Kennedi Blayke Cox

Morgan Cox, financial coordinator in the Campus Store, and her husband Joel welcomed their first child July 31, a daughter named Kennedi Blayke Cox. The baby was born at 12:45 p.m., weighed 8 lbs. 11 oz. and measured 19 inches long.

 

 

 

 

Personnel Updates

Microsoft Word - HR chart

August 6, 2014

Nursing students from Taiwan pose with CBU nursing faculty and students

In this issue…

Current News

CBU cheer team still on top, pushes toward third championship

CBU's cheer team

CBU’s cheer team

The California Baptist University cheerleading team continues to fly high.

At a National Cheerleaders Association/USA camp in July, the team once again earned a gold bid in its pursuit of a third straight NCA Championship in 2015. It also earned a gold bid to the 2015 USA College Championships. The team again took first place as camp champions – Best All Around, with a score of 203; second-place Weber State University had 183 points. The team also took first place in the Game Day Run Off, which included Division I coed teams, won the Top Gun Stunt Winner for the second year in a row and eight cheerleaders were named All-American.

“This is a great start to the 2014-2015 season,” head coach Tami Fleming said. “Our seasoned veterans paired with our talented rookie class have proven, once again, that CBU cheer plans to stay on top. The hard work, dedication and skill of this new team is unmatched and I look forward to a great year with these athletes.”

The results mean the cheer team can pursue another NCA title, after winning their second in April and being undefeated for the past two seasons.

“When they won, it was very cool. It was very validating,” Fleming said of the NCA win in April. “It made it feel like the first win wasn’t just a fluke. We weren’t just lucky to be the best team in the nation. We very clearly are the best team in the nation.”

Becoming a national team takes a lot of work. Practice is usually 2-2.5 hours daily Monday through Thursday, September through April. When it’s competition time, that can increase. The practices sometimes begin with a mile run with weights. And that’s just the warm-up.

Sophomore Mara Gates said all the hard work was worth it.

“The team work and the team ethics that we had was really cool to watch,” she said. “As we developed from summertime to being this well-oiled machine by the end of the year, it was really cool to watch and be a part of.”

The first year Fleming and assistant cheer coach Jason Larkins took over as coaches, the team came up with the motto “Passion, God, Success.”

“We really try to ingrain in them, be passionate about what you do, let God be the center of all of it and success will come,” Fleming said. “And it may not always be a first-place finish, it may come in another form. But they push to be successful, and so I think that team motto has just carried them through a lot of stuff.”

The team will again push to be successful this season.

“Nobody in the history of the division has ever won it three years in a row,” Fleming said. “So obviously our goal is to win it a third year and make history.”

 

CBU introductory engineering course offers fun, challenges

photo1photo3How does one make a bridge out of spaghetti and make it strong enough to hold weight? That was just one of the many things 10 high school students learned during an introductory engineering course at California Baptist University. Engineering Innovation, a four-week summer course developed by Johns Hopkins University, was offered at 14 sites nationwide. This was the first year CBU’s Gordon and Jill Bourns College of Engineeringoffered the program.

The course covered several fields of engineering, including chemical, electrical, computer, civil and mechanical. Nine students from the Inland Empire and one from Northern California also learned about finance and ethics and practiced oral presentation and written communications.

The purpose of the course was to get the students interested in engineering, said Grace Ni, associate professor of electrical and computer engineering. She and Dr. Mark Gordon, assistant professor of mechanical and biomedical engineering, co-taught the course.

“The goal of the program is mainly to inspire the young generation in engineering,” Ni said. “We let them know what engineering is about, how much fun engineering is and the different disciplines under engineering.”

The course included lectures and hands-on projects, such as designing and constructing a circuit to control a robotics car, and building a mousetrap and then writing down instructions for others to follow. Throughout, the students learned communication, how to give accurate instructions and teamwork.

The course culminated with the pasta bridges. The students learned about the strength of materials, designed a bridge on a computer and then built it. On the final day of the course, the students suspended increasing amounts of weight from the bridges until they broke. The spaghetti structures supported weights ranging from 36 to 62 pounds before collapsing.

“We want to show them engineering is really cool and you can have a lot fun, and what the essential skills are you need to grasp to be successful in the field of engineering,” Ni said.

 

Class brings Disney magic to CBU

Disney class

Dr. Jeffrey Barnes and members of the History 401 class at Disneyland

A little bit of Disneyland’s magic came to California Baptist University during the summer semester.

Dr. Jeffrey Barnes, associate professor and dean of academic services, taught more than 20 students in History 401 – Special Topics: The History of Disneyland.

The course provided an historical review of Southern California’s prominent cultural icon. The class focused on topics such as how the park mimics and mirrors the American Dream; the park’s place in American history and culture; its influence around the globe; and Disney’s impact on the entertainment industry.

During the eight-week session, Barnes incorporated entertainment and magic through two field trips and guest speakers. Students were given the VIP treatment at Disneyland for a hands-on experience and received a private tour at Garner Holt Productions in San Bernardino, which creates animatronic figures and more. The class also had the opportunity to hear from an array of guest speakers, who covered aspects of history, biography, culture and construction.

The first guest speaker, Disney historian Sam Gennawey, author of the class’ textbook The Disneyland Story: The Unofficial Guide to the Evolution of Walt Disney’s Dream, shared the beginning stages of Walt Disney’s career, Disneyland’s construction and opening day. Next, Bill Butler, creative director of Garner Holt Productions, discussed his history with both Disneyland and Garner Holt, as well as a technical history of the mechanics of auto-animatronics. Lastly, Mel McGowan, a former Disney Imagineer and president/founder of Visioneering Studios, presented Disneyland’s architecture, storytelling and theming. McGowan brought a fresh and unique faith-based perspective to Disneyland’s organization and building style. Being a strong believer in Christ-centered communities, McGowan said he viewed his role at Disney as a chance to highlight God’s glory through a form of re-creation.

Barnes summed up the class experience using a quote from Walt Disney himself: “It really is kind of fun to do the impossible.”

Family Updates

potteryThe pottery of ceramics instructor David Williams, adjunct faculty in the College of Architecture, Visual Arts and Design, is being featured at Hands Gallery in San Louis Obispo during the month of August.

 

 

 

 

 

Dr. Thomas Schneider

Dr. Thomas Schneider

Dr. Thomas Schneider, assistant professor of English for Online and Professional Studies, presented research July 17 titled Chaucer’s Physics: Motion in The House of Fame at the New Chaucer Society Conference at the University of Iceland in Reykyavik.

 

 

 

 

Dr. Jong-Wha Bai

Dr. Jong-Wha Bai

Dr. Jong-Wha Bai, associate professor and department chair of civil engineering, presented two papers titled Comparison between Seismic Demand Models and Incremental Dynamic Analysis for Low-Rise and Mid-Rise Reinforced Concrete Buildings and Seismic Fragility Estimates of Controlled High-Rise Buildings with Magnetorheological Dampers at the 10th U.S. National Conference on Earthquake Engineering (10NCEE) in Anchorage, Alaska July 21-25. He also co-authored an article titled Seismic Vulnerability Assessment of Tilt-Up Concrete Structures in the journal, Structure and Infrastructure Engineering: Maintenance, Management, Life-Cycle Design and Performance.

 

 

Dr. Timothy Mosteller

Dr. Timothy Mosteller

Dr. Timothy Mosteller, associate professor of philosophy, presented a paper titled Towards a Phenomenological Correspondence Theory of Emotions at the European Philosophical Society for the Study of Emotions in Lisbon, Portugal from July 18-20.

 

 

 

 

Nursing students from Taiwan with CBU nursing faculty and students

Nursing students from Taiwan with CBU nursing faculty and students

The School of Nursing hosted student nurses from Taiwan for two weeks this summer. The students were studying the American healthcare system.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Dr. Elaine Ahumada

Dr. Elaine Ahumada

Dr. Elaine Ahumada, chair of the department of history and government for Online and Professional Studies, was featured as the key presenter on the topic of Partnering: The 21st Century Employee Empowerment for the County of Riverside’s Fiscal and Administrative Manager’s quarterly meeting held at the Carriage House in Riverside on July 14, 2014.

 

 

 

 

Personnel Updates

HR chart

July 24, 2014

From left: Daniela Medina and Isabel Archuleta, CBU students, and Dr. Jodi Baker, associate professor of kinesiology, pose with a patient.

In this issue…

Current News

CBU team uses training in East Africa

From left: Daniela Medina and Isabel Archuleta, CBU students, and Dr. Jodi Baker, associate professor of kinesiology, pose with a patient.

From left: Daniela Medina and Isabel Archuleta, CBU students, and Dr. Jodi Baker, associate professor of kinesiology, pose with a patient.

A volunteer team from California Baptist University’s College of Allied Health has returned from East Africa after working for three weeks providing healthcare. Three faculty and 10 students used their skills and training to help a fieldworker who is a physical therapist.

The team had a four-tiered strategy, said Dr. Sean Sullivan, chair of the department of kinesiology, who was a member of the team.  In addition to working with the fieldworker, giving rehabilitative care in a hospital, they also provided health education at the hospital, a physical education class at a school and worked in a fitness facility.

Although the patients were diverse, the primary group for rehabilitative care were women who were house workers with low-back injuries, Sullivan said. And because the local infrastructure isn’t the same as in the U.S., the group worked with a minimal amount of equipment.

“Students had to be creative in how they treated patients,” Sullivan said. “Many of them realized how advanced the training is (at CBU and in the U.S.) and how privileged they are to have access to the types of tools that they have. I think many of them realized that they took for granted what most people didn’t even have access to. That was part of the learning experience, as well as to see patients who were really grateful for any type of service that could be offered.”

It was the second consecutive year that Sullivan helped lead a team to East Africa as CBU builds a relationship with the fieldworker.

“This was a great second step in an ongoing relationship for the college and for the university in Africa and God seems to be blessing it,” he said. “It was confirmation from God that He can use me and other faculty in real ways as we lead students to integrate their faith in service to others in specific ways according to their training. And it was also a reminder that we can serve others using our professional training anywhere.”

 

CBU hosts international music festival

music festival

Students perform before a panel of judges at the Hope-CBU International Music Festival.

About 50 students from China competed July 18-19 at California Baptist University in the inaugural Hope-CBU International Music Festival.

The students, ranging in age from 7 to 30, sang and played instruments, such as piano, double bass, cello and oboe. Judges consisted of a Chinese piano teacher and several faculty members from CBU’s School of Music.

Dr. Steve Betts, professor of music, was one of the judges for the piano category.

“Every person brings his or her own experience to the performance of music,” he said. “The events of each individual’s life and the depth of his or her insight concerning the piece he or she is performing bring a unique perspective to each performance.”

Winners received 1st and 2nd place awards. The other participants received honorable mention certificates.

The festival was a great way to showcase CBU and the quality of its music program, said Dr. Larry Linamen, vice president of global initiatives.

“We want our music program to be known across China.”

This summer more than 400 international students walked across CBU’s campus for language camps. All the camps included an English language and American cultural component. Groups included Colegio Batista Mineiro from Brazil, Ningbo City College of Vocational Technology from China and Affiliated Middle School to Jilin University from China.

 

Athletic training program achieves 10-year accreditation

Students work on simulators during an athletic training lab.

Students work on simulators during an athletic training lab.

California Baptist University’s athletic training program has received continuing accreditation for 10 years from the Commission on Accreditation of Athletic Training Education (CAATE).

The entry-level master’s program in the College of Allied Health, the first of its kind in California, had previously been accredited for five years in 2009 when the first students were preparing to graduate. Ten-year accreditation is the most a program can receive.

The program had to complete a self-study and submit to an accreditation visit to ensure it met the nationally recognized standards, said Dr. Nicole MacDonald, associate professor of kinesiology and program director for the athletic training education program. Those standards include having the right number of faculty and the proper equipment, as well as implementing health and safety procedures. It also must maintain a 70 percent first-time pass rate of the Board of Certification exam for a three-year aggregate. The percentage of CBU graduates passing the exam the past three years ranges from 88.24 percent to 100 percent.

Up to 20 students are accepted each year into the program. They complete a minimum of eight clinical rotations, giving the students experience in high school, collegiate, clinic and general medical environments.

MacDonald said the program is not about personal training or coaching but is more like medical care for the physically active. The 10-year accreditation is the culmination of hard work by both faculty and students.

“I was pretty excited, she said. “We expected it, but we’re still working hard. It shows our program is solid. It’s a big indicator we are doing the right things.”

Graduates of the CBU athletic training program have gone into careers with professional sports teams, olympic sport, universities, high schools and clinics.

 

CBU School of Behavioral Sciences announces new dean

Dr. Jacqueline Gustafson

Dr. Jacqueline Gustafson

Dr. Jacqueline Gustafson, a native of Washington, is the new dean of California Baptist University’s School of Behavioral Sciences.

Gustafson, who began her new role July 1, comes from Northwest University in Kirkland, Wash., a private Christian school of 1,740 students. At that institution, she was the associate dean for academic programs in the College of Social and Behavioral Sciences.

Gustafson worked at Northwest University in various positions for 14 years. She was ready for a new opportunity, she said.

“It was excellent timing. I think God’s provision was definitely in that.”

Gustafson moved to Riverside with her husband, David, and 6-year-old son, Abraham.

For now, she is busy settling in at CBU and the School of Behavioral Sciences, which has more than 400 undergraduate students and more than 300 in the graduate programs.

“My goal is really just to come and learn the culture of CBU and of the School of Behavioral Sciences and then create a plan for how we can take that existing culture and grow from that,” Gustafson said. “I’m very much of the philosophy of wanting to grow programs out of the existing dreams and skill sets in the School of Behavioral Sciences. I hope that I can bring my skills to the table to help make that happen.”

Gustafson, who also will be teaching Theories of Personality in the fall and advising graduate students on their theses, says education is her passion.

“Regardless of the specific class I’m teaching, my primary lens is that of an educator,” she said. “We have the content, but I’ll be thinking just as much about the types of students, how they learn, different models we can approach in the classroom, different ways we can innovate our programming.”

Gustafson also brings to CBU an interest in global studies, which was her focus in her doctoral program.

“As we’re studying psychology and how the human mind works and behavior is shaped, we need to do so within the context of understanding that we live in a globalized world,” she said. “We have a tremendous opportunity to respond to that challenge and to help serve in the midst of that culture.”

 

CBU announces “Gordon and Jill Bourns College of Engineering”

Bourns releaseOfficials at California Baptist University have announced the naming of the “Gordon and Jill Bourns College of Engineering” in honor of the Riverside couple’s longstanding support for the CBU engineering program.

Dr. Ronald L. Ellis, CBU president, said the naming recognizes the Bourns’ recent $5.5 million lead gift in the college’s “Equipping for Impact” campaign. Ellis said it was the largest single gift from individuals ever received by CBU and provided an auspicious launch for the fundraising campaign.

“I am very grateful to Gordon and Jill for their continuing support of California Baptist University and for this latest example of their wonderful generosity,” Ellis said. “This gift demonstrates their strong commitment to help prepare the engineers of the future and, more than that, it models an amazing spirit of philanthropy that I believe can inspire others to join us in funding this exciting project.”

Gordon Bourns is chairman and CEO of Bourns Inc., a leading manufacturer and supplier of electronic components. He also is chairing the campaign to fund construction of a new building to house the CBU engineering college that now bears his name along with that of his wife.

“We thought this would be a tremendous opportunity to share the blessings God has given us and to inspire others to give also,” Bourns said. “We are thankful for the opportunity to serve the Lord by serving CBU.”

The Bourns’ lead gift in the campaign is the latest demonstration of the couple’s support for the private university’s engineering program. A previous contribution in 2008 was recognized with the naming of the Bourns Engineering Laboratory at CBU.

Campaign proceeds will help fund construction of a planned three-story building encompassing 100,000 square feet of classrooms and state of the art equipment for the Gordon and Jill Bourns College of Engineering. Preliminary plans for the innovative building design will utilize green technology and sustainable construction, and feature two blocks of classroom, faculty and administrative space bracketing a massive engineering hall, providing multipurpose space for labs, projects, exhibits, presentations and student collaboration, as well as an interactive studio for K-12 STEM education.

 

CBU and Zhejiang Medical College enter partnership

China story

Dr. Larry Linamen (second front left), vice president of global initiatives, signs an agreement with Zhejiang Medical College during a formal a formal ceremony in China.

California Baptist University and Zhejiang Medical College in China are collaborating on a program that can help Chinese students obtain a degree in health care.

Dr. Larry Linamen, vice president of global initiatives, recently signed the document in a formal ceremony in China.

“This is the first program we’ve had that the government of China has approved,” Linamen said. “It is a big step for us because there is a tremendous amount of paperwork in getting these projects formally approved.”

Students will attend Zhejiang Medical College for three years and will continue their studies at CBU for two years. Upon completion, students will receive a Bachelor of Science degree in healthcare administration from California Baptist University.

CBU is recruiting students entering Zhejiang this fall, so those students would start attending CBU in 2017, said Dr. Charles Sands, dean of CBU’s College of Allied Health.

The program provides opportunities for international students who graduate to return to China with newly obtained skills. It also gives CAH faculty an opportunity to teach in China. Beginning next year, one or two CBU faculty members will teach in China for about a month.

 

Family Updates

Dr. C. Fyne Nsofor

Dr. C. Fyne Nsofor

Dr. C. Fyne Nsofor, associate professor of intercultural studies, was appointed associated editor of Missiology, the journal of the American Society of Missiology, beginning July 2014. Nsofor’s primary function will be to read and review journal articles submitted for publication. The journal is a forum for the exchange of ideas and research between missiologists and others interested in related subjects.

 

 

 

 

Dr. Elaine Ahumada

Dr. Elaine Ahumada

The Inland Empire Chapter of the American Society of Public Administration awarded three CBU graduate students in public administration scholarships at the organization’s annual awards banquet June 26. Michele Nissen was awarded a $1,000 scholarship, while Rachel McClure and Renee Poselski each received a $500 scholarship. Dr. Elaine Ahumada, chair of the department of history and government and program director for the master of public administration degree program, served as president of the chapter for a two-year term and will serve as chapter secretary beginning in September.

 

 

Noah Pryfogle with children and baseball equipment donated by Dr. Sean Sullivan, Dr. David Pearson and Gary Adcock.

Noah Pryfogle and Ugandan children with baseball equipment donated by Dr. Sean Sullivan, Dr. David Pearson and Gary Adcock.

Pam Pryfogle, adjunct faculty for Online and Professional Studies, recently traveled to Northern Uganda with her son and grandson, Michael and Noah Pryfogle, to complete her doctoral research and to host a Bible conference for women. Pryfogle’s son and grandson assisted with research and taught baseball to area children. Baseball equipment was donated by Dr. Sean Sullivan, chair of the department of kinesiology; Dr. David Pearson professor of kinesiology; and Gary Adcock, head coach of Lancers men’s baseball. For more about the Pryfogles’ travels in Northern Uganda, visit http://travelinggrace.wordpress.com

 

 

 

 

Parther, Daniel

Dr. Daniel Prather

Dr. Daniel Prather, professor and chair of the department of aviation science, taught four-day airport operations courses on behalf of the American Association of Airport Executives at the Port Authority of New York/New Jersey, as well as Phoenix Sky Harbor International Airport.

 

 

 

 

Sullivan Sean_fa_0038

Dr. Sean Sullivan

Dr. Wayne Fletcher

Dr. Wayne Fletcher

Dr. David Pearson

Dr. David Pearson

Dr. Charles Sands

Dr. Charles Sands

Dr. Sean Sullivan, chair of the department of kinesiology; Dr. Wayne Fletcher, chair of the department of health sciences; Dr. David Pearson, professor of kinesiology; and Dr. Charles Sands, dean of the School of Allied Health, all recently served at the Sandals Church Sports Camp.

 

 

Dr. Anne-Marie Larsen

Dr. Anne-Marie Larsen

Dr. Anne-Marie Larsen, associate professor of psychology and director of the graduate program in forensic psychology, presented research titled Heuristics of Women in Murder at the Western Psychological Association annual meeting in Portland, Ore. The presentation was a joint collaboration with CBU students Johanna Covarrubias and Taylor Baines. Several recent graduates of the forensic psychology graduate program presented posters at the meeting: Tiawna Jones, who presented research on the negative effects of pretrial publicity; Alison Peacock, who presented her work on the Women Wonder Writers program’s impact on self-esteem and self-efficacy; and Collette Strosnider, who presented research on infanticide.

 

 

Dr. David Isaacs

Dr. David Isaacs

Dr. David Isaacs, assistant professor of English, presented a paper at the Film and Media 2014 Conference at the University of London in June. His paper, Will Smith and the White Imaginary in Independence Day, explored portrayals of race in the popular sci-fi film.

 

 

 

 

Dr. Melissa Antonio (left) acts as a general biology class instructor introducing the learning goals of a class activity on concepts behind cell signaling.

Dr. Melissa Antonio (left) acts as a general biology class instructor introducing the learning goals of a class activity on concepts behind cell signaling.

Dr. Melissa Antonio, assistant professor of biology, attended the National Academies Summer Institute on Scientific Teaching June 22-27 at the University of California, Riverside. The institute, sponsored by the Howard Hughes Medical Institute, provided intensive training for faculty to sharpen teaching skills through evidence-based teaching methods designed to transform the undergraduate STEM (science, technology, engineering and mathematics) classroom.

 

 

 

 

 

Athena

From left: Debbi Guthrie, senior vice president of Raincross Hospitality Corp.; Channing Perea; and Darla Donaldson.

ATHENA of Riverside awarded CBU alumna Channing Perea a $1,000 scholarship May 28 as part of its ongoing mission to open doors of leadership opportunity for women through inspiration, education, cultivation and mentoring. Darla Donaldson, assistant professor of finance and social entrepreneurship, introduced Perea.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Dr. Jeff Cate

Dr. Jeff Cate

Dr. Jeff Cate, professor of New Testament, presented a paper titled Who Was Crucified and Where? The Case for Kaikos in Revelation 11:8 at the International Meeting of the Society of Biblical Literature in Vienna, Austria on Tuesday, July 8, 2014.

 

 

 

 

From left: Rodney Couch (Provider), Joe Adcock (CBU), Kent Dacus (CBU), Kevin Murray (Provider), Calvin Sparkman (CBU), Nora Garcia (Provider), Kipp Dougherty (Provider), Anthony Lammons (CBU), Eric Da Costa (Provider) and Mitch Holt (Provider).

From left: Rodney Couch (Provider), Joe Adcock (CBU), Kent Dacus (CBU), Kevin Murray (Provider), Calvin Sparkman (CBU), Nora Garcia (Provider), Kipp Dougherty (Provider), Anthony Lammons (CBU), Eric Da Costa (Provider) and Mitch Holt (Provider).

Nineteen CBU staff and Provider Food Service staff attended Chick-fil-A licensee training in Atlanta, Ga., June 18-19 in anticipation of opening the on-campus Chick-fil-A in the Fall 2014 semester.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Dr. William Flores

Dr. William Flores

Dr. William Flores, associate professor of Spanish and director of the Spanish program, is author of a book review published in the June 2014 edition of Hispania. The review is titled Scolieri, Paul A. Dancing the New World: Aztecs, Spaniards, and the Choreography of Conquest. Flores also participated at the McGraw-Hill Education’s Spring 2014 Spanish Symposium held in Los Angeles April 24-25. To view the review published in Hispania, click here.

 

 

 

These three WanBang middle school students are part of the Skype pen pal program. The girls are sitting under a sign that publically proclaims the WanBang school motto.

These three WanBang middle school students are part of the Skype pen pal program. The girls are sitting under a sign that publically proclaims the WanBang school motto.

The multiple and single subject credential programs have unofficially partnered with WanBang school in Harbin China. The program includes (1) CBU students using Skype to tutor the WanBang students and (2) using Skype to create modern pen pal relationships between middle and high school students in the U.S. and China. If you know individuals who would like to become part of either program, contact Dr. Keith Walters, associate professor of education.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Dr. Creed Jones

Dr. Creed Jones

Dr. Matthew Rickard

Dr. Matthew Rickard

Dr. Matthew Rickard, associate professor of engineering and chair of bioengineering, presented a paper on June 22 titled Experimental Investigation of Radio Frequency Identification Range for Intraocular Implants at BioMed 2014, the 11th International Conference on Biomedical Engineering meeting in Zurich, Switzerland. Co-authors of the peer-reviewed paper are Dr. Creed Jones, professor of software engineering, and three recent engineering graduates: Max M. Migdal, Nathaniel A. Reyes and Alexander D. Murguia. Rickard also was awarded to new patents, both of which control eye pressure for mitigating glaucomatous damage.

 

Sarah Pearce

Sarah Pearce

Dayna Herrera

Dayna Herrera

Dayna Herrera, assistant professor of nursing, and Sarah Pearce, School of Nursing lab assistant, gave a presentation titled The Art of Simulation: Developing, Creating, and Utilizing/Integrating Video Simulation In the Classroom and the Community at the International Nursing Simulation/Learning Resource Centers Conference, which met June 20th in Orlando, Fla. Pearce also made a presentation titled The Art of Instructional Acting: A guide for Training Undergraduate Theatre Students to Become Standardized Patients at the same meeting.

 

 

Dr. Chuck Sands

Dr. Charles Sands

Dr. Charles Sands, dean of the College of Allied Health, has been appointed to the Christian Medical & Dental Associations (CMDA) “The Commission for Advancing Medical Missions (CAMM). A CMDA commission is a group of volunteers that performs a ministry that CMDA may not have the administrative resources to accomplish. Commissions have access to CMDA’s 16,000 members, services, databases and infrastructure.

 

 

 

andymusserweddingAndy Musser (’12), financial aid counselor, married Kaleen Musich (’12) on June 15th.

 

 

 

 

 

The Payne family

The Payne family

Denise (Roscoe) Payne, credential analyst, and Andrew Payne were married on June 28, 2014 in Riverside. Andrew is employed with the Riverside County District Attorney’s Office. They live in Riverside with their three children, Michaela, Haley and Kevin.

 

 

 

 

 

Sivan - Newborn-8

Sivan Bradley Clark Winter

Dr. Natalie C. Winter, associate professor of business, her husband Aldee and daughter Aleida welcomed a baby boy to the family on June 3. The baby’s name is Sivan Bradley Clark Winter.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Judah Killian Ernst

Judah Killian Ernst

Megan Ernst, student accounts counselor, and her husband Chris welcomed a son, Judah Killian Ernst, on July 10.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Brittany and Taylor Neece with twins Cohen Michael Neece, Jones Andrew Neece and 2-year-old Norah.

Brittany and Taylor Neece with twins Cohen Michael Neece, Jones Andrew Neece and 2-year-old Norah.

Brittany Neece, lecturer in the School of Behavioral Sciences, and Taylor Neece, director of graduate admissions, welcomed twin boys on July 8. Cohen Michael Neece weighed 6 pounds, 14 ounces and Jones Andrew Neece weighed 6 pounds.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Personnel Updates

Microsoft Word - HR chartMicrosoft Word - HR chart

June 26, 2014

Dr. Mark A. Wyatt

In this issue…

Current News

CBU marks milestone with 400th ISP/USP team in 17 years

CBU's 400th volunteer team prepares to depart June 24 for their field of service in New York.

CBU’s 400th volunteer team prepares to depart June 24 for their field of service in New York.

California Baptist University sent out its 400th volunteer service team June 24 with a celebration that included prayer, cake and commemorative T-shirts.

The team, which will work in New York for three weeks, was also the 45th group of students, faculty and staff of the year and part of the fourth and final wave of International Service Projects (ISP), U.S. Projects (USP) and Summer of Service (SOS)teams for 2014. The last 11 groups for 2014 went to France, Spain, United Kingdom, Japan, Thailand, Central Asia, East Asia, South Asia and Baltimore. This year, more than 400 participants have served in 16 countries.

CBU launched its flagship global mobilization program in 1997. Jared Dobbins, assistant director of mobilization, noted that the university sent out the 100th team in 2007 and took just seven years to send out another 300 teams.

“California Baptist University trains and sends out more short-term volunteers in the summer than any other university in the country,” said Kristen White, director of global mobilization. The reason CBU has such a strong number of volunteers is because the university is tapping into what God has already put in people, she said.

“They’ve come to CBU to get a professional skill set and we’re saying ‘look, you can use this to be a kingdom professional,’” White explained. “That’s the new phrase we’re really trying to stress. We tell them: ‘Live your purpose by being a kingdom professional. And we don’t just want you to prepare for the world when you graduate, we want you to engage the world while you’re here. We’re not going to just tell you to do it, we’re going to go with you and do it.’”

New students take a Step Ahead

Step Ahead is a program that gives freshman and transfer students a head start on the fall registration process.

Step Ahead is a program that gives freshman and transfer students a head start on the fall registration process.

The 2014-15 school year hasn’t started yet, but new students are already finding their way around California Baptist University with Step Ahead.

The Step Ahead events help prepare freshmen and transfer students for the new college experience. At the event, the students register for classes, learn about financial aid, get their student ID picture taken and learn about the resources available to them, such as free tutoring, the Wellness Center and the Recreation Center.

Step Ahead gets the students ready for the fall and also helps them and their parents be comfortable with their college choice, said Rhonda Shackelford, undergraduate admissions visit and events coordinator.

“It’s a great day to get them on our campus, get them registered for classes,” she said. “We try to do our best to make it very welcoming and very inviting, and for them to feel settled that this is the right choice. We want parents and students to be assured that ‘yes, CBU is the right choice for me and my student.’”

They also get to experience college dining by having lunch at the Alumni Dining Commons. At the end of the day, the participants have the option of touring the living areas.

Parents join their student on some of the informational sessions, and they also have their own sessions, such as on school policies and a Q&A with a panel from various areas of student services.

“I think it’s a good transitional point for parents to feel comfortable,” Shackelford said. “Once they leave there, we want parents to feel comfortable about dropping off their students for orientation.”

Although Step Ahead is about a beginning, students and parent will get a glimpse of what the end will look like, Shackelford said. This year, the participants watch a video of students who attended Step Ahead, have graduated and are working.

“We’re really excited that we can showcase people that came to Step Ahead and that now have a job,” she said. “We wanted to be able to show parents at the end of this journey, it works. Our goal is to have that child graduate and get a job and be successful, not only in their career, but growing in their faith and being able to contribute to the body of Christ.”

 

Family Updates

Dr. Mark A. Wyatt

Dr. Mark A. Wyatt

Dr. Mark A. Wyatt, vice president for marketing and communication, was elected recording secretary for the International Association of Baptist Colleges and Universities at the organization’s annual meeting June 1-3 in Charleston, S.C.

 

 

 

 

The College of Allied Health sponsored the Greater Riverside Chambers of Commerce Good Morning Riverside at The Mission Inn on June 12. CBU faculty and staff joined the morning event and listened to an update from Dr. Chuck Sands, dean of the College of Allied Health. Sands talked about the growing programs and the numerous service opportunities in the CAH, and featured a video recently produced by Eric Mendoza, CBU marketing specialist.

 

The College of Allied Health's global health engagement team is currently working in East Africa.

The College of Allied Health’s global health engagement team is currently working in East Africa.

The College of Allied Health (CAH) sent off the first global health engagement team June 14. The team, comprised of CAH students and faculty, will be assisting field workers in East Africa and is led by Dr. Sean Sullivan, professor of kinesiology, Dr. Jodi Baker, associate professor of athletic training, and Amy Miller, assistant professor of kinesiology for Online and Professional Studies. Updates from the team can be found at http://calbaptist.blogs.edu/alliedhealth.

 

 

 

 

From left: Dr. Sangmin Kim, associate professor of health sciences; Brittany Northway; Stephanie Curnow; Dr. Meg Barth, professor of nutrition and food sciences; Sarah Velez; Lesley Garnica; Michelle Granger, Family Services Association nutrition manager.

From left: Dr. Sangmin Kim, associate professor of health sciences; Brittany Northway; Stephanie Curnow; Dr. Meg Barth, professor of nutrition and food sciences; Sarah Velez; Lesley Garnica; Michelle Granger, Family Services Association nutrition manager.

Nutrition and food sciences students have been presenting the Rethink Your Drink seminar, which encourages people to select healthier beverages, at eight sites this summer. The department of health sciences and College of Allied Health have established an affiliation agreement with the Family Services Association to serve the senior community in Riverside County through course-related activities and service learning in the area of health education and nutrition assessments.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Gary Steward, adjunct professor of history and government for Online and Professional Studies, presented a paper May 31 titled Justifying the American Revolution: The American Clergy and Reformed Political Resistance at the Christians in Political Science Conference at Azusa Pacific University.

 

Dr. Timothy Mosteller

Dr. Timothy Mosteller

Dr. Tim Mosteller, associate professor of philosophy, participated in the Baptist Association of Philosophy Professors Summer Seminar May 19-23 at the University of Notre Dame. The seminar was led by Dr. John Haldane, professor of philosophy at St. Andrews University, one of the world’s leading Christian philosophers. The topic of the seminar was Analytic Thomism and included formal and informal discussions led by Haldane.

 

 

 

Dr. Daniel Skubik

Dr. Daniel Skubik

Dr. Daniel Skubik, professor of law, ethics and humanities, was one of 19 faculty competitively selected nationwide to participate June 2–13 in the 2014 Silberman Faculty Seminar in Washington, D.C. Titled Teaching about the Holocaust in the Soviet Union: Perpetrators, Collaborators, Bystanders, and Victims, the meeting was sponsored by the Mandel Center for Advanced Holocaust Studies, at the U.S. Holocaust Memorial Museum.

 

 

Dr. Dawn Gilmore and her husband, Glenn, at commencement ceremonies in Orange Park, Fla.

Dr. Dawn Gilmore and her husband, Glenn, at commencement ceremonies in Orange Park, Fla.

Dr. Dawn Gilmore, assistant professor of music, recently received a doctorate of worship studies degree from the Robert E. Webber Institute for Worship Studies in Orange Park, Fla. Her thesis was titled Developing a Biblical Foundation for Christian Worship Course for the Master of Music Program at California Baptist University.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

June Cover JBSDr. Anthony Chute, professor of church history, and Dr. Matthew Emerson, assistant professor of Christian ministries for Online and Professional Studies, have published the latest edition of the Journal of Baptist Studies. In addition to articles on significant Baptist people and movements, the journal contains several book reviews solicited through John Gill, assistant professor of Christian ministries for OPS The journal can be accessed at http://baptiststudiesonline.com/the-journal-of-baptist-studies-6-2014/

 

 

Dr. Mary Ann Pearson

Dr. Mary Ann Pearson

Dr. Michael Chute

Dr. Michael Chute

Dr. Michael Chute, professor of journalism and program director for journalism and public relations, participated June 18 in a panel discussion on public relations education for about 40 members and guests of the Public Relations Society of America-Inland Empire at the Victoria Club in Riverside. The panel also included faculty from La Sierra University and California State University, San Bernardino. Dr. Mary Ann Pearson, associate professor of public relations for Online and Professional Studies, moderated the panel.

 

 

Dr. Erin Smith

Dr. Erin Smith

Dr. Erin Smith, assistant professor of psychology, presented a poster titled Psychological Essentialism Influences Personal Identity Concepts in Chinese and American Children at the Association for Psychological Science’s 26th Annual Convention held in San Francisco May 22-25.

 

 

 

 

Robert Vis

Robert Vis

Robert Vis, director of development, received the master of business administration degree from La Sierra University in commencement ceremonies June 15.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Dr. Derek Updegraff

Dr. Derek Updegraff

Dr. Derek Updegraff, assistant professor of English, attended the 49th International Congress on Medieval Studies May 8-11 at Western Michigan University. Updegraff delivered a paper titled Manuscript Layout, Old English Poems, and Visual Lineation: Reassessing the Uses of Aural Verses and Visual Lines in Modern Translation.

 

 

 

 

Dr. Tim Luther

Dr. Tim Luther

Dr. Tim Luther, professor of political science, is author of a book titled Jürgen Habermas’s Reconstruction of Modernity: Reconciling Individual Autonomy and Community Solidarity, published recently by Linus Books in New York. He also presented a paper, Shifting from Philosophy to Culture: Rorty’s Deconstruction of Certainty at the Oceanic Popular Culture Association Annual Conference meeting in Riverside May 23 and another paper titled Reconstructing Deconstruction: Derrida’s Messianic Twist at the Pacific Ancient and Modern Language Association Annual Conference, which met in San Diego on Nov. 2.

 

 

From left: Anthony Francis, CBU; Tim Lanski, University of Mississippi; Tina Galinato, University of California, Davis; Dr. David Pearson; Brian Chan, intern at California Poly Pomona; and Aldee Winter, University of California, Irvine

From left: Anthony Francis, CBU; Tim Lanski, University of Mississippi; Tina Galinato, University of California, Davis; Dr. David Pearson; Brian Chan, intern at California Poly Pomona; and Aldee Winter, University of California, Irvine

Dr. David Pearson, professor of kinesiology and faculty athletics representative, recently attended the NCAA Regional Rules Seminar and had lunch with recent graduates of CBU’s sport management graduate program who are working at NCAA member institutions in athletics compliance.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Kendra Johnson

Kendra Johnson

Kendra Johnson, academic evaluations coordinator, presented a paper titled Online Course Evaluations: How to Achieve an 82 Percent Response Rate at the 2014 Association for Institutional Research FORUM, which met May 28-June 1 in Orlando, Fla.

 

 

 

From left: Dr. Nona Cabral, Dr. Jerome Sattler and Dr. Jane McGuire

From left: Dr. Nona Cabral, Dr. Jerome Sattler and Dr. Jane McGuire

Dr. Nona Cabral and Dr. Jane McGuire, both associate professors of education, attended a conference May 30 at Azusa Pacific University on Assessment of Children’s Behavioral, Social and Clinical Functioning. The meeting featured Dr. Jerome Sattler, emeritus professor at San Diego State University. Sattler is a diplomate in clinical psychology of the American Board of professional psychology.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Christy Walker, daughter of Dr. Deron Walker, professor of English, bowled May 3-4 in the 2014 California Pepsi United States Bowling Congress (USBC) Youth Championship State Finals at Fountain Bowl in Fountain Valley, Calif. Christy qualified for the state finals with high scores at the USBC regional event in Victorville, where she placed second among 14 qualifying female bowlers in her division, bowing a 423 scratch series and a 738 series with handicap.

 

Phylicia and Clint Heinze

Phylicia and Clint Heinze

Karen Heinze, administrative assistant in the College of Architecture, Visual Art and Design, announces the marriage of her son, Clint Heinze (’12) to Phylicia Paulson (’11) in Menifee on March 29.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Personnel Updates

Microsoft Word - HR chart

June 11, 2014

athletics

In this issue…

Current News

Next wave of ISP/USP teams heads out around the globe

Team members pray with family and friends before their departure to fields of service.

Team members pray with family and friends before their departure to fields of service.

California Baptist University is sending out another wave of International Service Projects (ISP) and U.S. Projects (USP) teams, with the last of those teams leaving June 11. Eight groups, including an all-faculty team, are heading to South Asia, East Asia, Southeast Asia, Central Asia, Southeast Europe, Greece and Spain. This summer, 45 teams with 408 participants will serve in 16 countries.

“We believe that every follower of Jesus is called to be a world Christian. To give them this short-term opportunity is what we in ISP and USP are all about,” said Kristen White, director of global mobilization.

 

 

 

 

Lancers finish top 26 in NCAA Division II

athleticsThe 2013-14 season marked a new era for the California Baptist University athletic program. Not only did the Lancers qualify 11 teams for the NCAA playoffs, boast a 131-33 record at home, win its first-ever NCAA Division II individual championship, and four conference titles, CBU placed No. 26 in the Learfield Sports Directors’ Cup final standings, as announced Wednesday.

“I’m very proud of the way our programs competed in their first year of post-season eligibility,” said Director of Athletics Dr. Micah Parker.  “We gained invaluable experience with so many teams getting the opportunity to compete in NCAA championships. To finish in the top eight-percent of all NCAA DII schools in our first year is a great accomplishment. It also gives our department some goals for the future because we want to keep improving.”

To read the complete story, click here.

 

Zipcar helps students get around

zipcar2For some students, attending college means asking friends for a ride, whether to the grocery store or the movies. At California Baptist University, students have another option. CBU offers two rental cars through Zipcar.

“Parking has become more of a challenge, and we want to give students an option of not bringing a car to school,” said Joe Adcock, assistant dean of students.

Any student, faculty or staff member can use the car, although it’s especially attractive to out-of-state and international students, he said.

Eric Ruta (’13) used the car to run errands, such as going to the bank or shopping. He is from Rwanda and also used the car to take other international students on errands. “I am extremely appreciative of this program,” Ruta said.

People have to sign up with Zipcar and pay to receive an access card. Once they receive a card, they go on the website or the mobile app and reserve their time. Reservations can be made by the hour or the day, and rates include gas and insurance, though not taxes. When it’s their reservation time, drivers just scan their card over a reader in the windshield and the car unlocks.

About 100 people at CBU have signed up to receive a card, Adcock said. He is also marketing the cars to campus offices, such as Admissions, which often makes trips to high schools. The cars also were promoted at freshmen orientation last year and at the Club Fairs. Parents attending the Step Ahead event are told of the program as well.

Matthew Fuller, a senior from Yucaipa, does not have a car on campus. He has used the Zipcar for off-campus activities, such as seeing a family member who is in town. He said the cars give him an option if he has to get off campus.

Zipcar’s annual survey of Millennials (those in the 18-34 age group) in the U.S., which Zipcar has conducted the past four years, has shown that young people value access over ownership, according to CJ Himberg, public relations specialist with Zipcar. The company’s cars can be found on more than 350 campuses across the country.

Osiris Vincent Ntarugera (’13), from Rwanda, used the car to run errands, go to the mall or the airport. “I am definitely glad CBU has that program, because as a student without a car, it was hard for me to find a ride from a friend. Now, I can just pick up the car and do my errands.”

 

Career Center aids students in job searches

photoSome spring 2014 graduates at California Baptist University are returning to the CBU Career Center to get assistance in their job search.

While some did not take the time to go to the center before receiving their degrees, others just need a little more help, said Mike Bishop, associate director.

“Whether it’s OPS (Online and Professional Studies), graduate students, or even traditional students, they’re coming back for mock interviews or actually redoing mock interviews,” Bishop said. “Some are looking for help on their LinkedIn profiles. A number of students are asking for resume assistance.”

In addition to these services, the Career Center offers help with job searches and conducts career fairs, employer presentation weeks and a professional etiquette dinner.

One example of the center’s work was when the chief engineer for the Pearl Harbor Naval Station called because he heard CBU’s engineering school was strong, Bishop said. Earlier this month about 15 students attended a general information session about being an engineer at the naval station, and the engineer interviewed 12 of them two days later at the Career Center.

Instead of just waiting for the students to come, the Career Center recently has become more intentional in reaching them, Bishop said. The center is working with deans and professors to promote its services, and it has more than 900 followers on Twitter.

“We’re also being asked by a lot of professors to come in and actually teach a class,” said Chelsea Dirks, career counselor/internship coordinator.

“We’re experiencing a lot of successes, from not only the events, but from the counseling, from the interviews, where students are coming back and voluntarily saying, ‘I got the job. I’m employed.’ So there’s a nice outcome from the work,” Bishop said.

The Career Center is not just for seniors. Bishop and Dirks said they encourage all students to visit at least once a semester.

“We want freshmen to begin using us from the very beginning, even if it’s ‘I’m not sure what my major is going to be. What are the career options in this major?’ We do help all levels,” Dirks said.

“We’re here to align their education with what may be out there in the job market and to show them how to do that,” Bishop said.

 

Family Updates

Dr. Juliann Perdue

Dr. Juliann Perdue

Kim Bailey

Kim Bailey

Dr. Juliann Perdue, associate professor of nursing, and Kim Bailey, nursing admissions specialist, along with 14 graduate nursing students, participated in the inaugural Pre-Health and Pre-Medical Conference at the University of Riverside (UCR) on May 18. Nursing students served on the admission panel and shared their insights and experiences with prospective students. Topics included admission requirements, selection criteria and how to position oneself as a strong applicant. They also talked to interested attendees at the recruitment fair and received a record number of inquiries for our nursing programs.

 

 

Dr. Julie Browning

Dr. Julie Browning

Dr. Julie Browning, associate professor of accounting for Online & Professional Studies, presented a lecture to the accountants of the Riverside County Sheriff’s Department on the topic of career development and professional licensures for accountants.

 

 

 

 

Mary Davidson (right) with her mother, Pam Pryfogle, adjunct professor for Online and Professional Studies

Mary Davidson (right) with her mother, Pam Pryfogle, adjunct professor for Online and Professional Studies

Mary Davidson completed her master of science degree in counseling psychology from CBU on May 3 and received the Merit Award for Academic Excellence and Commitment from the School of Behavioral Sciences. Davidson continues to work full-time as administrative assistant for the College of Allied Health and part-time as a marriage and family therapist trainee at Crossroads Church in Corona.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Dr. Chuck Sands

Dr. Chuck Sands

Dr. Chuck Sands, dean of the College of Allied Health, presented the 2nd session of a four-part leadership development program for the staff at Sandals Church. The other two sessions will occur later in 2014.

 

 

 

 

 

Kinsley Joy Welzel

Kinsley Joy Welzel

Keith and Kelli Welzel, director of new student programs, welcomed their second daughter on June 1. Kinsley Joy Welzel was born at 7:55 p.m. and weighed 7 lbs. 10 oz.

 

 

 

 

 

Guy E. White V

Guy E. White V

Dr. Kristen M. White, assistant professor of psychology for Online & Professional Studies, and Dr. Guy E. White IV, adjunct faculty in English for OPS, welcomed their second child, Guy E. White V, on May 24 at 8:34 a m. The baby weighed 7 lbs. 10 ozs. and measured 21 inches long.

 

 

 

 

 

Turner Vine

Mr. and Mrs. Vincent Vine Jr.

Jenelle Turner married Vincent Vine Jr. at her parent’s house in Devore on May 17. Turner is an admissions counselor at Online & Professional Studies’ Temecula Service Center.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Personnel Updates

HR chart

 

May 29, 2014

Math-Physics-of-Hollywood-InsideCBU--6-6

In this issue…

Current News

CBU sends second wave of volunteers

ISP globe shotCalifornia Baptist University sent 10 more International Service and U.S. Service teams to fields of service May 20-22. The volunteers will be working in South Asia, East Asia, Central Asia, Finland, the United Kingdom, Baltimore and New York.

The teams will join 16 others already at work in Thailand, East Asia, Southeast Asia, East Asia, South Asia and Italy. In all, 45 teams will serve in 16 countries this summer with more than 400 participants involved.

“Research shows that community and responsibility are the top two concerns that our students have,” said Kristen White, director of global mobilization. “Our faculty and staff leaders seek to connect with and invest in students to challenge them to take their next step in engaging the world. We are not just a ‘sending’ program; we are a discipleship program with a goal of investing in lives to develop followers of Jesus.”

CBU contributed nearly 35,000 service hours in 2013 through its flagship International Service Program/United States Program/Summer of Service opportunities, administered through the Office of Mobilization.

 

CBU repeats national ranking for Online Programs for Veterans

CBU_Yeager_Entrance_from_Drive_Panoramic_Day_WEBCalifornia Baptist University’s online programs have earned the No. 13 spot in the 2013 Best Online Bachelor’s Degree Programs for Veterans rankings by U.S. News & World Report. For the first time, CBU Online was also ranked 28th for CBU Online’s Graduate Business program and 34th for CBU Online’s Graduate Education degree.

CBU entered the online education market in the spring of 2010 with programs offered by the university’s Division of Online and Professional Studies. CBU now offers 158 majors/concentrations and 41 master’s degrees and serves more than 3,100 students online throughout the United States.

“I’m pleased to announce that once again we have been ranked by U.S. News as a Best Online Programs for Veterans,” said Dr. David Poole, vice president for Online and Professional Studies at CBU.  “What is different this year is we were not only ranked in the Bachelor’s category (#13th nationally), but also in Graduate Business (28th nationally), and Graduate Education (#34th nationally).  To take it one step further, faculty credentials and training rank was #8 for Bachelor’s and #3 for Education.  This is a strong testament to the exemplary efforts of faculty who have put together exceptional programs and staff who do an outstanding job of providing superior customer service to our veteran population.”

To help veterans choose a quality online program, U.S. News has launched its annual rankings of the Best Online Programs for Veterans, according to its website. All of the ranked programs belong to institutions that are certified for the G.I. Bill and participate in the Yellow Ribbon Program, two federal initiatives that help veterans reduce the cost of school.

Also named by G.I. Jobs magazine as a 2014 Military Friendly School, CBU offers accelerated degree completion programs, with classes accessible fully online or in a hybrid format (virtual and synchronous) at educational service centers near some of California’s largest military bases.  Courses begin every eight weeks and faculty is committed to student academic, professional and spiritual success.

For more information on the U.S. News Top Online Programs for Veterans rankings, please visit http://www.usnews.com/education/online-education.

 

Math-Physics-of-Hollywood-InsideCBU--6-6Learning the science behind Hollywood

A science class offered this fall at California Baptist University will approach the subject of physics in a whole new way.

PHY 112 The Physics of Hollywood is described as “a study of optics, cameras, lighting, sound, analog vs. digital processes, polarization and the 3-D movie making process.” The class is designed for students in theater, graphic design, music, film studies, communications and art. It will focus on laws of physics including Faraday’s Law and Ampere’s Law in such a way to help students better relate them, said Dr. Jim Buchholz, professor of mathematics and physics. For instance, they will learn how to build speakers and microphones and how concert halls work.

“The whole class is about showing,” he said. “I want them to see it in action.”

In his 25 years of teaching at CBU, Buchholz has changed his opinion about general education classes. He said he now wants classes to be more interdisciplinary.

“I want people to walk away from science class being able to apply it to their major,” he said.

The Physics of Hollywood will offer a lecture and lab that will be almost indistinguishable, with students alternating between class and lab work.

Buchholz’s interest in Hollywood is partly a result of his involvement in the entertainment industry for many years. He started out as a stand-up comic and was one of seven finalists on the American Collegiate Talent Showcase in 1985. He has made short films that have been released at film festivals in California, Canada and Italy, and he recently finished another short. He is also on the board of the Riverside International Film Festival.

 

Riverside mayor recognizes CBU internship program

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From left: Dr. Patricia Hernandez, Dr. Mary Ann Pearson, both of CBU’s Online and Professional Division, and Kris Whitehead, Riverside Downtown Partnership board of directors chair and owner of Curves on Main Street. Robbie Silver, of the Riverside Downtown Partnership, is speaking into the microphone.

Riverside Mayor Rusty Bailey recognized the Downtown Intern Program as a Riverside Pride Mayoral Success Story in a city hall ceremony May 20. The Downtown Intern Program is a joint program between California Baptist University and the Riverside Downtown Partnership.

The Downtown Intern Program came out of a social media seminar that the partnership held in October 2013 for downtown businesses. The seminar was presented by Dr. Mary Ann Pearson, associate professor of public relations, and Dr. Patricia Hernandez, assistant professor of communication studies, both of CBU’s Online and Professional Division. Many of the downtown businesses attending indicated that having interns assist with social media efforts would be helpful. Robbie Silver (’13), communications and events liaison for the Riverside Downtown Partnership, Pearson and Hernandez interviewed students for the program.

Once students were accepted, their skills and personality were matched with the needs of specific downtown business to assist with social media, event planning, networking and communication campaigns.

The participating businesses consisted of service, non-profit, government, business associations, retail/fashion and hospitality.

The program provides the businesses with the help they need and the students with experience, recommendations and networking opportunities, Pearson said. She said the program also provides internships and mentoring, which students need.

The program also is important for the city.

“Keeping college graduates in Riverside after graduation has always been part of my vision and the hope of our city,” Bailey said. “This internship program leads the way in connecting our local university students to the right place where they can grow in their chosen career path. I commend the RDP for their plan and partnership with CBU. I hope we can use this pilot program to inspire more collaboration and placement of talent here in Riverside.”

 

Forum panelists identify delinquency and truancy issues

From left: Moderator Sheri Stuart with candidates for the Riverside County Board of Education: Michael Martinez Scott, Kenneth Young, Jeanie Corral, Gerald Colapinto, Lynne Craig and Wendel Tucker

From left: Moderator Sheri Stuart with candidates for the Riverside County Board of Education: Michael Martinez Scott, Kenneth Young, Jeanie Corral, Gerald Colapinto, Lynne Craig and Wendel Tucker

Eleven Riverside County candidates for public office participated in an educational forum May 13 to discuss a variety of topics, including juvenile delinquency and truancy in Riverside County.

“Believe it or not, we still have school truancy at the university level,” said Marilyn Moore, CBU associate professor of behavioral sciences, as she introduced the program. “What we’re finding is, as students come in with that as their habit, they bring their truancy with them.”

Panel members included candidates for the Riverside County Board of Education: Michael Martinez Scott, Kenneth Young, Jeanie Corral, Gerald Colapinto, Lynne Craig and Wendel Tucker; Riverside County Board of Supervisors candidate Arthur Gonzales; sheriff candidates Chad Bianco and Stan Sniff; and district attorney candidates Mike Hestrin and Paul Zellerbach.

Moderator Sheri Stuart, executive director of One Nation Media, kicked off the discussion by quoting an Attorney General’s 2013 Report that showed elementary truancy in Riverside County during 2011 and 2012 was 23.9 percent—more than 53,000 students—which was among the highest rates in the state.

“Our kids are not engaged, and they’re finding other things to do than to be involved in school,” Zellerbach said. “Oftentimes problems start at home, and they bring those problems to school. It’s important that we collaborate. If graduation rates increased 10 percent, violent crime would decrease by 20 percent.”

The candidates identified a variety of reasons for truancy in Riverside County schools.

“The causes are complicated, but we have to tackle them head-on,” Hestrin said. “We should concentrate not on punishment but bringing them back in the fold.”

“It starts with chronic absenteeism, which then becomes truantism, which turns into juvenile delinquency,” Zellerbach added. “We have to work together, communicate with each other and get our kids back in school before they turn to criminal behavior.”

The event, which took place in Wallace Theatre on the campus of California Baptist University, was sponsored by Women Wonder Writers and co-sponsored by CBU’s sociology and criminal justice programs.

 

Family Updates

Dr. Jong-Wha Bai

Dr. Jong-Wha Bai

Dr. Jong-Wha Bai, associate professor of civil engineering, has been licensed as a professional civil engineer by California’s Board for Professional Engineers, Land Surveyors and Geologists.

 

 

 

 

 

Dr. Monica O'Rourke

Dr. Monica O’Rourke

Dr. Monica O’Rourke, associate professor of kinesiology for Online and Professional Studies, served with Team Faith Racing Ministry on the International Jet Sports Boating Association (IJSBA) Pro Watercross Tour in Panama City Beach, Fla., May 15-18. The group provided ministry and church services to professional watercraft athletes.

 

 

 

 

Rebecca Sanchez

Rebecca Sanchez

Rebecca Sanchez, director of financial aid, has been appointed as a member of the Commission for Financial Aid Administrators with the Council for Christian Colleges & Universities (CCCU). During her three-year appointment, she will assist with the professional development, legislative issues and surveys for financial aid administrators at CCCU institutions.

 

 

 

Dr. Franco Gandolfi

Dr. Franco Gandolfi

Dr. Franco Gandolfi, dean of the Dr. Robert K. Jabs School of Business, wrote an article titled The Significance of the Psychological Contract for Organizational Downsizing, which was recently published in The Journal of American Business Review.

 

 

 

 

 

RolleHainzer

From left: Stephen Rolle and Steven Hainzer

CBU ROTC cadets Steven Hainzer and Stephen Rolle were commissioned as second lieutenants in a commissioning ceremony at Claremont McKenna College on May 17. Both men majored in civil engineering and  will serve as engineer officers: Hainzer in the U.S. Army Reserve and Rolle in the U.S. Army.

 

 

 

 

 

kminesin1314.png

Ken Minesinger

Ken Minesinger

Ken Minesinger, associate professor of law in Online and Professional Studies, gave a presentation on health care reform to the Inland Empire Chapter of the Institute of Management Accountants on May 15.

 

 

 

 

 

From left: Sandy’s husband, Jeff; Ashleigh; Sandy; and Savannah Bachar. Ashley and Savannah are sophomores at CBU.

From left: Sandy’s husband, Jeff; Ashleigh; Sandy; and Savannah Bachar. Ashley and Savannah are sophomores at CBU.

Sandy Bachar, administrative assistant for the vice president for global initiatives, received the master of arts degree in public relations during CBU’s commencement services on May 3.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Front row: Jared Dobbins, Tracy Ward, Lisa Bursch, Doreen Ferko, Kristen White, Lisa Hernandez; back row: DawnEllen Jacobs, Geneva Oaks, Rebecca Meyer, Chris McHorney, Tom Ferko

Front row: Jared Dobbins, Tracy Ward, Lisa Bursch, Doreen Ferko, Kristen White, Lisa Hernandez; back row: DawnEllen Jacobs, Geneva Oaks, Rebecca Meyer, Chris McHorney, Tom Ferko

Eleven CBU faculty and staff members attended the annual conference of University Educators for Global Engagement (UEGE) held in Richmond, Va. April 10-13. The theme was Foundations of Globally Engaged Communities.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

20140425_150540_resized

From left: Ash Melika, Julie Goodman and Dr. Bruce Stokes

Julie  Goodman, assistant professor of anthropology, Ash Melika, associate professor of archaeology/anthropology, and Dr. Bruce Stokes, professor of anthropology and behavioral sciences, attended the Southwest Anthropological Association Conference held in Garden Grove, Calif.  April 25-26. The theme, Imagineering the Present: Technology and Creativity attracted discussions about the growing relationship between technology and humanity. Several universities in California, Nevada, Arizona, and Texas were represented. Goodman chaired two sessions, including a panel for prospective graduate students and a poster session for displaying current anthropological research projects. She was also reelected to the SWAA board, this term in the office of secretary.  Melika presented a paper titled The Materialization of Ancient Egyptian Kinship Ideology in the New Kingdom.

 

 

 

 

Jacquie Lutz

Jacquie Lutz

Jacquie Lutz, a graduate student in CBU’s Dr.Bonnie G. Metcalf School of Education, competed in the Sendai (Japan) Half-Marathon, with a time of 1 hour 40 minutes. Lutz placed in the top 200 female runners out of 1,000. Sendai is a sister city to Riverside.

 

 

 

 

Dr. Mary Ann Pearson

Dr. Mary Ann Pearson

Dr. Mary Ann Pearson, associate professor of public relations in Online and Professional Studies, recently passed the computer based exam for Accreditation in Public Relations (APR), a designation by the Public Relations Society of America (PRSA). To qualify to take the test, Pearson completed an oral review conducted by a panel of PRSA professionals.

 

 

 

 

Dr. Bob Namvar

Dr. Bob Namvar

Dr. Bob Namvar, professor of economics, wrote an article titled How Does a Post Keynesian Fiscal Policy Help the Sluggish U.S. Economy? which was published in the recent issue of International Journal of Economics & Social Science.

 

 

 

 

From left: Shane and Asher Kong

From left: Shane and Asher Kong

Bryant Kong, director of international admissions, and his wife, Hyoyung Yoon, welcomed twin sons on April 29. Shane Kong was born at 1:15 p.m. weighing 4 lbs. 12 ozs., and Asher Kong was born a minute later weighing 5 lbs. 6 ozs.

 

 

 

 

 

Personnel Updates

DATE DEPARTMENT POSITION NAME STATUS
5/16/2014 Campus Store Cashier Keith Jizmejian New Hire
5/19/2014 Marketing and Communication Public Relations Specialist Vivian Quezada New Hire
5/19/2014 School of Nursing Director of Nursing Admissions Ashley Sonke New Hire
5/27/2014 Institutional Advancement Grants Administrator Penny Jobe New Hire
5/30/2014 Enrollment Services Undergraduate Admissions Counselor/Recruiter Taylor Allen New Hire
5/16/2014 Residence Life Residence Director Heather Logan No Longer Employed
5/15/2014 Tahquitz Pines Camp Worker-On Call Mariah Benson No Longer Employed
5/19/2014 Public Safety Bus Driver Bruce Abbe No Longer Employed
5/19/2014 Public Safety Bus Driver James Grant No Longer Employed
5/19/2014 Public Safety Bus Driver Richard Matthews No Longer Employed
5/20/2014 Athletics Assistant Softball Coach Taryne Mowatt No Longer Employed

May 15, 2014

Before gathering around the Kugel to pray, volunteers asked for support as they serve others in their designated field of service.

In this issue…

Current News

CBU sends first wave of volunteers to global fields of service

Before gathering around the Kugel to pray, volunteers asked for support as they serve others in their designated field of service.

Before gathering around the Kugel to pray, volunteers asked for support as they serve others in their designated                       field of service.

California Baptist University sent 16 volunteer teams to their respective fields of service around the world this week, in the 2014 season’s first wave of International Service Projects (ISP), United States Projects (USP) and Summer of Service (SOS).

In all, 45 teams will serve in 16 countries, with more than 400 participants involved. Groups departed May 6 and 7 for East Asia, South Asia, Southeast Asia and Italy.

As they left the campus, each team gathered to pray at the Kugel, a 10-ton granite globe that rests on a base inscribed with the Great Commission (Matt. 28:19-20).

“We’re about men and women called to be world Christians,” said Jared Dobbins, assistant director of mobilization. “Our preparation this year has been based on the theme Stand: Stand on, stand up and stand fast.”

Each volunteer goes through more than 75 hours of training to prepare for service opportunities, including an Intensive Training Weekend that simulate overseas situations. Of this year’s more than 400 students and team leaders, 73 percent are participating for the first time.

“Please pray that we will be effective as we work with our people group,” one volunteer asked family and friends. “Pray that God will use us at every opportunity.”

 

CBU wins second PacWest Commissioner’s Cup

PacWest genericWith the California Baptist University baseball team grabbing a 9-3 win over Azusa Pacific Monday afternoon, the Lancers clinched their second PacWest Commissioner’s Cup in only their third year in the conference.

It was one of the closest races in conference history, as the Lancers became just the second school in the conference, along with Hawai’i Pacific, to win the Commissioner’s Cup twice. With a 12.500 average, the Lancers edged out conference-rival Azusa Pacific (12.455) for the top spot in the standings.

“Winning the Commissioner’s cup for the second time in three years is quite an accomplishment,” CBU Athletic Director Micah Parker said. “Our coaches have done a tremendous job of recruiting and then developing those players into cohesive teams.  I’m proud of all the hard work our athletes, coaches and staff put in this year.”

CBU took home three conference championships this year, in men’s cross country, men’s basketball and softball. The Lancers also had top-three finishes in all of the seven other Cup-eligible sports to secure the award.

BYU-Hawaii finished in third place, knocking off Hawai’i Pacific, while Dixie State rounded out the top-five schools in the Cup standings.

Since not every team in the conference sponsors the same sports, the PacWest Commissioner’s Cup Standings are based upon average finish instead of point totals. Each school’s points are totaled and then divided by the number of PacWest athletic programs it offers, giving an overall average finish for the school.

This marks the second Commissioner’s Cup for CBU, after the Lancers took the title their first year in the conference two years ago. Last year, CBU came up just shy of a back-to-back first place finish.

The PacWest Commissioner’s Cup Scoring System awards points to schools based on their finishes in conference-sponsored sports. Regular-season standings are used for baseball, basketball, soccer, softball and volleyball, while the results of the conference championships in the sports of cross country, golf and tennis.

 

Record number of graduates honored at spring commencement

commencementDr. Ronald L. Ellis, president of California Baptist University, congratulated 1,335 graduating students during afternoon and evening commencement ceremonies at Citizens Business Bank Arena in Ontario. Afternoon exercises included 683 traditional undergraduate degree candidates, while the evening ceremony honored 649 students, including all master’s degree candidates, as well as undergraduates from Online and Professional Studies programs.

“Each of these graduating students has arrived at this point because of a shared commitment to the challenging yet rewarding endeavor of higher education,” Ellis said. “Each one has overcome obstacles to achieve this goal.”

Dr. E. Bruce Heilman, chancellor of The University of Richmond, challenged students with an address he titled You may not know where you are going until you get there so don’t be surprised if you end up some place else.

“We, of my era, lived under circumstances which made truth out of this descriptive title,” he said.

Heilman, whose great uncle was one of California Baptist College’s founders, earned B.A., M.A. and Ph.D. degrees from Vanderbilt University in the fields of business and education administration and served in various positions at Kentucky Wesleyan College, Georgetown College and Peabody College. He became chancellor at the University of Richmond in 1988, after serving as president and chief executive officer for 17 years. At 88, he said he still rides his Harley-Davidson motorcycle and considers age to be only a place on the calendar.

“Keep on learning so that you will be prepared to accept what God-given opportunity may come your way,” he said. “Above all, do something of which you will be proud and which serves mankind. And don’t quit living to the fullest at whatever age you find yourselves. Life isn’t over until it’s over. Keep your bucket list long and full.

Ellis conferred upon Heilman an honorary degree of doctor of arts and humane letters in recognition of his contributions and achievements.

Awards for student achievement were presented at both ceremonies. Stephany Durksen, a liberal studies major from Canada, received the Min Sung Kim International Student Award, and Kari Carlson, an accounting major from Evergreen, Colo. received CBU’s Outstanding Senior Award. Karen Joy, financial administrator for Loveland Church, which has multiple locations in California, was honored with the Outstanding Online and Professional Studies Student Award.

Combined with the 327 students who graduated last December, the Class of 2014 included 1,662 degree applications, the largest number of candidates for graduation for a single year in CBU’s history.

 

Family Updates

This photo was taken during the event with a cell phone camera pointed at the eyepiece of a telescope.

This photo was taken during the event with a cell phone camera pointed at the eyepiece of a telescope.

CBU students joined Dr. Kyle Stewart, assistant professor of physics, his astronomy class and the math club on the Front Lawn to watch the total lunar eclipse on April 14-15 from 11 p.m. to 2 a.m.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Three North High students analyzing the evidence they collected during Forensic Science Day.

North High students analyze the evidence they collected during Forensic Science Day.

Students from the Law Enforcement and Protective Services Academy at John W. North High School participated in Forensic Science Day, hosted by CBU’s department of natural and mathematical sciences, on May 6. Dr. John Higley, associate professor of criminal justice, helped the 39 students process the “crime scene” and collect evidence to solve the case of the missing mammoth molecules. The students then analyzed their evidence in the chemistry lab, with the assistance of Dr. Tom Ferko, professor of chemistry, and several chemistry and biochemistry and molecular biology majors.

 

 

 

 

Dr. Seung-Jae Kim

Dr. Seung-Jae Kim

Dr. Seung-Jae Kim, associate professor of mechanical engineering and bioengineering, is co-author of an article titled Effect of Explicit Visual Feedback Distortion on Human Gait, which was published in the April issue of Journal of NeuroEngineering and Rehabilitation.

 

 

 

Phil Martinez

Phil Martinez

Phil Martinez, director of assessment, made a poster presentation titled University-level Assessment and Program Review Reporting at the Western Association of Schools and Colleges (WASC) Academic Resource Conference, which met April 23-25 in Los Angeles.

 

 

 

AlumniLogoAs of April 28, 2014, membership to the Alumni Association is free and open to all CBU graduates in good standing. This change was made possible because of a generous donation from an anonymous alumnus who wanted to help provide equal benefits to all alumni. To take advantage of these benefits, alumni in good standing will need to show an Alumni Association card.  Cards are being mailed to 2014 graduates, and alumni from previous years may request a card through the Alumni Office at alumni@calbaptist.edu or (951) 343-4439.

 

IA photoMore than 300 CBU students, parents, alumni, faculty, staff, trustees, families and friends attended the inaugural CBU Night at Angels Stadium on April 15. Guests were treated to a pre-game reception featuring game-time favorites including hot dogs, Cracker Jacks, peanuts and more. Everyone in attendance received a CBU t-shirt, an Albert Pujols blanket, and because the group was seated in the Trout Farm, everyone received Trout hats and boom sticks. To view the photo gallery, click here.

 

 

 

 

Dr. Mark Kling

Dr. Mark Kling

Dr. Mark Kling, assistant professor of criminal justice and public administration for Online and Professional Studies, presented an executive management topic titled Ethical Dilemmas in the Workplace: Tools to Strengthen Employee Decision Making and Behavior at a meeting for County of Riverside Fiscal Managers April 28 in Riverside. He also presented a case study and introduced ethical tools to assist management level executives in preventing unethical employee behavior.

 

 

 

Dr. Matthew Rickard

Dr. Matthew Rickard

Dr. Matthew Rickard, associate professor and interim chair of bioengineering, made a poster presentation May 6 at ARVO 2014, the largest gathering of eye and vision researchers in the world, which met in Orlando, Fla. The poster was titled Time-Related Reduction in Ahmed Valve Flow Resistance: A Six-Month Study Using a Novel In Vitro Pulsatile Perfusion Apparatus. The abstract is available by clicking here.

 

 

 

 

Bryden Lazaro

Bryden Lazaro

CBU All-American grappler Bryden Lazaro was featured in an article on NCAA’s website about his perseverance through a knee injury that occurred the day before the team left for NCAA competition. Lazaro finished in 5th place. The article is   available by clicking here.

 

 

 

 

Stephen Christie

Stephen Christie

Stephen Christie, assistant professor of accounting and finance, was honored as Outstanding Faculty of the Year for 2013-14 at the Dr. Robert K. Jabs School of Business faculty/staff workshop, which was held May 7 at the Hyatt Place in Riverside.

 

 

 

 

 

Dr. Marc Weniger

Dr. Marc Weniger

Dr. Marc Weniger, assistant professor of business, presented research titled Atmospheric Lifting Phenomenon and Associated Turbulence at the Southern California Balloon Association Safety Seminar for commercial and private hot air balloon pilots and crew, which met May 3 in Riverside.

 

 

 

Dr. Ben Gall

Dr. Ben Gall

Dr. Ben Gall, head men’s and women’s cross country/track coach, wrote an article titled Ties That Bind: Developing Relationships Cultivates Winning Results, which was published in the May issue of Techniques Magazine, a publication for the U.S. Track & Field and Cross Country Coaches Association. Click here to view the online version of the magazine.

 

 

 

 

Kyle and Sarah Smith with their new son, Bram

Kyle and Sarah Smith
with their new son, Bram

Kyle Smith, assistant director of the Recreation Center, and his wife Sarah, a CBU alumna, welcomed a son on April 28. Abram Dean Smith was born at 7:58 a.m., weighing 6 lbs. 2 oz. and measuring 18 ½ inches long.

 

 

 

 

 

Kennedy Hope McDonald

Kennedy Hope McDonald

Lisa McDonald, administrative assistant in the School of Education, and her husband, Mike, welcomed their first grandchild, a granddaughter, on April 18. Kennedy Hope McDonald weighed 5 lbs. 11 ozs. and measured 18 inches long. She lives with her parents, Kevin and Kadee McDonald, in Beaumont, Calif.

 

 

 

 

Personnel Updates

DATE DEPARTMENT POSITION NAME STATUS
4/28/2014 International Center Receptionist Shellyn Beltran New Hire
5/12/2014 Enrollment Services Undergraduate Admissions Counselor/Recruiter Austin Boaman New Hire
5/1/2014 School of Nursing Assistant Professor Susan Jetton             (formerly Nelson) Name Change
5/2/2014 Institutional Advancement Gift Administrator Laura Linos               (formerly Stump) Name Change
5/9/2014 Athletics Assistant Men’s Volleyball Coach Allan Vince No Longer Employed
5/2/2014 School of Education Program Advisor/Clinical Coordinator Cherlyn Johnson No Longer Employed

April 30, 2014

Dr. Ronald L. Ellis and Kim Cunningham

In this issue…

Current News

CBU commencement ceremonies to be held May 3

2013-12-13-chute-fall commencement-0022California Baptist University will host its undergraduate and graduate commencement ceremonies on Saturday, May 3, at the Citizens Business Bank Arena in Ontario, Calif.

The ceremony for traditional undergraduates will be held at 2 p.m., while students from graduate programs and Online and Professional Studies (OPS) will be honored at 7 p.m.

Dr. E. Bruce Heilman, chancellor of the University of Richmond (Va.), will speak at both commencement ceremonies.

Due to the large number of graduates participating in the traditional undergraduate service, tickets will be required. Each graduate has received 11 tickets to accommodate friends and family members. Doors will open at 12:45.

Tickets are not required for the graduate and OPS ceremony, and doors will open at 5:45 p.m

Seats may not be reserved or held for guests at either ceremony. Concessions will be open for guests to purchase drinks and food; flowers will also be available at the arena for purchase.

Parking is complimentary. For directions to Citizens Business Bank Arena, click here.

 

Family Updates

 

Dr. Ronald L. Ellis and Kim Cunningham

Dr. Ronald L. Ellis and Kim Cunningham

Kim Cunningham, manager of donor relations and stewardship, is the Employee of the month for May. Her nomination form included the following statements: “We are able to count on Kim to contribute to the success of our efforts, no matter the time of day, nor day of the week… she is there to serve.  No one receives more kind words about how they treat visitors and old friends than Kim does.  A person is never a “customer” for Kim as her warmth is quick to transform a new customer into a new friend.  Kim’s performance is consistent, although her routine NEVER is.  She is able to multi-task with the greats.  To be able to excel at multiple areas is difficult, but Kim has the talent and the outstanding attitude to make it look easy.”

 

 

 

Dr. Chuck Sands

Dr. Chuck Sands

Dr. Chuck Sands, dean of the College of Allied Health, was recently appointed to the Riverside STEM Academy Advisory Board.

 

 

 

 

From left, front row: Stephanie Wallace, Jessica Ball, Tsz Yan Chung, Brooke Edwards, Lindsay Vesling, Rita Knarreborg, Jennifer Archuleta and Taylor Canetsey; back row: Daniel Valadez, Leonard Rooney, Michael Bueti and Matthew Smitley

From left, front row: Stephanie Wallace, Jessica Ball, Tsz Yan Chung, Brooke Edwards, Lindsay Vesling, Rita Knarreborg, Jennifer Archuleta and Taylor Canetsey; back row: Daniel Valadez, Leonard Rooney, Michael Bueti and Matthew Smitley

More than 25 health sciences and kinesiology undergraduate and graduate students presented research at the College of Allied Health’s Student Research Symposium on April 22.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Photo by Jonica Ladrido, senior health education major

Photo by Jonica Ladrido, senior health education major

The College of Allied Health partnered with various departments and community organizations to host a weeklong awareness campaign on the CBU campus April 7-11. Participating organizations included the department of health sciences’ master of public health program, the department of kinesiology’s exercise science and athletic training programs, the CBU Recreation Center, the CBU Counseling Center, CBU graduate admissions, Riverside Community Health Foundation, the American Heart Association and the California Southern Baptist Convention Disaster Relief. Each day focused on one of five themes, providing information to students, faculty and staff. Activities included balance and strength testing, first aid and CPR training and demonstrations, smoothie and fresh juice demonstrations, volunteer sign-ups for disaster relief training and nutrition trivia contests.

 

More than 100 people attended the School of Christian Ministries’ 2nd Annual Philosophy and Apologetics Conference at CBU April 11-12. The conference theme was Embodied Reason: Wisdom, Tradition and Contemporary Apologetics and was presented in partnership with Golden Gate Baptist Theological Seminary and Apologetics.com. Dr. Todd Bates, professor of philosophy, coordinated and directed the conference, and Dr. Kevin Vanhoozer of the Trinity Evangelical Divinity School was the plenary speaker. More than 30 academic papers were presented by scholars from the U.S. and Canada. Presenters from CBU included Dr. Scott Key, professor of philosophy, whose paper was titled Toward an Epistemology of Value, and Luke Stamps, assistant professor of Christian ministries in Online and Professional Studies, whose paper was titled Honored by Silence: Gregory Nazianzen and the Limits of Theological Speculation. During the undergraduate paper session, Juan Galiana, a CBU student, was honored for the most outstanding paper, which was titled The Effects of Friedrich Wilhelm Nietzsche on Politics, Philosophy, and Religion.

 

resolution-2CBU’s Male Chorale was honored by the California State Assembly for their “outstanding performance and support of our military during the Patriots of the Past, Present and Future Recognition Ceremony” March 14 in Redlands. Sen. Mike Morrell of Redlands commented that “watching veterans proudly standing, singing, saluting and clapping during the rendition of each song was an honor to see. I was told by many family members of veterans who attended that it was a particularly moving experience watching our World War II, Korea and Vietnam vets clapping and singing along to their anthem with the vigor and youth of yesteryear. The hangar was filled with voices in song, cheerful boasts and the smiles of proud veterans. The impact this event had on our veterans was evident and inspired not only our veterans but our youth.”

 

 

Dr. Monica O'Rourke

Dr. Monica O’Rourke

 

Dr. Monica O’Rourke, associate professor of kinesiology for Online and Professional Studies, was the motivational speaker at California State University, Fullerton’s department of kinesiology teaching seminar on April 15. O’Rourke shared her testimony and spoke on standards-based quality physical education and best pedagogical practices in public and private schools.

 

 

 

Dr. Linn Carothers

Dr. Linn Carothers

Dr.  Linn Carothers, program director of math and physics, represented CBU at the Extreme Science and Engineering Discovery Environment (XSEDE) workshop at California State University, San Bernardino on April 3 and 4. The conference and workshops trained and activated access for CBU researchers to a $121 million dollar National Science Foundation funded project that provides more than 16 supercomputers, visualization and data analysis systems and tools, as well as large dataset collections across the U.S. at no cost to researchers. Researchers interested in collaborative studies using high performance computing are encouraged to contact Carothers as campus coordinator of access to XSEDE at extension 4961.

 

 

Dr. Timothy Mosteller

Dr. Timothy Mosteller

Dr. Timothy Mosteller, associate professor of philosophy, presented a response to a paper at the American Philosophy Association, Pacific Division meeting in San Diego April 19. His presentation title was A Reply to Nate Jackson’s ‘The Vagueness of Theistic Interpretations of William James’ Pluralism’.

 

 

 

 

Kushi Jones

Kushi Jones

Mike Bishop

Mike Bishop

Kushi Jones, director of CBU’s Career Center, served as an evaluator for an exhibition of students’ senior projects at John W. North High School in Riverside on April 24. In addition, Jones and Mike Bishop, associate director of the Career Center, served as mock interviewers for seniors at Martin Luther King High School on April 14. The program was hosted by the Riverside Unified School District WorkAbility Program.

 

 

 

 

Pierce BenlianPierce Benlian (shown at center in the photo), applied statistics major, presented a poster titled Pi Between the Lines at the 2014 Spring Southern California-Nevada Mathematical Association of America Sectional Meeting in Irvine on April 12.

 

 

 

Dr. Mary Crist

Dr. Mary Crist

Dr. Mary Crist, professor of education in OPS, and her husband, the Rev. Will Crist, an OPS graduate student, conducted Easter services for native congregations in the Alaska villages of Huslia and Hughes. They have ministered to native congregations in the interior since 2005. Mary is shown dressed for Christmas when the high temperature was 40 degrees below zero. In contrast, the high temperature for Easter was 40 degrees above.

 

 

 

Dr. Anthony Chute

Dr. Anthony Chute

Dr. Anthony Chute, associate dean of the School of Christian Ministries, was elected vice-president of the Evangelical Theological Society-Far West Region, during the group’s annual meeting on April 11. In that capacity, Chute will coordinate the 2015 meeting of the organization on the CBU campus.

 

 

 

Kyle Smith

Kyle Smith

Kyle Smith, assistant director of the Recreation Center, was recently awarded a scholarship through Star Trac to attend the National Intramural-Recreational Sports Association (NIRSA) and was featured in their promotional video.

 

 

 

Sandra Romo

Sandra Romo

Sandra Romo, assistant professor of journalism, presented a paper titled Arriving at a New Normal: Married Couples Adjust to Their Child’s Diagnosis of Autism at the National Social Science Association Meeting, which met in Las Vegas April 13-15.

 

 

 

ASCECBU’s American Society of Civil Engineers (ASCE) student chapter participated in the Pacific South West Conference 2014 in San Diego April 3-5. Forty-three CBU students competed against 17 other schools in 18 events including the steel bridge competition and sports activities. CBU teams placed fourth in the steel bridge competition; first in volleyball for the second year in a row; third in Kan-jam, a flying disc game; and fourth in the steel bridge competition. They also received two other awards in the steel bridge competition: third in both the stiffness and efficiency categories.

 

 

Jingxing Joseph Jr. Zhou

Jingxing Joseph Jr. Zhou

Dr. Ying (Hannah) Hu, assistant professor of chemistry, and her husband, Dapeng Zhou, welcomed their third child, Jingxing Joseph Jr. Zhou, on April 3. He weighed 7 lbs. 14 oz. and measured 20 inches long.

 

 

 

 

Phoenix Rose Council

Phoenix Rose Council

Cameron Council, customer support analyst II in information and technology services, and his wife, Micah, welcomed their first child, a daughter named Phoenix Rose Council, at 12:50 p.m. on April 22. She weighed 8 lbs. 12 ozs.

 

 

 

 

 

Personnel Updates

DATE DEPARTMENT POSITION NAME STATUS
4/22/2014 Department of Health Science Secretary Lisa Schwartz New Hire
4/22/2014 Campus Store Assistant Manager of Operations Greg Reardon New Hire
4/22/2014 Information and Technology Services Web Application Developer Robert “Rob” McIntire New Hire
4/22/2014 Information and Technology Services Network and Systems Administrator Manuel Encarnacion New Hire
4/21/2014 Enrollment Services Associate Director of Undergraduate Admissions Jonathan McWhorter Change
4/25/2014 Communication Arts Theatre Shop Foreman Jonathon Meader No Longer Employed