A newsletter for faculty and staff of California Baptist University

February 25, 2015

HR chart

In this issue…

Current News

The Hiding Place production resumes this weekend

From left: Sarah Gorton, Haley Prizzi, Kiana Miskel, Jacob Nye, Samantha Cockrell, Joshua Hoefling are almost caught by a window washer during prayer before dinner in “The Hiding Place.” (Photo by Jessica Bills)

From left: Sarah Gorton, Haley Prizzi, Kiana Miskel, Jacob Nye, Samantha Cockrell, Joshua Hoefling are almost caught by a window washer during prayer before dinner in “The Hiding Place.” (Photo by Jessica Bills)

California Baptist University’s production of The Hiding Place will continue this Thursday, Feb. 26, and end on Saturday, Feb. 28.

The play tells the story of Corrie ten Boom and her family, who lived under the shadow of World War II Nazism. The ten Boom family lead lives of service, providing a hiding place for people fleeing the Nazis. The story takes the audience from a cozy clock shop in Haarlem, Holland, to the nightmare of the Ravensbruck concentration camp and back to hope again.

Frank Mihelich, director of the production and assistant professor of theatre, remembers reading the book in high school and staying up all night to read it.

“It’s just a compelling story,” he said. “We want to start inclusive conversations about faith, so we want to tell stories that are either dead-on about the gospel or just about humanity.”

Kiana Miskel, a junior theatre major, plays Corrie ten Boom.

“I think the biggest challenge that I have faced with playing this role is the fear of failing to give justice to such an incredible human being and tell her story the way that it needs to be told,” she said. “Being able to hear what these people went through at one of the darkest times in our history and were still able to put their faith and trust in Christ through it all has been so inspiring.”

She said the issues the play presents aren’t difficult to handle, but they are emotionally draining.

“I think it is worth it to really tap into what these people went through at that time,” she said. “It is an important story to be told, and I am proud to be a part of this beautiful production.

Corrie’s faith also touched Mihelich.

“The thing that struck me the most, even when I read the book when I was a kid, was that she had that slogan, and it appears in the play – ‘there is no pit so deep that Jesus is not deeper yet,’” he said. “Light shines the brightest in darkness.”

“I think often about my first-world problems – my latte isn’t hot,” he added.

Performances began Feb. 20 and will resume Thursday, Feb. 26, through Saturday, Feb. 28, with performances each evening at 7:30 p.m. and a 2 p.m. Saturday matinee. General admission tickets are $15, with discounts offered for matinees, senior citizens and CBU students, faculty, staff and alumni.

For more information or to purchase tickets, call the Wallace Theatre box office at 951-343-4319.

 

Sitcom actor Jim O’Heir comes to CBU campus

Jim O'Heir

Jim O’Heir

California Baptist University students took a break from homework Feb. 17 to watch the next-to-last episodes of the NBC comedy “Parks and Recreations” live with cast member Jim O’Heir, who plays the character of Jerry Gergich.

O’Heir was invited by longtime friend Dr. Jim Buchholz, professor of mathematics and physics, who planned the event for the College of Architecture, Visual Arts and Design.

The event consisted of an hour-long interview performed by Buchholz in front of a packed auditorium followed by a question and answer period. O’Heir then watched two new episodes with the students while meeting and greeting fans in the process.

During the interview, O’Heir began by discussing his decision in taking on the role of Jerry. His agents opposed his joining the cast for fear that he may not get many lines and become an extra on the set.

“To me it was such a no brainer. These were the people who created Phyllis from ‘The Office’ and Stanley,” he said. “I thought, if only that could happen to me … and it did.”

O’Heir talked about the day-to-day life on the set.

“I have been on many shows over the years, and some sets are tough to be on,” he said. “People don’t talk, people don’t get along. There was never an argument on the set of ‘Parks and Recreations’ in 125 episodes. They are just all great people and we all meshed.”

O’Heir discussed the show coming to an end. He and the rest of the cast will appear on “Late Night with Seth Meyers” after the series finale Feb. 24.

“It was tough. We still text every day. It’s like we can’t break away yet,” he said. “I have the feeling when we do Seth Meyers next week it will be an even tougher goodbye, because that will be the last grouping of us.”

“The meet and greet was great,” said Austin Robinson, a business administration junior. “He was engaging the audience with jokes.”

Although “Parks and Recreations” is coming to an end, O’Heir has big plans for his future. Currently, he is raising funds for a new project titled “Middleman,” a dark comedy in which he plays the lead role.

 

Runners hit their stride in 5th annual Lancer 5000

Participants in the Lancer 5000 cross the finish line.

Participants in the Lancer 5000 cross the finish line.

More than 300 runners and walkers participated in the 5th annual Lancer 5000 on the campus of California Baptist University Feb. 14.

Organized by CBU’s track and cross country program and sponsored by Lexus of Riverside, the event featured a 1K Kiddie Run at 7:30 a.m., followed by the 5K at 8 a.m. Awards were presented to the top participants in each age group, and the top three overall male and female runners were honored. Proceeds went to the CBU cross country and track program.

The top three male runners were Tyler Janes, who ran a time of 15:17.110, followed by Gabe Hernandez with 15:22.594 and Matthew Klein with 15:37.924. The top three female runners were Jennifer Sandoval, who ran a time of 18:18.297, followed by Emily Sanchez with 19:15.444 and Cassandra Boyd with 19:23.147.

“I saw all the older guys, and I wasn’t sure (about my chances),” said Janes, a junior at Martin Luther King High School in Riverside. “But when I got out on the track I felt good, and I decided to go for it towards the end.”

“It was a very challenging and fun course,” Klein said. “It was a beautiful day to run, and I’m very happy that we had some of the fastest high school runners (participating).”

A raffle awarded prizes ranging from gift cards to theme park passes. The event also featured a free breakfast sponsored by Chick-fil-A and free massages provided by Corona Physical Medicine.

“We were excited with the turnout,” said Sean Henning, assistant cross country and track coach and race director. “Having this many people come out and support is great. We hope to grow the event and make it bigger each year.”

Results by age division included:

0-10 Division: Jennifer Lopez: 20:26.764; Markow Allura: 21:19.664; Sanchez Dhannasshy: 25:44.334; Blake Moore: 47:56.580

11-14 Division: Caitlin Miller: 20:54.177; Lanie Schemenauer: 21:11.674; Joelle Ramos: 21:16.014; Jordi Peiro: 17:40.304; Edgar Gonzalez: 17:41.600; Jacob Moran: 18:08.707

15-19 Division: Valeria Ramirez: 19:28.477; Julie Diaz: 19:51.837; Kathryn Hammar: 20:05.074; Rolando Phalen: 15:46.197; Daniel Gonzalez: 16:00.444; Erik Gonzalez: 16:02.994

20-29 Division: Jacqueline Lutz: 20:37.450; Stephanie Curnow: 23:06.394; Melissa Booth: 23:23.180;Justin Wireman: 16:01.737; Antonio Sanchez: 16:31.037; Zachary Oliver: 16:44.034

30-39 Division: Erin Pope: 24:37.970; Andrea Morey: 26:52.667; Jacqui Contreras: 26:54.074; Isaac Gallardo: 19:24.790; Moses Vasquez: 20:13.014: Josh Morey: 21:02.547

40-49 Division: Beatrice Avila: 24:09.254; May Dai: 25:20.177; Georgette Chavez 25:30.994; Victor Garcia: 18:41.790; Brad Peters: 20:08.530; Paul Avila: 21:54.077

50-59 Division: Lisa Sherman: 23:31.214; Sandy Whitt: 26:21.517; Beth Thomas: 27:13.910; Neil Smart: 18:28.614; Andrew Benavidez: 20:16.424; Fredrick Martinez: 22:38.154

60-69 Division: Carolyn Greywood: 26:46.087; Vicki Snyder: 30:02.854; Tanya Mauldin: 39:06.907; Jeffrey Kinzel: 21:18.350; Stephen Posegate: 24:49.454; Isamu Long: 28:56:580

70 – 95 Division: Linda Lang: 46:04.807; Madeline Stilwell: 46:35.354; Bill Kennedy: 32:00.410; Robert Stilwell: 55:42.620

 

Family Updates

Dr. Charles Sands

Dr. Charles Sands

Dr. Charles Sands, dean of the College of Allied Health, presented Introduction to the College of Allied Health to the Riverside Sunrise Rotary Club on Feb. 13.

 

 

 

 

Dr. Candace Vickers at ASHA headquarters

Dr. Candace Vickers at ASHA headquarters

Dr. Candace Vickers, associate professor of communication disorders, chaired the Ad Hoc Committee on the International Classification of Functioning, Health and Disability (ICF) at the American Speech Language Hearing Association executive offices in Rockville, Md. in early February. ICF is a classification framework from the World Health Organization. The purpose of the committee is to find ways to help the national membership use the framework during assessment and treatment of clients. Members of the committee were scholars from the U.S., Australia and Canada, representing the fields of audiology and speech language pathology.

 

 

 

Dr. Beverly Howard

Dr. Beverly Howard

Dr. Beverly Howard, professor of music, has had two recent publications. Streams of Song: Developing a New Hymnal for the Presbyterian Church (USA) is a chapter in the new text The Changing World Religion Map: Sacred Places, Identities, Practices, and Politics, published by Springer Press. She also co-authored a six-week Adult Lenten study, Will You Come and Follow Me, published by The Thoughtful Christian, an online ecumenical resource center sponsored by Westminister John Knox Press.

 

 

 

Dr. William Flores with his plaque of appreciation.

Dr. William Flores, associate professor of Spanish, made a presentation titled Strategies for the Teaching of Literature at the Undergraduate Level: A Didactic Proposal at the Annual Conference of the Association of Teachers of Spanish and Portuguese (AATSP) held at CBU on Feb. 7. Flores also was recognized for his service as president of the AATSP-Roger Anton Chapter. In addition, Ruth Flores, lecturer of English for Online & Professional Studies, made a presentation titled Three Ways to Engage and Inspire Your Students in the Fully Online Elementary Spanish Classroom at the conference.

 

 

 

 

 

Kenneth George

Kenneth George

Kenneth George, assistant professor of finance for Online and Professional Studies, served as a judge for the Christian Speech and Debate Tournament Feb. 21 at Immanuel Baptist Church in Highland. The tournament was sponsored by Stoa, a national high school and junior high speech and debate organization serving the needs of Christian homeschooling families.

 

 

 

 

Gavin and Jennifer Andrew with their sons, Calvin Jay and Everett Joseph.

Gavin and Jennifer Andrew with their sons, Calvin Jay and Everett Joseph.

Gavin Andrew, graduate admissions counselor, and his wife Jennifer welcomed their second son on Feb. 8. Everett Joseph Andrew weighed 8 lbs. 10 ozs. and measured 21 inches. His brother, Calvin Jay Andrew, is 2.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Courtney Janae Billingsley (right) is the daughter of Samantha Greer, department secretary in facilities and planning services.

Courtney Janae Billingsley (right) is the daughter of Samantha Greer, department secretary in facilities and planning services. She is pictured with her dad, Kevin Greer.

Courtney Janae Billingsley and her partner won first place at the Riverside Unified School District Science and Engineering Fair, with her project Proving Faraday’s Law. She will compete in the RIMS Inland Science and Engineering Fair April 6-7 at the National Orange Show in San Bernardino. Billingsley is the daughter of Samantha Greer, department secretary in facilities and planning services.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Personnel Updates

HR chart

February 13, 2015

The top ranking students at Mathcounts are honored at an awards ceremony at the conclusion of the event.

In this issue…

Current News

CBU professor selected for Oxford project

Dr. Erin Smith

Dr. Erin Smith

Dr. Erin Smith, assistant professor of psychology, has been selected as one of 25 participants for the Bridging the Two Cultures of Science and the Humanities project during the next two summers in Oxford, England.

The announcement came from Scholarship & Christianity in Oxford (SCIO), the United Kingdom Centre of the Council for Christian Colleges and Universities. The organization is a research and educational institute in Oxford, producing and supporting scholarship in a recognized center of international educational and scholarly excellence.

Funded by the Templeton Religion Trust, the program fosters in participants the interdisciplinary skills and understanding central to the study of religion.

In addition to attending the summer seminars with lectures from eminent scholars in the field, Smith will work on her own original research project, Promoting and Preventing the Dialogue: Psychological Influences on Discussion in Science and Religion. She will also establish a science and religion student club at CBU. Grant funds are provided to assist with the research and the student organization.

A final conference with presidents from participating institutions will be held in the summer of 2016.

According to the SCIO, the selection committee looked for early-to-mid-career faculty with proven interdisciplinary, leadership and communication skills and a strong research record who were fully supported by their sending institutions.

The project is “a timely and important initiative that will greatly strengthen teaching and research in science and religion, and enhance the intellectual experience of the faculty and their students,” said Allister McGrath, academic director of Bridging the Two Cultures, Andreas Idreos Professor of Science and Religion and director of the Ian Ramsey Centre at the University of Oxford.

More information is available on SCIO’s website: http://www.scio-uk.org/bridging-two-cultures/.

 

“The Hiding Place” run begins Feb. 20

Hiding Place California Baptist University will present “The Hiding Place” Friday, Feb. 20, through Saturday, Feb. 28.

The play tells the story of Corrie ten Boom and her family, who lived under the shadow of World War II Nazism. The ten Boom family lead lives of service, providing a hiding place for people fleeing the Nazis. The story takes the audience from a cozy clock shop in Haarlem, Holland, to the nightmare of the Ravensbruck concentration camp and back to hope again.

Frank Mihelich, director of the production and assistant professor of theatre, remembers reading the book in high school and staying up all night to read it.

“It’s just a compelling story,” he said. “We want to start inclusive conversations about faith, so we want to tell stories that are either dead-on about the gospel or just about humanity.”

Kiana Miskel, a junior theatre major, plays Corrie ten Boom.

“I think the biggest challenge that I have faced with playing this role is the fear of failing to give justice to such an incredible human being and tell her story the way that it needs to be told,” she said. “Being able to hear what these people went through at one of the darkest times in our history and were still able to put their faith and trust in Christ through it all has been so inspiring.”

She said the issues the play presents aren’t difficult to handle, but they are emotionally draining.

“I think it is worth it to really tap into what these people went through at that time,” she said. “It is an important story to be told, and I am proud to be a part of this beautiful production.

Corrie’s faith also touched Mihelich.

“The thing that struck me the most, even when I read the book when I was a kid, was that she had that slogan, and it appears in the play – ‘there is no pit so deep that Jesus is not deeper yet,’” he said. “Light shines the brightest in darkness.”

“I think often about my first-world problems – my latte isn’t hot,” he added.

Performances begin Friday, Feb. 20, at 7:30 p.m. and continue Saturday, Feb. 21, with a 2 p.m. matinee and a 7:30 p.m. show. The play will resume Thursday, Feb. 26, through Saturday, Feb. 28, with performances each evening at 7:30 p.m. and a 2 p.m. Saturday matinee. General admission tickets are $15, with discounts offered for matinees, senior citizens and CBU students, faculty, staff and alumni.

For more information or to purchase tickets, call the Wallace Theatre box office at 951-343-4319.

 

Student athlete wins national writing contest

Jake Zalesky, a senior public relations major, won a national award for a story written as an sports information intern.

Jake Zalesky, a senior public relations major, won a national award for a story written as an sports information intern.

A California Baptist University senior recently won the National Soccer Coaches Association of America Writing Contest in the college student division.

Jake Zalesky, a public relations major and sports information intern, won with a soccer article he wrote for cbulancers.com. Sammi Sheppard, director of sports information, entered him in the contest without his knowledge, so he was even more surprised he won.

“I was shocked. I never thought that something I’d write would win anything, let alone something that’s soccer-related,” he said. Zalesky also is a member of the soccer team.

“That was really exciting, the fact that I wrote an article for my team, and it won an award,” he said. “That was great. That was a huge blessing.”

It also made it a challenge writing the stories.

“As a writer, you have to get rid of all biases,” he said. “You have to stand neutral with things that you’re writing about. It was tough at first, but now it’s a lot easier for me.”

For Zalesky, the biggest reward is seeing his articles online or in print and having the opportunity to write.

“Just seeing it actually there with my name on it is really rewarding,” he said. “It’s giving me a lot of experience. Just being able to write for the school is a huge reward for me.”

Sheppard wanted to give him practical experience after he expressed an interest in sports information.

“I’m very happy for Jake,” Sheppard said. “It’s always encouraging to get some positive feedback, especially when you’re still learning. He’s been a great help this year and has the makings of a great sports information director if he wants to be.”

To read Zalesky’s winning story, click here.

 

Dean of medical school speaks on health and diseases

Dr. G. Richard Olds

Dr. G. Richard Olds

California Baptist University’s College of Allied Health hosted speaker Dr. G. Richard Olds on Feb. 10 for its Distinguished Lecture Series. Olds, the founding dean of University of California, Riverside’s School of Medicine, spoke to an audience of CBU students on the topic “Revenge of the Rainforest.”

Olds is a graduate of Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine. He has worked as the head of Brown University’s International Health Institute and is an expert in tropical rainforest diseases.

The lecture covered infectious diseases hidden within rainforests and the role that health professionals play in combating them.

“I think health professionals need more background in public health,” Olds said. “All health professionals need a better understanding of what is a cost-effective way to care for patients.”

Olds referred to recent outbreaks of Ebola.

“No one appreciated the potential health risk until it got into a densely populated environment where the transition from person to person could proceed faster than the virus could kill off infectious hosts,” he said.

Olds believes the current Ebola epidemic could not be stopped even if there was a cure tomorrow.

“We have to identify the cases, quarantine them and treat them without letting our own health care professionals get sick themselves,” he said. “That is exactly how the Ebola epidemic will be controlled.”

He concluded his talk by saying the priorities for health spending needed to change.

“We put too much money in this country into curing people after they get sick,” Olds said. “We should put far more resources into public health. The patient would actually prefer not to get sick in the first place. I would prefer to stay healthy.”

 

College of Engineering hosts MATHCOUNTS for area schools

The top ranking students at Mathcounts are honored at an awards ceremony at the conclusion of the event.

The top ranking students at Mathcounts are honored at an awards ceremony at the conclusion of the event.

MATHCOUNTS, a competitive mathematics program, attracted more than 150 middle school students to the California Baptist University campus Feb. 7.

MATHCOUNTS is an organization dedicated to promoting engineering and mathematics at the middle school level. The students came from 26 middle schools in the Riverside/San Bernardino region.

The Gordon and Jill Bourns College of Engineering has hosted the competition since 2009. About 25 engineering students served as judges during this year’s event.

The top ranked individuals were Alair Zhao of Oxford Preparatory Academy in Chino, Richard Hu of Beattie Middle School in Highland and Samuel Xu of Frank Augustus Miller Middle School in Riverside.

In the team competition, the top four teams advanced to the state competition: Riverside’s Amelia Earhart Middle School, Beattie Middle School, Frank Augustus Miller Middle School, and the No. 1 team, Riverside STEM Academy.

“We appreciate CBU allowing us to be here. It is very generous of them to provide this,” said Rosalee Hrubic, coach of the Riverside STEM Academy team.

CBU’s College of Engineering awards $10,000 scholarships ($2,500 per year) to the top performers if they enroll in the CBU engineering program as a full-time student in the future.

The competition consisted of four rounds: the sprint round has 30 problems that students have 40 minutes to complete; the target round featured eight questions, distributed a pair at a time and students have six minutes to compete each pair; the team round included 10 problems that team members worked together to solve; and the countdown round was a fast-paced, oral competition for individuals with the highest scores from the sprint and target rounds.

“I feel so proud. This is my first year in MATHCOUNTS, and I am going to state. I hope that I can get to nationals,” said Major Yang of Riverside STEM Academy, a top 16 finalist.

In addition to judging, the CBU volunteers also performed a robotics showcase in which participants were able to interact with a human-like robot and a 3-D printer display.

The state competition will be held at the University of California, Irvine on March 14.

 

Lancer 5000 run will benefit CBU cross country/track

The 5th annual Lancer 5000 will raise funds for CBU's cross country and track program.

The 5th annual Lancer 5000 will raise funds for CBU’s cross country and track program.

California Baptist University will host the 5th annual Lancer 5000 sponsored by Lexus of Riverside on Feb. 14.

The 5K run/walk will start on Palm Drive, the original entrance of California Baptist University and, after two loops through the campus, finish down Palm Drive. Participants will finish the last quarter mile running along the front lawn and Fortuna Fountain with cheering spectators and music as they cross the finish line. The event helps raise funds for the CBU cross country and track program. The event will also include great food, vendors, such as Lexus of Riverside, Chick-fil-A Hidden Valley, United States Karate Organization and UFC Gym Corona, and a post-race raffle for all of the race participants.

Children may also join the fun in the 1K Kiddie Run. All those in the Kiddie Run will receive a medal. The top three men and women in each age group also will receive a medal, and the top three men and women overall will receive additional prizes. Past runs have attracted 200 to 300 participants.

To register, go to www.active.com/riverside-ca/running/races/lancer-5000-sponsored-by-lexus-of-riverside-2015

 

CBU Career Center prepares students for the job interview

Career CenterThe California Baptist University Career Center offers students the opportunity to prepare for the job search by offering mock interviews conducted by experienced professionals.

“It is important. You come to school for four years, and an interview is usually 45 minutes to an hour,” said Mike Bishop, senior director at the Career Center. He said the goal of the Career Center is to focus on making those 45 to 60 minutes really count.

“You’re never going to stop interviewing, so the fact that we have the resource to have as many as we want is totally invaluable,” said Taylor Engbrecht, a senior marketing student.

As senior marketing student Trent Ward put it, “The most beneficial part of the process was being able to experience the real-life nerves and pressures of a live interview.”

Participants are expected to dress professionally and bring a copy of their resume to the interview. The participant informs the interviewer of the type of job they are preparing for, then the interviewer acts as if he or she is interviewing the participant for that job.

“I heard it was intense, so I prepared,” Engbrecht said.

The interview lasts about 25 minutes followed by another 25 minutes of critique. The interviewer gives tips on how to improve the participant’s performance. Assistance in building a resume is also available.

“Overall the feedback was an incredible tool, and it was a great eye-opener for what interviewing will be like in the professional world,” Engbrecht said.

“It is definitely an invaluable experience for anyone bold enough to take on the challenge,” Ward said.

“This is an opportunity to come talk to those with life experience and who want to help students with practical experience,” Bishop said.

The Career Center conducted about 160 mock interviews, mostly with seniors, during the fall semester. Bishop estimated that the Career Center will complete about 315 interviews over the course of the academic year. An interview can be scheduled by contacting the Career Center.

“After every interview our students assess the process, and we have not heard any negative feedback yet,” Bishop said. “The students are voicing that this is helpful, and we will continue to get their feedback so that we can continue to raise the bar.”

 

CBU students fly aircraft from Texas to California

Two newly acquired twin-engine Beechcraft Duchess aircraft are parked at Riverside Municipal Airport. The planes were flown from Texas by two CBU students.

Two newly acquired twin-engine Beechcraft Duchess aircraft are parked at Riverside Municipal Airport. The planes were flown from Texas by two CBU students.

Two California Baptist University students gained a real-life experience last month by piloting two recently purchased aircraft from east Texas to California.

The students, accompanied by two flight instructors from the department of aviation science, flew the twin-engine 1979 Beechcraft Duchesses from Gilmer, Texas, to the Riverside Municipal Airport. The trip took more than 11 hours over a period of two days.

The students, junior Jennifer Endeman and sophomore Howard Dang, both aviation flight majors, did the preflight check, the flight plan and the flying. The instructors, Shannon Cardin and Jared Tapsfield, ensured the students did those things correctly. Cardin said he rarely touched the controls unless his student needed to get water.

The group stopped at several airports along the way, including an overnight stop in El Paso, Texas.

“This trip not only gave me an opportunity to build more flight hours but also helped me gain more confidence as a private pilot,” Dang said. “I got to land and takeoff at many different types of airports, both towered and non-towered airports. This also gave me a chance to see how each airport operates different than the others.”

Both the flight instructors said it was great experience for the students

“I think the most that both of the students gained was to be ready for anything,” Tapsfield said. “If something were to go wrong, even though nothing did, they needed to know where the closest airport was and how to get there as quickly as possible. It’s something students don’t always think about when flying around Southern California, because there are airports everywhere. In the middle of Texas and New Mexico, things are very different. Planning is key and a backup plan is always needed as well.”

Dang also said the trip gave him a good look at the industry.

“This long trip gave me a better exposure to see what today’s aviation industry is really like,” he said. “The majority of airline flights today would take long hours to get from one destination to the next, thus this trip gave me a feel for what it is like to be in the airline industry.”

The department of aviation science now has 10 aircraft: five Cessna 172s, two Cessna 150s and three Beechcraft Duchesses.

“The twin-engine aircraft always bring a new element into a program. They’re larger aircraft, they’re more complex aircraft, said Dr. Daniel Prather, chair of the department of aviation science. “It always takes a program up to a next level, away from just Cessnas and single-engine Cessnas. But not only that, it allows us to handle a significant number of students working on their multi-engine rating.”

 

Family Updates

Dr. Ronald L. Ellis

Dr. Ronald L. Ellis

Dr. Ronald L. Ellis, CBU president, was keynote speaker Feb. 12 at the monthly Good Morning Riverside program sponsored by the Greater Riverside Chambers of Commerce. More than 200 representatives from area businesses heard Ellis present an update on CBU’s programs and economic impact on the Greater Riverside region.

 

 

 

 

 

 

MBBThe final home game for CBU men’s basketball will be televised on Feb. 28 by Fox Sports West/Prime Ticket. The Lancers will play Notre Dame de Namur at 7 p.m.

 

 

 

 

Dr. Andrew Herrity

Dr. Andrew Herrity

Dr. Andrew Herrity, professor of entrepreneurship and business, made a presentation titled Marketing the Forum to the Riverside Technology CEOs Forum on Feb. 3.

 

 

 

 

 

Dr. Robert F. Kirk

Dr. Robert F. Kirk

Dr. Robert F. Kirk, adjunct professor of aviation science, is author of the book Choices: Responsible Decisions for a Godly Life, which was recently published by Author House. The book is Kirk’s third.

 

 

 

 

 

Dr. Daniel Prather

Dr. Daniel Prather

Dr. Daniel Prather, professor of aviation science, taught a one-day course titled Developing Strategic Mission, Vision, and Goals in Business Aviation at the National Business Aviation Association Scheduler’s and Dispatcher’s Conference, which met at the San Jose Convention Center Feb. 2-6.

 

 

 

 

Kelli Welzel, director of new student programs, reports that one of CBU’s new students chose to begin a relationship with Christ last week. The student began asking questions during New Student Orientation and made the decision to follow Christ during a one-on-one with her FOCUS leader after class. “We are encouraged to know there are many similar stories happening all around campus,” she said. “This is just a reminder of why we are so blessed to work here, and the impact each staff member, faculty member and student has for Christ!”

 

Dr. Monica O'Rourke

Dr. Monica O’Rourke

Dr. Monica O’Rourke, associate professor of kinesiology for Online and Professional Studies, partnered with Team Faith Racing Ministry and Fellowship of Christian Athletes Motocross Division at the National Arenacross Racing Series in Nashville, Tenn. on Jan. 31. The ministry team provided racing chaplaincy services to professional motocross athletes, including rider devotionals and prayer.

 

 

 

 

Waylon Baumgardner

Waylon Baumgardner

Waylon Baumgardner, CBU website manager, has completed requirements for the master of science in information technology degree from Southern New Hampshire University.

 

 

 

 

Dr. Bonjun Koo

Dr. Bonjun Koo

Dr. Bonjun Koo, professor of environmental science, has been named editor and a member of the editorial board for the journal International Chemistry Review, effective December 2014. His responsibilities will include selecting reviewers, reviewing manuscripts and occasionally giving advice on manuscripts in his field.

 

 

 

Denise Payne

Denise Payne

Denise Payne, senior credential analyst, attended a two-day training session Feb. 5 and 6 to become a member of the Board of Institutional Review (BIR). Hosted by the Commission on Teacher Credentialing, the training provides a comprehensive overview of California’s accreditation system and prepares individuals to assist in all system components. BIR members are involved in initial institutional approval, initial program approval, program assessment and accreditation site visits. Service in the BIR includes document reading and serving on accreditation site visit teams. Payne received a certificate for providing dedicated service toward high quality education for California students.

 

 

From left: Chris LaPoint ('12); Alexandra Taylor ('13); Dr. Hyun-Woo Park, Dr. Wayne Fletcher and Dr. Nathanael Heyman

From left: Chris LaPoint (’12); Alexandra Taylor (’13); Dr. Hyun-Woo Park, Dr. Wayne Fletcher and Dr. Nathanael Heyman

Dr. Wayne Fletcher, assistant professor of health science; Dr. Nathanael Heyman, assistant professor of biology; and Dr. Hyun-Woo Park, professor of biology, attended the annual Loma Linda University Pre-Professional Advisors Workshop on Jan. 13. They had lunch with three CBU alumni at Loma Linda:  Chris LaPoint (’12), a third year student in the doctorate of pharmacy program; Alexandra Taylor (’13), a second year student in the doctorate of pharmacy; and Rebecca Marsile (’08, not pictured), a second year student in the master of public health program.

 

 

 

 

Dr. Charles Sands

Dr. Charles Sands

Dr. Charles Sands, dean of the College of Allied Health, presented Living SMART: Five Essential Skills To Change Your Health Habits Forever as part of the employee wellness program of the San Bernardino County Heart Health Initiative. The presentation was in Victorville, Calif.

 

 

 

Personnel Updates

Microsoft Word - HR chart

February 3, 2015

Lancer Plaza North offers space for university offices, student areas and a popular new dining facility.

In this issue…

Current News

CBU teams prepare during Intensive Training Weekend

Volunteers "check in" during the airport simulation as Intensive Training Weekend begins.

Volunteers “check in” during the airport simulation as Intensive Training Weekend begins.

Suitcases, sleeping bags, passports and their owners covered the floor and tables in the Chick-fil-A and Wanda’s dining area on Jan. 30.

“It looks like this Chick-fil-A is at an airport,” a student passing by said.

Outside, recorded sounds of airplanes taking off filled the Great Commission Plaza. Adjacent to the Kugel, a make-shift terminal greeted about 400 students and team leaders to Intensive Training Weekend.

The three-day training is geared to prepare volunteers for their summer’s service projects, whether overseas or in the U.S. This year 42 teams will be serving in 18 countries.

The weekend is a tradition for the International and U.S. Service Project teams, and each year the Office of Mobilization (MOB) works to better equip and better prepare their volunteers, including some students who have never left the country or even flown before.

Friday began with the elaborate arrival simulation, where sights and sounds of the airport terminal, customs, health screening and security were created by the MOB staff and other volunteers.

After the simulation, the teams went to the opening sessions of prayer, worship and time with their teams. That evening, they set up beds for the weekend– sleeping bags on the floors of classrooms and lecture halls.

Saturday included training sessions and team bonding exercises. A disaster simulation ended the evening, where the teams used the disaster response training they had received earlier that day.

Jamie Jillson, sophomore psychology major, said she was thankful for that training.

“It makes you more aware,” Jillson said.

“All this training has prepared us for the right and wrong (ways to act),” said Valerie Spezzaferri, sophomore criminal justice major.

Sunday brought even more training, bonding time and team photos. Participants wore gray shirts with the theme for this year, “Resolve.”

Kristen White, director of the Office of Mobilization, said Intensive Training Weekend is only part of the training volunteers receive during the year. From the time they learn their assignments in December, students and leaders participate in a variety of workshops and exercises during the spring semester.

“CBU provides extensive ministry and cross-cultural training for students serving in the U.S. and overseas,” she said. “We are not just a ‘sending’ program; we are a discipleship program with a goal of investing in lives to develop followers of Christ.”

 

Riverside beautification program honors CBU Lancer Plaza

Lancer Plaza North offers space for university offices, student areas and a popular new dining facility.

Lancer Plaza North offers space for university offices, student areas and a popular new dining facility.

Lancer Plaza North was honored with a beautification award Jan. 22 from the Keep Riverside Clean and Beautiful (KRCB) program.

CBU received first place in the category of Exterior Reconstruction with Landscaping. Mayor Rusty Bailey and Cindy Roth, CEO of the Greater Riverside Chambers of Commerce, presented the KRCB awards during the annual State of the City address. Mark Howe, CBU vice president for finance and administration, accepted the award on behalf of the university.

Before CBU acquired the 11-acre property in 2006 and subsequently renamed it in honor of the university’s mascot, restaurants and retail stores occupied the shopping center that was known as Adams Plaza. Today, Lancer Plaza features space for university offices, student areas and El Monte Grill, one of the newest and most popular dining campus facilities.

The award is one of nine KRCB beautification awards presented each year, with some including second- and third-place honors.

According to the KRCB website, the awards are presented to “buildings and facilities within the City of Riverside that capture outstanding landscape, cleanliness and curb appeal.”

KRCB is a community program sponsored by the City of Riverside and the Greater Riverside Chambers of Commerce. Its mission is “to instill a sense of community pride by creating partnerships that work toward the beautification of the city.”

In 2014, CBU’s Recreation Center received the Mayor’s Award from KRCB.

 

Family Updates

Dr. Ronald L. Ellis

Dr. Ronald L. Ellis

Dr. Ronald L. Ellis, president, served on a panel titled The Upside of Intercollegiate Athletics for Private Colleges and Universities at the Presidents Institute of the Council of Independent Colleges held in San Diego Jan. 4-7, 2015. The panel discussed how thoughtfully managed intercollegiate athletic programs can enhance enrollment, strengthen institutional image and support other educational purposes. Panelists compared NCAA Division II and Division III with NAIA rules and regulations pertaining to scholarships and discussed how to maximize recruiting efforts in each division. They emphasized the importance of building successful athletic programs and establishing measurable goals and outcomes as well as the importance of providing the institutional support necessary to build and sustain an athletic program that enhances the academic experience.

 

Dr. Elizabeth Morris

Dr. Elizabeth Morris

Dr. Riste Simnjanovski

Dr. Riste Simnjanovski

Dr. Elizabeth Morris, associate professor of education for Online and Professional Studies, and Dr. Riste Simnjanovski, assistant dean for Online and Professional Studies, presented A Pilot Study: The Relationship Between Non-Cognitive Factors and Student Retention for Distance Education at The Clute Institute’s International Education Conference in Maui, Hawaii on Jan. 6, 2015. The paper earned Clute’s “Best Paper Award” for the session, the third such award for Simnjanovski and Morris at The Clute Institute’s International Education Conference.

 

 

Dr. Steve Strombeck

Dr. Steve Strombeck

Dr. Steve Strombeck, interim dean of the School of Business, is co-author of an article titled Pricing management between partnering rivals: a coopetitive diffusion analysis, which was published in the December 2014 issue of the International Journal of Systems Science: Operations & Logistics.

 

 

 

 

Dr. Matthew Y. Emerson

Dr. Matthew Y. Emerson

Dr. Matthew Y. Emerson, assistant professor of Christian studies, presented a paper titled He Descended to the Dead: The Burial of Christ and the Eschatological Character of the Atonement at the Los Angeles Theology Conference at Biola University Jan. 15-16. Emerson was one of nine breakout speakers.

 

 

 

 

Dr. Jong-Wha Bai

Dr. Jong-Wha Bai

Dr. Jong-Wha Bai, associate professor of civil engineering, co-authored an article titled Case Study: Scenario-Based Seismic Loss Estimation for Concrete Structures in Mid-America, which was published in the November issue of the journal, Earthquake Spectra.

 

 

 

Dr. Laura Veltman

Dr. Laura Veltman

Dr. Laura J. Veltman, associate professor of English, was invited to write a book review on Dawn Coleman’s Preaching and the Rise of the American Novel, which was published in the September issue of Nineteenth-Century Literature.

 

 

 

 

Shawn Wilhite

Shawn Wilhite

Shawn Wilhite, adjunct professor of Christian studies for Online and Professional Studies, welcomed a son, Caden Price Joseph Wilhite, on Dec. 31. In addition, Wilhite was author of Editorial: The Center for Ancient Christian Studies and Ancient Christian Studies and a review article of Atonement and the Logic of Resurrection in the Epistle to the Hebrews, both published in the winter 2014 edition of Fides et Humiliates: The Journal of the Center for Ancient Christian Studies; a review of Union with Christ in the New Testament, published in the December 2014 issue of the Journal of the Evangelical Theological Society and an article titled Papias, published in Lexham Bible Dictionary.

 

 

Jan Kodat

Dr. Jan Kodat

Dr. Jan Kodat, professor of kinesiology, married Jaydee Edmisten on Oct. 12, 2014 in a small ceremony officiated by Dr. David Pearson, professor of kinesiology. In addition, she served as the team leader of an external review team who reviewed Loma Linda University’s post-professional physical therapy programs in December, 2014.

 

 

 

 

Dr. Jeffrey Barnes

Dr. Jeffrey Barnes

Dr. Jeffrey Barnes, dean of academic services, conducted a workshop Jan. 21 at the Strategic Management Conference for the Corona Police Department.  The workshop was titled The Wisdom of Walt:  Leadership Lessons from the Happiest Place on Earth.

 

 

 

 

Dr. Bruce Stokes

Dr. Bruce Stokes

Dr. Bruce Stokes, professor of anthropology and behavioral sciences, wrote an article titled Biblical Life Cycle, which was published in the newly released Messianic Jewish Family Bible, a family edition of the Tree of Life Version of the Bible. Stokes is a corporate advisor to the Messianic Jewish Family Bible Society.

 

 

 

 

Dr. Dennis Bideshi

Dr. Dennis Bideshi

Dr. Dennis K. Bideshi, professor of biology and clinical microbiologist, coauthored a paper titled Evolutionary relationships of iridoviruses and divergence of ascoviruses from invertebrate iridoviruses in the superfamily Megavirales, which was published in the January 2015  issue of the journal Molecular Phylogenetics and Evolution. He also was  an academic editor of a collection of work titled Antimicrobial Peptides: Current and Potential Applications in Biomedical Therapies that was published in the journal BioMed Research International in the January 2015 edition.

 

 

 

Dr. Mary Ann Pearson

Dr. Mary Ann Pearson

More than 60 students and public relations professionals gathered in the Staples Room of the W.E. James building on Jan. 24 for the second annual YoPro Conference. The event was co-sponsored by CBU’s Public Relations Student Society of America  chapter and Public Relations Society of America-Inland Empire. Students from CBU and California State University (San Bernardino and Fullerton campuses) gathered to hear professional PR practitioners speak on generational communication, networking, interview skills and establishing a career in lifestyle public relations. Speakers included Dr. Mary Ann Pearson, associate professor of communication arts for Online and Professional Studies, and Robbie Silver of the Riverside Downtown Partnership, who is a CBU alumnus.

 

 

Brooke Marci Fletcher

Brooke Marci Fletcher

Dr. Wayne Fletcher, assistant professor of health science, and his wife welcomed their first grandchild, Brooke Marci Fletcher, who was born in Castle Rock, Colo. on Jan. 12. She weighed 6 lbs. 10 ozs. and measured 20 inches long.

 

 

 

 

 

Mary Marshall won the first place individual trophy at the Grizzly Open Bible Quiz Tournament in Fresno on Jan. 10. Marshall, the daughter of Suzanne Marshall, adjunct professor of nursing, and Dr. Thomas Marshall, professor of civil engineering, is a member of the CBU Youth Bible Quiz team, which earned third place overall in the expert division at the tournament. Members of the team include Hannah and Leah Marshall, Mary’s sisters.Youth Bible Quiz is a program for youth from ages 12-18 that focuses on Bible memorization.

 

Personnel Updates

HR chart

January 15, 2015

Spring2015-001

In this issue…

Current News

First doctoral program at CBU scheduled for fall 2015 launch

CBU_2014_Nursing_0007California Baptist University will have its first doctoral degree beginning in the fall of 2015. The School of Nursing will offer the doctorate of nursing practice (DNP) after it was approved by the Western Association of Schools and Colleges.

“It is very exciting to be launching CBU’s first doctoral program later this year,” said Dr. Jonathan Parker, CBU provost and vice president for academic affairs. “We have been working very diligently to develop a high quality DNP degree program and I’m especially pleased that our accrediting agency has recognized that effort and commented very favorably on the result.”

The school expects 20 students in its first class, said Dr. Lisa Bursch, acting director of the DNP program. Bursch said there is a national movement to have more nurses educated at a doctoral level because of the complexity of health care. For that reason, the school is looking to train nurse leaders to have an impact on health outcomes.

“For as much money as (the nation) spends on health care, our national outcomes are not that great,” Bursch said. “Something’s not translating between what we know to do and what’s being done.”

The nursing doctoral program will be the only one in Riverside County, Bursch said. Students in the clinical doctorate will take original research and put it into practice. Classes will include organization and systems leadership class, nursing theory and translational research, policy and finance. All students will do a project, which involves looking at health outcomes and how to improve them.

Parker said it is fitting that CBU’s first doctoral program is in nursing. “Programs such as the DNP not only help to meet an important need in society by producing highly-trained healthcare professionals,” he explained, “but they also represent the service-related values that California Baptist University seeks to instill in its graduates.”

 

CBUOnline makes gains in U.S.News & World Report ranking 

2014-08-26-Veneman-Yeager Center-0008California Baptist University (CBU) earned the No. 23 spot among online bachelor’s programs in the 2015 Top Online Education Program rankings released Jan. 7 by U.S.News & World Report. This is a jump up from No. 37 in 2014 and puts CBU second among California colleges ranked in the best online bachelor’s programs list.

CBU entered the online education market in the spring of 2010 with programs offered by the university’s Division of Online and Professional Studies. Since 2013, the first year online programs were ranked by U.S.News & World Report, CBU has placed in the top 40 for three consecutive years. CBU now serves more than 3,400 students online throughout the United States, offering 30 online undergraduate majors and concentrations and 16 graduate majors and specializations.

“We are happy to be consistently top ranked since inception, especially considering CBU’s four short years offering online programs,” said Dr. David Poole, vice president for Online and Professional Studies at CBU.  “We are even more delighted given the significant jump in our ranking to be recognized by U.S.News & World Report in 2015.” In addition to the No. 23 spot for best online bachelor’s programs, CBU also was ranked among the best online graduate MBA and best online graduate education programs as evaluated nationwide for factors including faculty credentials and training.

CBU ranked no. 7 for faculty credentials and training in the online bachelor’s degree category, No. 3 for online MBA faculty and No. 1 for online Graduate Education faculty credentials and training.

“The ranking methodology reviews student engagement best practices, graduation and retention rates, student indebtedness, faculty credentials and training, as well as technological infrastructure. These are all key elements, central to our focus as we build and deliver programs that serve the adult student who seeks a quality, reputable degree in an online format, at a reasonable cost. This acknowledgement and ranking continues to support our mission and drive that quality and experience of faculty, innovative, cutting edge technology, and student support and service are at the heart of what we do at CBU,” said Poole.

For more information about the rankings methodology, and full listings, please go to http://www.usnews.com/onlinemeth.

Founded in 1950, CBU is a private comprehensive institution located in Riverside, Calif. and affiliated with the California Southern Baptist Convention. Fall 2014 enrollment at CBU totaled 7,957 students enrolled in 72 bachelor degree programs with 150 major concentrations, and 25 master degree programs with 45 concentrations. CBU is a member of the Council for Christian Colleges and Universities, the Association of Independent California Colleges and Universities, the International Association of Baptist Colleges and Universities, and the Consortium for Global Education.

For more information on the U.S. News Top Online Education Program rankings, please visit http://www.usnews.com/education/online-education.

 

Spring 2015 semester opens with orientation activities

Spring2015-001California Baptist University kicked off the spring 2015 semester, beginning with new students arriving for orientation.

Freshman and transfer students moved into residential facilities Sunday, Jan. 4. The following day they attended a welcome session and a welcome luncheon. Afternoon activities included academic panel and academic sessions. Later, students participated in the traditional Kugel Walk. CBU tradition calls for newly enrolled students to touch the Kugel, a floating granite globe structure that symbolizes the Great Commission, as they begin their educational experience at CBU and again on commencement day.

FOCUS groups – short for “First-Year Orientation & Christian University Success” – also began Jan. 5 to help acclimate students to campus life. Those groups will provide support for students as they begin their first semester at CBU.

On Jan. 6, student activities included a Purpose Session, Resource Fair, bowling and dinner at the Tamale Factory in downtown Riverside.

Spring 2015 classes began Jan. 7.

 

CBU food ranked No. 3 among California universities

El Monte GrillNiche.com has ranked California Baptist University No. 3 among California universities for best campus food and No. 13 in the nationwide listing.

Dining services for CBU is managed by Provider Food Services, which offers a variety of choices through the Alumni Dining Commons, Brisco’s. Chick-fil-A, El Monte Grille and Wanda’s.

Best Campus Food ranks 1,175 colleges across the United States based on meal plan cost and more than 470,000 opinions from 64,000 students. A high ranking indicates the college offers a variety of healthy, quality food options that accommodate various dietary preferences and that the students are happy with the quality of campus food.

 

Canine ready to serve with CBU professor

RugarRugar is the top dog on campus. Never mind that he is the only dog allowed on campus at California Baptist University.

His owner is Dr. Juliann Perdue, professor of nursing, who got him about a year ago when he was 8 weeks old. Perdue loves animals, but she does not bring Rugar to work just for the company. When she acquired him, her intent, with prior approval from the dean of the School of Nursing, was to train him to be a Certified Therapy Dog.

Perdue heard about therapy dogs a couple of years ago when she attended a nursing conference on holistic nursing. The benefits of therapy dogs include helping mental health patients relax, providing a calm atmosphere for the elderly so they will eat better and motivating patients in physical therapy, she said.

“I love animals and I really believe in animal-assisted therapy,” Perdue said. “There’s a lot of evidence-based research out there that shows it helps patients’ outcomes.”

Both of them went through training. Perdue took an online course and is certified in animal-assisted therapy. Rugar went through puppy training and earned his Canine Good Citizenship. Last month he trained and was tested to become a therapy dog. Therapy dogs are certified by Therapy Dogs International (TDI). Tests include not being scared by loud noises, not going after food when it’s on the floor, and sitting and staying while the owner walks away.

Rugar passed. When he is on duty, he wears a vest made by the company that makes the school’s nursing uniforms, although he will also be getting a bandana from TDI.

Now that Rugar is certified, Perdue plans to ask School of Nursing’s hospital affiliates if she can take him into the facilities so nursing students can see how a dog can help patients. Later, she wants to do animal-assisted therapy, which includes a therapeutic plan with objectives to meet.

Rugar comes with Perdue to work several days a week, and he has already provided therapy on campus.

“I’ve also had faculty request him before tests. They’ll say, the class is having a test, will you bring Rugar in? So I’ll go 15 minutes before the test is to start, and we’ll circulate the room and let them all pet him,” she said. “Right now we just are doing it for our nursing students, but we’re willing to go help anybody. When we walk across campus, students are always stopping to say ‘can I pet him?’ ”

 

Family Updates

The School of Education honored Dr. Bonnie Metcalf (in front center) during Homecoming and Family Weekend.

The School of Education honored Dr. Bonnie Metcalf (in front center) during Homecoming and Family Weekend.

The School of Education hosted a lunch to honor its namesake, Dr. Bonnie G. Metcalf, during Homecoming and Family activities. Her son and daughter-in-law were in attendance. Metcalf also was highlighted at an open house reception and reunited with alumni, colleagues and friends.

 

 

 

 

 

From left, back row: Marilyn Moore, associate professor of behavioral sciences; Dr. Douglas Wallace, assistant professor of sociology; front row: inductees Karla Beltran, Gabriella Madril, Beatriz Thomas, Melanie Jean and Julie Leong. Not pictured are Shelby Moore, Joan Butters, Jeremy Black, and Ginger Monge

From left, back row: Marilyn Moore, associate professor of behavioral sciences; Dr. Douglas Wallace, assistant professor of sociology; front row: inductees Karla Beltran, Gabriella Madril, Beatriz Thomas, Melanie Jean and Julie Leong. Not pictured are Shelby Moore, Joan Butters, Jeremy Black, and Ginger Monge

The sociology program inducted their first nine members Nov. 14 into the newly formed Alpha Phi of California chapter of Alpha Kappa Delta, the international sociology honor society. Dr. Carol Minton, professor of sociology, serves as chapter representative.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Kenneth Minesinger

Kenneth Minesinger

Kenneth Minesinger, associate professor of law for Online and Professional Studies, wrote an article titled 2014 Conference of California Bar Associations, which was published in the December 2014 issue of the Riverside County Lawyer Magazine.

 

 

 

 

Dr. Cammy Purper

Dr. Cammy Purper

Dr. Cammy Purper, assistant professor of early childhood studies for Online and Professional Studies, successfully defended her dissertation for a Ph.D. in education from Claremont Graduate University.

 

 

 

 

 

Gary Steward, adjunct professor of history in Online and Professional Studies, has written a book titled Princeton Seminary (1812-1929): Its Leaders’ Lives and Works, published by P & R Publishing. A promo video is available by clicking here.

 

Dr. Charles Sands

Dr. Charles Sands

Dr. Charles Sands, dean of the College of Allied Health, made a presentation titled Global Health Engagement at the 13th Annual Hawaii International Conference on Education, which met in Waikiki Jan. 5-8.

 

 

 

 

Dr. Tim Luther

Dr. Tim Luther

Dr. Tim Luther, professor of political science, is author of the books Jurgen Habermas’s Reconstruction of Modernity: Reconciling Individual Autonomy and Community Solidarity, published by Linus Books (2015), and Theories of Truth: An Introduction, published by Bloomsbury Press (2014).

 

 

 

 

Patricia Palacios

Patricia Palacios

Patricia Palacios, adjunct professor of nursing, was promoted to Clinical Nurse D at Loma Linda University Medical Center.

 

 

 

Dr. Dennis Bideshi

Dr. Dennis Bideshi

Dr. Dennis K. Bideshi, professor of biology and clinical microbiologist, coauthored a paper titled, Heterologous expression, purification and biochemical characterization of endochitinase ChiA47 from Bacillus thuringiensis, which was published in the journal Protein Expression and Purification in December 2014.

 

 

 

 

Dr. Joshua Knabb

Dr. Joshua Knabb

Dr. Joshua Knabb, assistant professor of psychology for Online and Professional Studies, received notification in December that he is board certified in clinical psychology by the American Board of Professional Psychology.

 

 

 

 

From left (standing): Aurore Inyange, Lisa Xiao, Tony Zhang, Dr. Dawn Gilmore; seated: Joyeuse Dufitmukiza and her friend Taylor, a student in Oklahoma.

From left (standing): Aurore Inyange, Lisa Xiao, Tony Zhang, Dr. Dawn Gilmore; seated: Joyeuse Dufitmukiza and her friend Taylor, a student in Oklahoma.

Dr. Dawn Gilmore, assistant professor of music, hosted five international students in her home on Christmas Eve for a chili supper and stocking stuffers.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Dr. Jeff McNair

Dr. Jeff McNair

Dr. Jeff McNair, professor of education, appeared on a Joni and Friends television episode about friendships with persons with disabilities. The show is available for online viewing by clicking here.

 

 

 

 

Dr. Keanon Alderson

Dr. Keanon Alderson

Dr. Keanon Alderson, associate professor of business, taught a new class last semester called Business 101, in which students create microbusinesses. The course teaches students how to recognize an idea, develop an opportunity, take a risk and either buy products to resell or start a service. As a result of the microbusinesses, the class donated more than $2,800 to charity.

 

 

 

CBU students distributed cookies to children in Skid Row.

CBU students distributed cookies to children in Skid Row.

Dr. Margaret Barth, professor of nutrition and food sciences, and students from the program worked with Fred Jordan Missions during the holidays to provide cookies to children in Los Angeles’ Skid Row.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Parker Andrew Dobbins

Parker Andrew Dobbins

Jared Dobbins, assistant director of global mobilization, and Julie Dobbins, assistant director of chapel and Compassion Ministries, welcomed a baby boy three weeks early on Dec. 20th. Parker Andrew Dobbins was born at 3:42 a.m. weighing 7 lbs. 6 ozs. and measuring 19 inches long.

 

 

 

 

 

Isabella Grace Flores

Isabella Grace Flores

Dr. William Flores, associate professor of Spanish, and his wife Ruth Flores, lecturer of English for Online and Professional Studies, welcomed a daughter on Nov. 4. Isabella Grace was born at 1:45 p.m., weighing 7 pounds 4 ounces and measuring 19 inches long.

 

 

 

 

Personnel Updates

HR chart

December 10, 2014

2014-08-26-Veneman-Yeager Center-0008

In this issue…

Current News

CBU listed on President’s Higher Education Honor Roll

2014-08-26-Veneman-Yeager Center-0008California Baptist University has been listed on the 2014 President’s Higher Education Community Honor Roll for exemplary community service. Approximately 700 institutions qualified for the list nationwide.

“The President’s Honor Roll recognizes higher education institutions whose community service efforts achieve meaningful outcomes in their communities,” said Ted Miller, chief of external affairs for the Corporation for National and Community Service. “This distinction is the highest federal recognition colleges and universities can receive for community service, service-learning and civic engagement. This recognition is part of our strategic commitment to engage millions of college students in service and celebrate the critical role of higher education in strengthening communities.”

To qualify, CBU submitted a lengthy application outlining the university’s community service and service learning participation. Students, faculty and staff contributed more than 600,000 service hours in 2013, with a value of more than $16 million to the community.

Community service and service learning impact two of CBU’s Core 4 student outcomes: globally minded and equipped to serve.

The Dr. Bonnie G. Metcalf School of Education hosted a luncheon and an open house reception honoring Dr. Bonnie G. Metcalf during homecoming week. Her son and daughter-in-law were also in attendance.

 

ASCBU Christmas Party attracts more than 2,000 people

A CBU student sleds down a snowy slope during the annual Christmas Party. Photo by Jessica Bills

A CBU student sleds down a snowy slope during the annual Christmas Party. Photo by Jessica Bills

Students, faculty and staff took a break from end-of-the-semester projects Dec. 4 to celebrate California Baptist University’s annual Christmas Party on the Front Lawn.

The event, organized by Associated Students of California Baptist University (ASCBU), kicked off with a speech by CBU President Ronald L. Ellis who read from Luke 2, which tells about the birth of Jesus. Ellis concluded his speech saying, “This is a special time to remember the birth of Christ.” He then led a countdown that ended with the lighting of the Christmas tree on the front lawn.

The event, attended by more than 2,000 people, featured food stands, arcade games, jumpers, carolers and areas with snow for sledding. Attendees roamed from activity to activity sipping on eggnog and hot chocolate, served at the party.

“The party is great. There are a lot of people here and it looks like everybody is having fun,” said Austin Ng, a sophomore civil engineering major. “I love that our school takes the effort to put on these events. ASCBU always does a great job.”

“ASCBU has been planning this event since mid-August. It is one of our biggest events, and it is great when it all comes together,” said Trent Ward, ASCBU president. “It grows every year.”

High school students who were on campus for the 24 at CBU program to learn about the university also attended the party. Raymond Velasquez, a senior at La Sierra High School in Riverside, was one of them.

“The party is great. I didn’t expect it to be so amazing. It’s like Disneyland out here, I love it,” Velasquez said. “CBU seems like more than just a school, it’s a community. This party made me love the school even more, and I am very much looking forward to coming here next year.”

 

CBU musicians present Christmas concert during chapel services

The University Choir and Orchestra perform during Christmas Chapel.

The University Choir and Orchestra perform during Christmas Chapel.

Musicians from the Collinsworth School of Music kicked off the Christmas season at California Baptist University by performing a variety of selections during chapel services Dec. 3.

The Jazz Band, conducted by Dr. Guy Holliday, began the festivities by performing a mix of seasonal songs as students walked into chapel.

“Christmas is a time of great traditions,” Holliday said, as he talked about putting up lights and how excited children become. He then conducted the Concert Band, while Brett Vowell, director of chapel and compassion ministries, read “The Night Before Christmas.”

Afterward, the University Choir lined the court of Van Dyne Gymnasium as they sang “Tiny Little Town of Bethlehem” a cappella before taking their places on risers.

Dr. Judd Bonner, dean of the School of Music, conducted the University Choir and Orchestra in songs such as “The First Noel” and “Joy to the World.”

The choir and orchestra also performed “I Heard the Bells on Christmas Day,” which is their most requested song, Bonner said. It is based on a poem by poet Henry Wadsworth Longfellow. Longfellow had suffered personal tragedy during the Civil War and after spending years wishing for peace, he wrote the poem “Christmas Bells,” proclaiming “God is not dead, nor does he sleep.”

The University Choir and Orchestra has several upcoming performances, including one at 6 p.m. Dec. 6 at Life Church in Riverside and 7 p.m. Dec. 10 at Magnolia Church in Riverside. Tickets for the Dec. 10 performance can be reserved by calling 951.343.4251.

 

CBU volunteers will serve in 18 countries on 42 teams in 2015

After the Team Reveal, team leaders and student volunteers get to know each other.

After the Team Reveal, team leaders and student volunteers got to know each other.

Excitement was in the air Wednesday night, Dec. 3, as several hundred California Baptist University students filed into the auditorium at Sherman Indian High School in Riverside. The occasion? It was Team Reveal, the time when the Office of Mobilization reveals which volunteer teams the students will serve on.

Next year, approximately 400 students, faculty and staff will make up 42 teams for International Service Projects, United States Projects and Summer of Service. The teams will serve in 18 countries.

The theme for 2015 is Resolved, with the theme verse I Peter 4:1-1: Therefore, since Christ suffered in the flesh, equip yourselves also with the same resolve — because the one who suffered in the flesh has finished with sin — in order to live the remaining time in the flesh, no longer for human desires, but for God’s will.

The Scripture calls for Christians to be resolved to do whatever it takes to live their lives in the will of God, Jared Dobbins, assistant director of global mobilization, told the students.

“Start to ask yourself, what does it mean to be resolved to live in light of the gospel for the sake of the unreached,” he said.

Each participant had received a different colored envelope at the beginning of the evening and were dismissed by color groups later. When they reached their designated spot, they opened the envelopes. Inside was a colored carabiner. Then a leader announced where each color was going. For example, those with a red carabiner were going to South Asia. The leaders and students began getting to know each other and preparing for the training which will run through the spring semester.

Earlier, Kristen White, director of global mobilization, told students to do their best whatever team they are on, whether it’s sports or nursing.

“It’s really not about where you go, it’s about who you serve,” she said. “Over the next six months, you’re going to learn more about yourself, more about the world and more about God.”

 

CBU program helps international students feel connected

AmericanFamilyProgram-001Going to college is a big adjustment for anyone. Going to college in a foreign country makes the adjustment even bigger. California Baptist University has a program in place to help international students feel at home and connected.

The American Family Program, operated by the International Center, gives international students a family here in Riverside to serve as a support system far from home, said Marie King, a graduate assistant at the International Center. Students from Rwanda and students enrolled in the Intensive English Program are required to be in the family program, but all international students are welcome to be part of it, King said.

“It can be a hard transition being that far away, especially this time of year, too, when everyone else has plans and you’re not going home till the summer,” King said. “We just kind of seek to make that connection and help them get a lasting connection to people in Riverside.”

She finds families from the staff at CBU and local churches. Each student and family fills out a profile and then are matched. The commitment for families and students is for at least the academic year, with the potential of being longer, King said. Families have the students over for the holidays and often get together throughout the school year for other activities. Both sides are expected to communicate weekly.

Ken Sanford, student teacher supervisor, and his wife, Denise, started as a host family last year for two Chinese students and are continuing this year with those students. Sanford has been to China through participation in International Service Projects for five years in a row, and he has gotten to know international students at CBU. Sanford and his wife have had the students over for meals, gone out for dinner and visited an amusement park. They touch base with each other almost every day.

“Here you are across the seas, thousands of miles away from home,” he said. “It gives them that other person that can feel like family to them, that they can turn to. This is the more personable, family touch.”

Kristina Tchernyshev is a sophomore from Israel majoring in international studies. She came to CBU because of its swim program. Tchernyshev was matched with a family last year and has spent time with them, including dinners at their home.

“They were really supporting. They welcomed me to their house, to their family. Last year was my first Christmas with them and it was so fun,” she said.  “I got a chance to be part of the family, because my family’s not here.”

It’s essential for international students to feel supported while far away from home, King said. The International Center also offers the Intensive English Program, helps run International Chapel and holds events for international students, such as a Disneyland trip and International Celebration Week, in hopes that they will connect with other students.

“I think it just helps form deeper connections and enhances their education experience,” she said of the family program. “I think it’s a really cool way to impact the nations here at home. You don’t have to get on a plane to make a difference. That’s one thing I really love about this program.”

 

 

Family Updates

Dr. Shasha Zheng

Dr. Shasha Zheng

Dr. Shasha Zheng, assistant professor of nutrition, is author of an article titled TAM receptor-dependent regulation of SOCS3 and MAPKs contributes to pro-inflammatory cytokine down regulation following chronic NOD2 stimulation of human macrophages, which was recently published in the Journal of Immunology.

 

 

 

 

 

Dr. Melissa Antonio

Dr. Melissa Antonio

Dr. Melissa Antonio, assistant professor of biology, gave a presentation titled Pedagogical Techniques to Improve Undergraduate STEM Teaching and Student Learning at the monthly Natural and Mathematical Sciences Department Colloquium on Nov. 19. Her report was based on information she learned last June at the West Coast Scientific Teaching Summer Institute in Riverside on how to “flip the classroom” and incorporate active learning tools into otherwise didactic lectures.

 

 

 

Dr. William Flores

Dr. William Flores

Dr. William Flores, associate professor of Spanish, presented a paper titled Ecocritical Approaches to the Teaching of Nobel Laureate Mario Vargas Llosa Oct. 11 at the 2014 Regional American Association of Teachers of Spanish and Portuguese Conference on Hispanic Literature in Moreno Valley. Flores also presented information about the CBU bachelor of arts in Spanish to a large number of students and diverse local student organizations.

 

 

 

 

CBU engineering students and faculty visit the construction site of what will be the tallest building west of the Mississippi Rier.

CBU engineering students and faculty visit the construction site of what will be the tallest building west of the Mississippi Rier.

Dr. Jong-Wha Bai, department chair of civil engineering; Dr. Julian Mills-Beale, assistant professor of civil engineering; and 16 civil engineering students visited the construction site of the Wilshire Grand in downtown Los Angeles, which will become the tallest high-rise building west of the Mississippi.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Dr. Erin Smith

Dr. Erin Smith

Dr. Erin Smith, assistant professor of psychology, presented a paper titled Creation Beliefs: The Default of the Mind or the Product of Culture? as part of a symposium on Children’s Concepts of Gods: Investigating Cognitive and Cultural Variables at the Annual Meeting of the American Academy of Religion on Nov. 23 in San Diego.

 

 

 

 

Dr. Jeff Cate

Dr. Jeff Cate

Dr. Jeff Cate, professor of Christian studies, has been selected to serve a three-year term on the International Greek New Testament Project (www.igntp.org). The IGNTP is comprised of 25 North American and European scholars in textual criticism who oversee work towards comprehensive editions of the manuscript evidence for the books of the Greek New Testament.

 

 

 

 

REVISIONDr. Jeff Barnes, dean of academic services, is author of a book titled A Student’s Guide to Understanding Jesus and the Gospels:  Navigating Your Journey Through Critical Scholarship, published by Aviva Publishing.

 

 

 

Marilyn Moore

Marilyn Moore

Marilyn D. Moore, associate professor of sociology, was honored at a non-profit event in Fontana Nov. 22 called Women Who Hide, an organization designed to highlight issues related to women’s mental health. Moore was given the Courage Award for her contributions to the community to promote the needs of women in the Inland Empire.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Dr. Torria Bond

Dr. Torria Bond

Dr. Torria Bond, instructional designer for Online and Professional Studies, published a guest blog titled Fostering Real Conversations in the Online Classroom for Blackboard in December.

 

 

 

 

Dr. Ricardo J. Cordero-Soto (center) is pictured with CBU students JosephGemignani (left) and Efe Umukoro, who also attended the conference.

Dr. Ricardo J. Cordero-Soto (center) is pictured with CBU students Joseph Gemignani (left) and Efe Umukoro, who also attended the conference.

Dr. Ricardo J. Cordero-Soto, assistant professor of mathematics, was a guest panelist for a session called Field of Success: How to succeed in a math science doctoral program. Alliance PhD graduates tell their stories at the Field of Dreams Conference Nov. 7-9 in Mesa, Ariz. The conference is presented annually by the National Alliance for Doctoral Studies in the Mathematical Sciences, an organization committed to ensuring an equal opportunity for all who wish to pursue a doctoral degree in mathematical sciences.

 

 

 

 

Dr. Meg Barth

Dr. Meg Barth

Dr. Margaret Barth, professor of nutrition and food sciences, is co-author of an article titled Effect of Modified Atmosphere Packaging on the Quality of Sea Buckthorn Berry Fruits during Postharvest Storage, which was published in the Journal of Food Quality. Barth collaborated with colleagues from the Harbin (China) Institute of Technology. She also served as moderator for a session on local food systems, food insecurity and public health at the American Public Health Association Conference in New Orleans Nov. 17th. Barth presented research on native American edible plants, antioxidant activity and opportunities for development of functional foods at the Southern California Institute of Food Technologists Section Nov. 19 at the Rio Hondo Event Center in Downey.

 

Kay Fangerow

Kay Fangerow

Kay Fangerow, adjunct professor in the School of Nursing, was a presenter Nov. 7 at the 2014 Southern California Public Health Association Annual Conference held at The California Endowment in Los Angeles. Her topic was Using Healthography to Define a Healthy Montclair.

 

 

 

Dr. David Poole

Dr. David Poole

Dr. David Poole, vice president for Online and Professional Studies, was a featured speaker at the 2014 County of Riverside Human Resources Conference in September.  His workshop/presentation centered on the topic of leadership types including transformational, transactional and laissez-faire leaders. In addition, Poole recently served on a panel with other senior educational leaders on the impact of online education for Leadership Riverside Class of 2014.

 

 

 

 

CBU officials cut the ribbon at the dedication of the Brea Educational Service Center.

Officials from CBU’s Division of Online and Professional Studies cut the ribbon at the dedication of the Brea Educational Service Center.

CBU’s Division of Online and Professional Studies dedicated its new Brea Educational Service Center with a ribbon-cutting ceremony Nov. 13. More than 100 faculty, staff and members of the community attended the grand opening held in Downtown Brea.

 

 

 

 

 

Kenneth George

Kenneth George

Kenneth George, assistant professor of business administration for Online and Professional Studies, spoke at the Certified Fraud Examiner Conference in Orange County, Calif. on November 13th. His topic was Ethical Financial Management.

 

 

 

 

 

Dr. Kenneth Minesinger

Dr. Kenneth Minesinger

Kenneth Minesinger, associate professor of law for Online and Professional Studies, recently edited an article for the State Bar of California’s Business Law News titled Using LLCs in Fiscal Sponsorship: An Update on “Model L.”

 

 

 

 

 

Code42, a data security firm in Minneapolis, Minn., is currently featuring California Baptist University in a case study on their website. The case study outlines the plan CBU used for to protect online data.

 

CBU academic secretaries purchased a water buffalo, a sheep, a hive of bees and a flock of chicks through Heifer International as part of their Christmas luncheon. In the past the group exchanged Christmas ornaments but decided three years ago to spend their money to help families in need all over the world. Each family who receives an animal through Heifer International agrees to give the animal’s first female offspring to another family in need.

 

Dr. Matthew Y. Emerson

Dr. Matthew Y. Emerson

Dr. Lucas Stamps

Dr. Lucas Stamps

Shawn Wilhite, adjunct professor in Christian studies for Online and Professional Studies, presented a paper titled Revisiting the Historical Present: John 13 and the Prominence of Discourse Features at the Annual Meeting of the Evangelical Theological Society in San Diego Nov. 19-21. In addition, Dr. Matthew Emerson, assistant professor of Christian studies for Online and Professional Studies, and Dr. Lucas Stamps, assistant professor of Christian studies for Online and Professional Studies, presented a paper titled Baptists and the Catholicity of the Church: Toward an Evangelical Baptist Catholicity at the meeting. Also, Emerson moderated the Scripture and Hermeneutics Seminar at the annual meeting of the Institute of Biblical Research Nov. 21 and wrote two articles: Human Flourishing Through Imagining Communion in Revelation 19: Confronting Evil by Incorporating Christ’s Victory, which was published in Scottish Bulletin of Evangelical Theology, and Facing Our Giants? Getting the Moral Sense Right in 1 Samuel 17, which was published in Fides et Humilitas.

 

The School of Nursing Association participated in the annual Festival of Trees Nov. 24-30, which is sponsored by the Riverside County Regional Medical Center Foundation. The festival features more than 50 elaborately decorated trees, each with its own unique theme, and is the only major fundraiser benefiting the pediatric units at the hospital. Through the support of the residents of Riverside County, the Foundation has raised more $8.5 million to better serve the children of Riverside County. CBU’s School of Nursing has participated in the festival since 2006.

 

Dr. Namhee Kim

Dr. Namhee Kim

Dr. Namhee Kim, assistant professor of communication disorders, presented a poster Nov. 21 titled Group Patterns and Individual Variations in Consonant Assimilation and Vowel Effects at the American Speech Language Hearing Association Annual Convention held in Orlando, Fla.

 

 

 

 

Sandra Romo

Sandra Romo

Sandra Romo, assistant professor of journalism, presented a paper titled Major Minor Faith: An exploration of social and relational factors that influence conversion among traditional college students at the National Communication Association meeting in Chicago on Nov. 19-21.

 

 

 

Shawnn Koning

Shawnn Koning

Shawnn Koning, university registrar, was honored as the 2014 Best Task Force Member by CBU’s institutional data task force at their Dec. 3 meeting. Koning was recognized for her continuing dedication and leadership in improving data-related processes. The mission of the task force is to manage information functions to ensure that CBU data are accurate, timely, sufficient and protected.

 

 

 

 

Personnel Updates

Microsoft Word - HR chart

November 20, 2014

Microsoft Word - HR chart

In this issue…

Current News

CBU honors President Ronald L. Ellis for 20 years of leadership

Dr. Ronald L. Ellis speaks to attendees of a 20th anniversary dinner that celebrated his presidency at CBU. The event was one of several during the week of Nov. 3-7.

Dr. Ronald L. Ellis speaks to attendees of a 20th anniversary dinner that celebrated his presidency at CBU. The event was one of several during the week of Nov. 3-7.

California Baptist University honored President Ronald L. Ellis for two decades of service in a series of events this week under the theme “Celebrating 20 Years of Great Commission Leadership.”

Receptions by faculty, staff and students expressed thanks to Ellis for his vision for turning a small Baptist college into a thriving university.

Dr. Dawn Ellen Jacobs, CBU vice provost and professor of English, recalled that Ellis brought a plan to transform the institution when he became the fifth president of California Baptist College on Nov. 1, 1994.

“There were about 40 of us when he came in 1994,” Jacobs said. “We cared about our teaching and enjoyed relationships with our students, but President Ellis brought a sense of purpose and a vision for something more. Under his leadership, we matured as a faculty. We became a university.”

“I was present at the board of trustees’ meeting where he was elected,” said Dr. Mark A. Wyatt, vice president of marketing and communication. “All of us who have observed and have been part of the CBC/CBU family over the past two decades know the amazing impact that Ron Ellis has had on this place.”

Speaking at a reception with CBU staff, Ellis compared building the university to assembling a puzzle.

“Putting the pieces of the puzzle together is how we have built CBU,” he said. “There are the building blocks: getting the right people—getting champions to direct key programs and offices and efforts; getting the right programs to offer in the marketplace. Of course, getting the housing to come online, the food, the classrooms. It’s kind of like a big puzzle. It’s really difficult to do if you don’t know what the picture looks like.”

CBU’s board of trustees honored Ellis at a dinner at which about 120 friends of the university gathered, including present and former trustees, donors and community leaders.

Dr. Mary Crist, professor of education in the Division of Online and Professional Studies, brought remarks as a faculty member who has served throughout the Ellis presidency.

“Dr. Ellis is a man of faith and vision, an inspirational leader, and a man with a good sense of humor,” she said. “He came here because he felt God’s call to lead a Baptist college, especially one that was struggling. God equipped him with a vision needed to be a phenomenal “turn around” present. The results are obvious today.”

Mike Poma, recently elected chair of the board of trustees, commented that it is an exciting time to be part of such a vigorous enterprise.

“I am eager to see what unfolds at CBU in the days and years ahead as the Lord blesses this university through one of the most effective leaders in higher education today,” Poma said.

Walt Crabtree, immediate past chair of the board, announced gifts from the trustees to Ellis and remarked, “I have been looking forward to this evening for quite some time. As you know, it is an occasion that has been two decades in the making.”

Others who brought testimonials during the dinner were: Dr. E. Glen Paden, retired pastor and president emeritus of the California Baptist Foundation; Dr. Anthony Dockery, pastor of St. Stephen Baptist Church in La Puente and a former chair of the CBU board of trustees; and Dr. Ronald O. Loveridge, former mayor of Riverside and professor of political science at the University of California, Riverside.

Dr. E. Bruce Heilman, chancellor of the University of Richmond and a longtime friend and mentor of Ellis, was keynote speaker for the celebration dinner.

Ellis also will be honored by CBU alumni during homecoming festivities Nov. 7-8.

Under Ellis’ leadership, California Baptist College officially became California Baptist University in 1998. New schools and colleges have been established, including the School of Music, School of Nursing, College of Engineering, the College of Allied Health and the College of Architecture, Visual Arts and Design. Today, the university comprises 10 colleges and professional schools, offering 158 undergraduate majors/concentrations and 41 master’s degree programs.

Enrollment has grown from 808 in the fall of 1994 to 7,957 in the fall of 2014, more than a 900 percent increase. About 75 percent of CBC/CBU alumni graduated during the Ellis presidency.

To view the video retrospective of Ellis’ leadership, click here.

 

CBU celebrates Arbor Day by planting trees on campus

Dr. Bonjun Koo, left, and Jonathan Logerstedt work together to plant trees along the perimeter of CBU.

Dr. Bonjun Koo, left, and Jonathan Logerstedt work together to plant trees along the perimeter of CBU.

About 40 students, faculty and other volunteers celebrated Arbor Day by planting 10 trees at California Baptist University Nov. 15. It was CBU’s first Arbor Day observance.

Although Arbor Day traditionally occurs in the spring, CBU celebrated early to become part of Tree Campus USA, said Christopher Carlberg, senior environmental science major and president of the Environmental Science Club. Tree Campus USA is a program by the Arbor Day Foundation that recognizes campuses that effectively manage their trees, promote student involvement and develop connectivity with the community through forestry efforts. Carlberg said there will be another tree planting closer to Arbor Day on April 24. He was pleased with the turnout at the first event.

“It’s good to get out here and get everyone working,” Carlberg said. “Our goal as a club is to engage and learn about the environment. So if people can learn how to plant a tree, that’s a big plus.”

Though there were minor setbacks — mostly due to unplanned encounters of shovels and pipes — the group finished planting the Jacaranda and Chinese pistache trees in less than two hours.

The group was broken into teams of five or six students. Students with more experience were quick to help other groups with the project.

Dr. Bonjun Koo, professor of environmental science and adviser of the club, facilitated the effort. Through encouraging words and constant teaching moments, Koo kept his troops of volunteers going.

“All of us realize the importance of trees, and we are proud to participate in the first Arbor Day event on campus,” Koo said.

Danielle Brubaker, senior English major, become aware of the event through the campus-wide email.

“I got excited because I have never planted a tree before,” Brubaker said. “I wanted to participate in this so I could come back in 20 years and show my kids and friends that I helped plant these trees on campus.”

When the last tree was put into the ground, a prayer was said over the campus.

To Brubaker this event showed that “we have students who not only care about each other but care about God’s earth, who care about making it better and preserving it and showing the city of Riverside that our campus is gorgeous.”

 

CBU packs it up for Operation Christmas Child

CBU students help pack gift boxes during the Operation Christmas Child Packing Party.

CBU students help pack gift boxes during the Operation Christmas Child Packing Party.

Nearly 700 California Baptist University students and staff participated Nov. 13 in the Operation Christmas Child’s Packing Party.

Operation Christmas Child, sponsored by the Samaritan’s Purse ministry organization, sends shoebox-sized gift boxes to children in need. The 600 boxes that were packed during the CBU event will be sent to children in Africa, Asia and South America. The participants chose whether to pack a gift box for a boy or girl, then moved from table to table choosing donated items, which included school supplies, toys and clothing.

“It is great to hear stories of those who have received boxes, and you know you are really making a difference in their lives,” said Jayde Cordes, nursing senior, as she packed her box.

Other students had more personal reasons for participating.

“When I was in India over the summer for ISP, I met a girl who received a box through Operation Christmas Child,” said Rebecca Rex, an early childhood studies sophomore. “She still had the box sitting in her living room. I got to see the impact it can make.”

“This is one of my favorite fall events because it is for such a great cause, and it is rooted in a spirit of giving and being a part of something centered around God’s love,” said Julie Dobbins, Operation Christmas Child Committee head and event organizer. “There are a lot of people who helped with coordinating the event. It was really a campus-wide effort.”

Members of Associated Students of California Baptist University, Office of Spiritual Life, the men’s and women’s soccer teams and the baseball team were among the volunteers.

“This is my first time doing charity and it’s great,” said soccer player Daniel Westholm, a business freshman. “It’s nice to help, especially when you do it with your friends. It can be fun and nice at the same time.”

“It is not just a box. When a child gets a box of gifts, they also have the chance to hear about the gift of salvation and be a part of a discipleship program,” Dobbins said. “It is the first time a lot of them have heard the gospel, so we get to be a small part of spreading God’s word.”

 

CBU take time to remember veterans

On Veterans Day, ASCBU provided the CBU community  an opportunity to write a message to those in the service.

Messages to those who have served or are serving in the military are displayed as part of Veterans Day ceremonies.

Students, staff and faculty at California Baptist University took time on Veterans Day, Nov. 11, to remember those who have served.

The CBU orchestra performed “The Star-Spangled Banner” before Riverside Mayor Rusty Bailey, a military veteran, took the stage.

“I want to recognize all the veterans tonight and thank you for your service, and applaud those families of veterans for their sacrifice,” said Bailey.

Organized by ASCBU, the event featured speeches by Bailey and CBU senior and veteran Jacob Williams, as well as a special remembrance of Marine Lance Cpl. Sean Neal.

Williams, who served in the Army for more than two years, reminded the crowd of the gratitude they owe to service members overseas and at home.

“As a veteran on this campus, I get to spend everyday by the men and women whom soldiers have fought and died for,” Williams said. “It is a reminder to me of the countless thousands who have paid the ultimate price, so I can walk on this campus and get an education.”

It took a team to organize the event, said Trent Ward, ASCBU executive president.

“I orchestrated a committee of those from ROTC, Community Life and the School of Music. It was a campus-wide effort,” he said. “It is important to honor those who deserve to be honored.”

ASCBU also provided T-shirts for Lancer veterans and gave others an opportunity to write a message to those in the service.

The night ended in a special remembrance of Marine Sean Neal who died Oct. 23 as the first casualty in the war against ISIS. Neal, a Riverside resident and La Sierra High School graduate, died in a non-combat-related incident in Baghdad.

“It was emotional. It touches your heart with gratitude for those who lost their lives and are losing their lives,” said Genesis Sandoval, a freshman business administration major. “It helps you understand what Veterans Day is all about.”

 

Homecoming and Family Weekend attracts 7,500 to campus

Little Lancers enjoy a snack during the Block Party at Homecoming and Family Weekend.

Little Lancers enjoy a snack during the Block Party at Homecoming and Family Weekend.

Homecoming at California Baptist University drew an estimated 7,500 alumni and friends to Homecoming and Family Weekend activities Nov. 7-8.

The Anniversary Reunion Tea held Friday afternoon recognized the classes of 1954, 1964 and 1989, who celebrated their 60th, 50th and 25th reunions.

The 2014 Alumni Dinner held that evening showcased the incredible growth of world-wide relations and partnerships under the leadership of Dr. Ronald L. Ellis during his 20 years of service to CBU.

Christian music artist Jonathan Thulin, a Swedish-American recording artist and songwriter, provided the entertainment.

Eva De La Rosa (’02 and ’07) received the Distinguished Service in Christian Ministry Award. De La Rosa has been helping women for years. She founded California’s first Christian Women’s Job Corps. She is executive director of the California Woman’s Missionary Union & Women’s Ministries. In this role, she oversees women’s ministries and missions groups for more than 2,200 churches, providing training and leadership development. She also serves as education director at New Hope Community Church in El Monte, where her husband is pastor.

Josh Moss (’03 and ’07) was honored as recipient of the Young Alumni Achievement Award. Moss started teaching with Alvord Unified School District in 2003. In 2007, he became program manager, overseeing after-school programs and activities for at-risk youth within Alvord USD.He has worked his way up and became principal at a middle school this past summer. He also teaches as an adjunct in CBU’s education credential program.

Sue (nee Rogers) Etheridge (’68) received the Alumna of the Year award. When she left CBU in 1968, she was one semester shy of graduating with a degree in Spanish. She returned to college to get her bachelor’s and then her master’s in art therapy. For the next 24 years, she worked in the federal correctional system as an art therapist, providing psychiatric assessment and treatment of inmates through the analysis of their artwork. Earlier this year, she was honored as an “Unsung Hero of Compassion” by the Dalai Lama Foundation. Today she works in the state prison system.

Dr. James Forkum (’69) was recognized as the recipient of the highest honor given by the CBU Alumni Association: the Lancer Medal for Lifetime Achievement. His career has included positions as professor, head coach, academic and athletic administrator, admissions director and recruiter at numerous colleges around the United States. He was inducted into CBU’s Athletics Hall of Fame in 1987 for men’s basketball. In August 2014, Jim and his wife, Sherry (’73), began a new adventure at Schutz American School in Alexandria, Egypt. Jim will establish and oversee the first official interscholastic athletics league in Alexandria.

Saturday featured the fifth annual Block Party. The program included the artisan walk, live entertainment, gourmet food trucks, interactive booths and children’s activities.

Saturday night’s program included meeting former NFL players, including Kermit Alexander. It also featured the crowning of seniors Joshua Perez as Mr. CBU and Catherine Rice as Ms. CBU. More than 4,000 people cheered for the men’s and women’s intramural teams competing in the Fortuna Bowl. In a rematch from last year’s game, the Bus Drivers women’s team beat SWAT, 18-0, while in the men’s contest, The Webelos beat Fruit of the Boom, 8-0.

 

Chapel speakers share their story of hope

Jay and Katherine Wolf

Jay and Katherine Wolf are on a mission to share their story of hope. They were on California Baptist University’s campus this week to share that story in chapel.

Jay and Katherine met at a college in Alabama, married after they graduated in 2004 and then moved to Southern California. In 2007, they had their son, James. Six months later, without any warning, Katherine had a massive stroke. She was 26.

“There are these moments in our lives where everything changes,” Jay said. “As much as we want to, we can’t ever go back. That day for us was April 21, 2008. That’s the kind of world we live in. Our ability to control it is just really an illusion. We don’t know where we’re going to end up this afternoon.”

Katherine was in a coma for two months and was in hospitals and rehabilitation for about two years. She had to re-learn how to swallow, to speak and to walk. She is deaf in one ear, has double vision and facial paralysis. Since her stroke, she has had 11 surgeries, including one for a brain aneurysm.

A low moment for Katherine came about seven months after her stroke.

“I remember thinking, God made a mistake here. This isn’t what was intended. Surely God messed up, because God would never have allowed this in my life. This could not be God’s plan,” she said. Then the Bible verses she had learned since she was a child came to her. “In that deep dark moment of wondering, the deep truth of the Lord was impressed on me. I almost heard the ridiculousness of that. God doesn’t make mistakes.”

Jay and Katherine have started a full-time ministry called Hope Heals. They want to share their story of hope and joy with people and point them to the kingdom of God, they said.

“Maybe you don’t have it figured out, you don’t have a job yet, or you don’t know what’s next for you. None of us do,” Jay said. “There’s a great hope in that. You don’t have to have it all figured out. God is taking us on a completely different trajectory than we ever thought our lives could be, and yet it’s so much better.”

 

Family Updates

The School of Christian Ministries hosted Dr. Robert Yarbrough, professor of New Testament at Covenant Seminary, for its first annual School of Christian Ministries Lecture Series. Yarbrough is the past president of the Evangelical Theological Society and has authored many books, including 1-3 John in the Baker Exegetical Commentary on the New Testament (Baker, 2008).

 

Dr. Anthony Chute

Dr. Anthony Chute

Dr. Chris Morgan

Dr. Chris Morgan

Dr. Adam Co

Dr. Adam Co

Dr. Scott Key

Dr. Scott Key

Dr. Greg Cochran

Dr. Greg Cochran

Dr. Anthony Chute, associate dean and professor of church history, contributed a chapter titled Life and Ministry of William Rogers for the book, A Noble Company, edited by Terry Wolever (Particular Baptist Press, 2014). Chute also served as moderator of the Baptist studies session for the Annual Meeting of the Evangelical Theological Society in San Diego Nov. 19-21. In addition, several faculty members presented papers, including Dr. Chris Morgan, dean and professor of theology: Baptists and the unity of the church; Dr. Adam Co, associate professor of theology: Understanding the doctrine of union with Christ within the kingship motif of scripture; Dr. Scott Key, professor of philosophy: Toward an epistemology of value: Wisdom and trust in Aristotle’s ethics and the Gospel of Mark; and Dr. Greg Cochran, director of applied theology: The priority of ministry to the persecuted church: A reorientation of the paradigm for biblical justice

 

Dr. Jeff Cate

Dr. Jeff Cate

Dr. Jeff Cate, professor of New Testament, published a book review on Stanley Porter’s How We Got the New Testament: Transmission, Translation in the September 2014 edition of the Journal of the Evangelical Theological Society.

 

 

 

 

Dr. Mitchell Hovey

Dr. Mitchell Hovey

Cammy Purper

Cammy Purper

Dr. Mitch Hovey, director of the M.S. in Education program and professor of education for Online and Professional Studies, and Cammy Purper, assistant professor of early childhood education for Online and Professional Studies, were keynote speakers at the Division of Children and Family Services 4th annual Early Childhood Education Conference held Nov. 7th at the Riverside Convention Center.

 

 

 

The School of Nursing’s Chi Mu honorary society chapter has officially been recognized by Sigma Theta Tau International. The endeavor was a three-year process that culminated in a vote at the STTI Biennial Conference in Indianapolis, Ind., representing more than 490 chapters in 85 countries. Eighty-three CBU students were inducted into the Chi Mu Chapter on Oct. 24. Honorees demonstrate both academic and professional success and must be among the top students in their class. Sarah Divine-Cooter (’14) was named the new charter president.

 

logo-headerCBU faculty and staff won four awards at the Public Relations Society of America, Inland Empire Chapter’s Polaris Awards ceremony Nov. 19. Dr. Mary Ann Pearson, associate professor of public relations for Online and Professional Studies; Dr. Patricia Hernandez, assistant professor of communication studies for OPS, and CBU/Online alumnus Robbie Silver won a Capella Award in the community relations category for the internship program with the Riverside Downtown Partnership. CBU’s Division of Marketing and Communication received three Capella Awards: one in the multi-media communications category for the We Believe in Excellence promotional video (http://vimeo.com/86330682); in the feature story category, Our Biggest Fan (http://issuu.com/cbu_publications/docs/v58_i2_roundtable_magazine_winter14); and in the annual report category, the 2013 Scholarship & Service publication (http://www.calbaptist.edu/explore-cbu/news-events/scholarship-service/).

 

From left: Karin Nelson, assistant professor of accounting, Jonathan Truitt and Julie Browning, associate professor of accounting for Online and Professional Studies

From left: Karin Nelson, assistant professor of accounting, Jonathan Truitt and Julie Browning, associate professor of accounting for Online and Professional Studies

CBU student Jonathan Truitt, a senior accounting major, was honored Nov. 7 by the California Society of Certified Public Accountants for outstanding scholastic achievement during the Inland Empire Chapter’s student leadership and scholarship event at Chaffey College in Chino.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Dr. Bernard Hennig converses with attendees at the College of Allied Health's Distinguished Lecture Series.

Dr. Bernard Hennig converses with attendees at the College of Allied Health’s Distinguished Lecture Series.

The College of Allied Health hosted Dr. Bernard Hennig Nov. 10 as part of the continuing Distinguished Lecture Series. Hennig is director of the University of Kentucky’s Superfund Research Center. He also served as a guest lecturer to two nutrition and food sciences courses and engaged in dialogue related to research with the faculty of the College of Allied Health.

 

 

 

 

 

Leontine Armstrong

Leontine Armstrong

Leontine Armstrong, an adjunct professor of English, presented a paper titled Diana’s Emotions: Transformations in Transition for the Goddess at the Pacific and Ancient Modern Language Association Conference, which met in Riverside Oct. 31-Nov. 2.

 

 

 

 

 

Dr. Bonjun Koo

Dr. Bonjun Koo

Dr. Bonjun Koo, professor of environmental science, served as a judge for the student competition posters session for the wetland soils division at the International Annual Meeting of the American Society of Agronomy, the Crop Science Society of America and the Soil Science Society of America in Long Beach Nov. 2-5.

 

 

 

 

 

Dr. Tim Luther

Dr. Tim Luther

Dr. Tim Luther, professor of political science, presented a paper titled Ghostly demarcations: Derridean specters of justice in Clint Eastwood’s westerns at the Pacific Ancient and Modern Language Association Annual Conference, which met in Riverside Oct. 31-Nov. 2.

 

 

 

 

Heather Hamilton-Stilwell

Heather Hamilton-Stilwell

Heather Hamilton-Stilwell, assistant professor of journalism, presented Don’t miss these stories! Covering those who live on the Margins and Athletes who pray: Sports reporting that goes beyond the court or field at the College Media Association/Associated Collegiate Press Conference in Philadelphia Oct. 29-Nov. 2.

 

 

 

 

Dr. Daniel Prather

Dr. Daniel Prather

Dr. Daniel Prather, professor of aviation science, provided airport operations training at the Redmond (Ore.) Municipal Airport Oct. 29-31. In addition, Prather facilitated the airport’s annual table top emergency exercise, which was based on an active shooter in the airport terminal scenario.

 

 

 

Dr. Jeffrey Barnes

Dr. Jeffrey Barnes

Dr. Jeffrey Barnes, dean of academic services and associate professor of humanities, made a presentation to the Corona Rotary Oct. 31 titled Fear not: Lessons from the Salem witch trials. He also presented a paper titled The enrollment and retention connection at the American Association of Collegiate Registrars and Admissions Officers’ Strategic Enrollment Management Conference in Los Angeles Oct. 28. CBU’s comprehensive retention plan, which Barnes co-wrote with Steven Neilsen, director of student retention, was the focus of the presentation.

 

 

 

Dr. Melissa Croteau

Dr. Melissa Croteau

Michael Eaton

Michael Eaton

Dr. Melissa Croteau, associate professor of film studies and literature, chaired a panel titled Lights and shadows: The challenges of teaching film in the Christian academy at the 2014 Baylor Symposium on Faith and Culture in Waco, Texas Oct. 25. In addition, Michael Eaton, associate professor of film studies and film production, served on a panel titled Integrity: Integrating faith within Hollywood careers.

 

 

 

From left: Shane Paulson, financial aid technician; Andy Musser, financial aid NCAA counselor; Josh Morey, associate director of financial aid, and Joel Robert Brown, financial aid counselor

From left: Shane Paulson, financial aid technician; Andy Musser, financial aid NCAA counselor; Josh Morey, associate director of financial aid, and Joel Robert Brown, financial aid counselor

Male employees in financial aid are participating in “Movember.”  Each November they grow mustaches to raise funds and awareness for men’s health.  The ladies of the office contribute to men’s health by donating funds; in turn, the men shave.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The Palm Desert Century bicycle ride included 464 riders.

The Palm Desert Century bicycle ride included 464 riders.

Dr. Dirk Davis, academic dean for Online and Professional Studies; Dr. Riste Simnjanovski, assistant academic dean for OPS; Dr. Tom Schneider, assistant professor of English for OPS; and Dr. Mary Ann Pearson, associate professor of public relations for OPS, represented CBU at the Palm Desert Century bicycle ride Nov. 14. Pearson set a personal best for distance at 32 miles, while Davis, Simnjanovski and Schneider completed the metric century route (100 km., 62 miles) in less than four hours.

 

 

 

 

Jennifer and Brandon Ellis

Jennifer and Brandon Ellis

Jennifer DeCuir, receptionist for University Advancement married Brandon Ellis on Oct. 25 in Laguna Beach.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

David Bowling, Julie Goodman-Bowling with Elizabeth Grace

David Bowling, Julie Goodman-Bowling with Elizabeth Grace

Julie Goodman-Bowling, assistant professor of anthropology, and her husband David welcomed a daughter, Elizabeth Grace, on Oct. 6. The baby weighed 6 lbs. 10 ozs.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Dr. Matthew Rickard with new son Rocco

Dr. Matthew Rickard with new son Rocco

Dr. Matthew Rickard, associate professor of bioengineering, and his wife Christina welcomed a son Oct. 21. Rocco Sebastian Michael Rickard weighed 6 lbs. 5 ozs. and measured 18 inches. Rocco’s siblings include Anthony, age 6, and Sienna, age 4.

 

 

 

 

 

Personnel Updates

November 4, 2014

Dr. Mark A. Pike

In this issue…

Current News

Leeds professor to speak on C.S. Lewis Nov. 6

Dr. Mark A. Pike

Dr. Mark A. Pike

California Baptist University’s College of Arts and Sciences is hosting Dr. Mark A. Pike for a lecture on Nov. 6. Pike was recently appointed as the head of the School of Education at the University of Leeds in the United Kingdom.

He will be speaking on the topic “C.S. Lewis on Post-Christian Culture and Faith,” at 3:30 p.m. in the Staples Room in the James Building. The event is open to all.

Pike, a dynamic British speaker, is also a professor in educational values and pedagogy. A high school teacher for more than a decade, Pike received his doctorate from Southampton University before rising rapidly through the ranks at Leeds. He writes and speaks widely on literary, moral and religious issues in education, and is the author of Mere Education: C S Lewis as Teacher for our Time; Citizenship and Moral Education: values in action; and Spirituality, Literature and Literacy, as well as more than 40 book chapters and peer-reviewed journal articles.

 

CBU students view “balance and majesty” of partial solar eclipse

CBU students view the partial solar eclipse through special glasses.

CBU students view the partial solar eclipse through special glasses.

California Baptist University students, faculty and staff peered through special glasses or looked through telescopes equipped with solar filters to view the partial solar eclipse Oct. 30.

Dr. Kyle Stewart, assistant professor of physics, with assistance from CBU’s astronomy club, arranged the event outside Mission Hall. Participants were able to see the moon partially blocking the sun.

“Solar eclipses are rare events to be able to witness,” Stewart said. “I think eclipses hold fascination for people because they are an extremely hands-on, visual way to think about the solar system.”

Amanda Snodgrass, a sophomore aviation flight major, had not previously seen a solar eclipse.

“It’s super cool,” she said. “It’s something you don’t see every day.”

Stephanie Lee, a senior biology major and president of the astronomy club, said it was a great event because it gave students an opportunity to view something they would not have known was happening otherwise.

“It’s amazing to see how an eclipse works and to get a glimpse of how the universe was designed,” she said.

Valarie Ramirez, a junior biology major, was grateful to have the opportunity to see the eclipse and the sun spots.

“It’s a once in a lifetime opportunity to be able to use a telescope like that,” she said.

Stewart commented that solar eclipses are rare events that enable viewers to learn about the motions of bodies in the solar system, like the earth, moon and the sun.

“It’s also a great way to think about the ‘big picture,’” he said, “and to give God the glory for the intricate balance and abundant majesty we see in the universe.”

 

CBU-Stanford wrestling event draws record crowd

More than 2,600 people watch as CBU wrestlers fight against Stanford in the "Take It Outside" dual on the Front Lawn.

The CBU-Stanford wrestling event on the front lawn drew record crowds.

Wrestling took center stage on California Baptist University’s front lawn Saturday afternoon, as the Lancers opened up their season against Stanford with the inaugural “Take It Outside” dual. While CBU fought hard before falling to the Cardinal, 27-9, the program put on a record-setting event as the standing-room-only crowd of 2,620—which included mixed martial arts legend and world champion Urijah Faber—helped set an attendance record for an outdoor collegiate wrestling dual.

To read the entire story, click here.

 

 

 

 CBU alum making an impact with Chick-fil-A

Adaobi Gwacham

Adaobi Gwacham

Adaobi Gwacham (’08) missed out on having a Chick-fil-A on campus while attending California Baptist University, but the business graduate is building a career with the popular restaurant chain.

Gwacham started working for Chick-fil-A when she was 18 and has worked her way up the ladder for the past 10 years. She started as a team member at Chick-fil-A in Chino Hills, in 2004 and worked the front counter, drive-thru and kitchen. She moved into leadership after a year and became the restaurant’s general manager after graduating from CBU. In 2010, Gwacham took a job in the corporate office as a grand opening supervisor for about year before taking her current position as a grand opening consultant and relocating to the Atlanta office.

Gwacham started as a nursing major at CBU and then switched her major to business. “CBU gave me the necessary tools to interact and be successful in a corporate environment,” she said.

As a grand opening consultant, she meets with owners and operators about their grand opening, provides them with marketing and operational tools and travels to support them as they get ready to open the restaurant.

Gwacham has higher aspirations. She says even in college her goal was to own her own business. And not just any business, but a Chick-fil-A franchise. One reason was because of the company’s purpose statement: “To Glorify God by being a faithful steward of all that has been entrusted in us and to have a positive impact in all who come in contact with Chick-fil-A.”

“Chick-fil-A is more than the profits,” she said. “It is about caring for the people and having a positive impact. I wanted to be a part of that and wanted to influence whatever community I will call home.”

Gwacham started the application process in 2013 and was selected this year to be the owner/operator for the Pasadena restaurant, which is under construction and scheduled to open in December. The company opens fewer than 100 restaurants a year.

She is also looking forward to moving closer back to family in Chino Hills and Corona.

“I am very blessed for the opportunity to have been selected,” she said.

 

CBU hosts Sphere training for disaster relief

Sphere training

Participants in the Sphere training learn to set up tents for a refugee camp.

Thirty-four participants attended Sphere Project training, hosted by California Baptist University’s School of Nursing Oct. 20-24. It is the second year the training has been offered.

The Sphere Project was begun in 1997 by a group of humanitarian agencies to improve the quality of disaster response. The training program teaches the minimum standards that need to be met in order to deal with humanitarian issues after a disaster.

“What the Sphere standards were set up to do is provide a consistent minimum standard across the world in emergency response situations,” said Francis K. Horton III, a Sphere trainer and area director for Baptist Global Response (BGR). “There was a need among international organizations that normally, regularly respond to emergency situations to standardize things so that, No. 1, we’re all speaking the same language, No. 2, that we’re all providing the same kinds of relief and No. 3, so that the people who are in need are more likely to get what they need.”

Participants who completed the course included health workers and 29 CBU students. Horton and Ben Wolf, another area director for BGR, were the trainers.

Participants worked through the Sphere Project handbook, which covers the minimum standards for four areas: water, sanitation and hygiene; food security and nutrition; shelter and health. Exercises included setting up a refugee camp and creating a plan for how to respond to a certain situation.

Silvia Bolanos, a senior nursing major, took the training last year and again this year. Her dream is to work in the states for nine months a year and go on short-term missions for three.

“A lot of ideas have clicked, [but now] the ideas are more solidified,” she said. “I am able to create plans now so I have a better idea of how to respond to a disaster if it happened.”

The training also exposes students to the global aspect of the Great Commission, said Stacey Toro, assistant professor of nursing and coordinator for the project.

“There are many places that disasters occur and things happen in closed countries where people usually can’t get in, but health workers and emergency providers and disaster relief workers can,” she said. “We put on this training because we want to promote the Great Commission, a biblical world view, and give another aspect to our students who want to do that.”

Jamila Davison, an emergency room doctor from Tampa, Fla., also attended the training.

“I’ve learned how these disasters can open up doors for so much, (both) immediately and then long term,” she said. “It would be great to not only meet people’s physical needs but also their spiritual needs.”

Jessica Rosas and Monica Quintanilla, both third-year nursing majors, participated in the training to prepare for a possible mission trip.

“We learned a lot about how to work with people of different cultures and how to involve them in their own care,” Quintanilla said. “Our goal would be to help them keep their dignity as opposed to just providing for them and them becoming dependent.”

 

Family Updates

Waylon Baumgardner

Waylon Baumgardner

Waylon Baumgardner, website manager, presented research titled Moving to Git-based Version Control with Small Teams at the Higher Ed Web Association Annual Conference, which met in Portland, Ore. Oct. 19-22.

 

 

 

 

 

Ana Gamez

Dr. Ana Gamez

Dr. Ana Gamez, associate professor of psychology, presented research Oct. 25 at the International Association of Chiefs of Police, Psychological Services Section in Orlando, Fla. Her topic was Ethical Standards Associated with the New Fitness-for-Duty Evaluations and Proposed Pre-Employment Psychological Evaluation Guidelines.

 

 

 

 

Dr. Jennifer Newton

Dr. Jennifer Newton

Dr. Jennifer Newton, associate professor of English, presented a paper titled Cleaning the House of the Soul: George Herbert’s Latin Poem ‘Martha: Mary’ in Theological and Literary Context at the Texas Medieval Association conference, held at the University of North Texas Oct. 3-4.

 

 

 

 

Dr. Dennis Bideshi

Dr. Dennis Bideshi

Dr. Dennis K. Bideshi, professor of biology and clinical microbiologist, was elected to serve another 5-year term as a member of the Ascoviridae study group of the International Committee on Taxonomy of Viruses (ICTV). The ICTV subcommittee is tasked with clarifying the nomenclature and phylogenetic relationships among ascoviruses, which are large double stranded DNA viruses with unique structural and biological features.

 

 

 

Dr. Mary Ann Pearson

Dr. Mary Ann Pearson

Dr. Mary Ann Pearson, associate professor of public relations for Online and Professional Studies, presented a paper titled Online Mentoring at the 7th Annual Mentoring Conference, which met at the University of New Mexico, Albuquerque on Oct. 22.

 

 

 

 

Dr. Trevor Gillum

Dr. Trevor Gillum

Dr. Trevor Gillum, associate professor of kinesiology, co-authored an article with Jared Coburn, adjunct professor of kinesiology, and kinesiology graduate student Nicole Williams titled Static stretching vs. dynamic warm-ups: a comparison of their effects on torque and electromyography output of the quadriceps and hamstring muscles. The article was published in the Journal of Sports Medicine and Physical Fitness in October.

 

 

 

Dr. Charles Sands

Dr. Charles Sands

Dr. Charles Sands, dean of the College of Allied Health, conducted staff training in leadership development Oct. 7 for Sandals Church in Riverside. The session was the last of a four-part series conducted during 2014.

 

 

 

 

From left: Dr. Veola Vazquez and author Joanne Bischoff.

From left: Dr. Veola Vazquez and author Joanne Bischoff.

Dr. Veola Vazquez, associate professor of psychology, was awarded first place in the San Diego Christian Writer’s Guild Unpublished Manuscript Contest for her middle-grade novel The Nickel Nuisance. The expected release date for the book is February 2015.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Dr. Jong-Wha Bai

Dr. Jong-Wha Bai

Dr. Jong-Wha Bai, associate professor of civil engineering, attended the American Concrete Institute Fall 2014 Convention, which met in Washington D.C. Oct. 26-30. He participated in committee meetings and made a presentation titled A Probabilistic Model for Predicting Early-Age Deformation of Self-Consolidating Concrete. In addition, he conducted a seminar on seismic vulnerability and loss estimation of concrete structures for civil engineering students at Johns Hopkins University on Oct. 28.

 

 

 

Dr. Jolene Baker

Dr. Jolene Baker

Dr. Nicole MacDonald

Dr. Nicole MacDonald

Dr. Jolene Baker, associate professor of kinesiology, and Dr. Nicole MacDonald, professor of kinesiology, presented a posted titled Knowledge and Readiness of Inter-professional Education in Athletic Training and Advanced Practice Nursing Students at the Association of Schools of Allied Health Professions Conference, which met in Las Vegas Oct. 22-24.

 

 

 

Dr. David Bishop

Dr. David Bishop

Dr. David Bishop, assistant professor of software engineering, successfully defended his dissertation for the doctor of science degree in information systems at Dakota State University.

 

 

 

 

Dr. Jacqueline Gustafson

Dr. Jacqueline Gustafson

Dr. Jacqueline Gustafson, dean of the School of Behavioral Sciences, contributed a chapter to a book recently published by Cascade Books. The chapter, titled The Whole Story: Revisiting the Unspoken Complexities of Adoption, appeared in the book The Spirit of Adoption.

 

 

 

 

 

CBU’s department of languages and literature co-sponsored the 2014 Pacific Ancient and Modern Language Association annual conference, which met Oct. 31-Nov. 2 in Riverside. As part of CBU’s participation, the department presented two sessions on Christianity and literature at this secular conference. In addition, presentations from CBU included: Manya Wren, adjunct professor of English: When There Is No Room in Hell: A Re-examination of Socio-Political Themes in Two of George A. Romero’s “Dead” Films; Arlene Drachslin, adjunct professor of English: A Dracula Translation of Female Characterization: One Voice, Two Heroines in Bram Stoker’s Dracula and the First Silent Film Adaptation, Drakula halála; Tracee Auville-Parks, adjunct professor in English: Poetry, Jazz, and Forgiveness; Dr. James Lu, professor and chair of modern languages and literature: Two Tales of a City: Riverside’s Magnificent Mission Inn and Desolate Chinatown; Dr. Gretchen Bartels, assistant professor of English for Online and Professional Studies: A great sufferer—my doll”: The Tension of Medical Maternity in Wonderful Adventures of Mrs. Seacole in Many Lands; Robert Sapunarich, graduate student: Grace in the Maelstrom: Calvinism in Moby-Dick; Dr. Laura J. Veltman, associate professor of American literature: The Christ-Haunted Classroom: Flannery O’Connor, Faith, and Pedagogy; Tara Anderson, graduate student: From in between the Mountaintops: A Look at Langston Hughes’ “Christ In Alabama”; L. Maggie Fanning, lecturer in English: Shifting Boundaries: Two Literary Explorations of the Edges of 1960s America; Erika Travis, assistant professor of English and behavioral sciences: Saints’ Names & Sacred Moments: The Persistence of Religion in Ender’s Game; David Isaacs, assistant professor of English: “Be Some Other Name”:  Naming and Supernatural Intervention in Gene Lien Yang’s American Born Chinese and Boxers & Saints; Dr. Owen Staley, lecturer in modern languages and literature: Lucianic Satire and the Invention of America; Dr. Thomas Schneider, assistant professor of English for Online and Professional Studies: Chaucer, Mimesis, and the Fantastic in A Midsummer Night’s Dream; Dr. Tim Luther, professor of political science: Ghostly Demarcations: Derridean Specters in Clint Eastwood’s Westerns; Irina Renfro, assistant professor of modern languages and literature: Sumarokov’s Hamlet: The Religious Redemption of the Female Characters in the Context of Russian Cultural Code of the 18th Century; and Leontine Armstrong, adjunct professor of English: Diana’s Emotions: Transformations in Transition for the Goddess.

 

Jacob Lanphere

Dr. Jacob Lanphere

Dr. Jacob Lanphere, assistant professor of environmental science, presented research titled Stability and Transport of Novel Engineered Nanomaterials in Aqueous and Subsurface Environments at the monthly Natural and Mathematical Sciences Colloquium Oct. 22.

 

 

 

 

 

Justin and Kimberly Holcomb

Justin and Kimberly Holcomb

Kimberly Tallo, accounts payable, and Justin Holcomb were married Oct. 24 at the Grove Community Church. Holcomb is recovering from myocarditis, a viral infection that attacks the heart. The couple had originally planned a wedding at the Mission Inn before Holcomb’s hospitalization but have now rescheduled for March 20. They extend their thanks to the CBU family for the prayer support they received during his illness.

 

 

 

 

 

 

About 50 World War II veterans participated in the honor flight.

More than 50 World War II veterans participated in the Eastern Oregon/Portland honor flight.

Steve Morris, adjunct professor of education, recently accompanied his 92-year-old father on the Eastern Oregon/Portland honor flight. Honor Flights is an organization whose mission is to fly all WWII veterans to Washington, D.C. to see the WWII Memorial. More than 50 veterans, averaging 91 years in age, participated in the flight. Upon their return, their service was recognized by military members and passengers at the Portland International Airport (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JvMRsLjl-2c).

 

 

 

 

Jaysie (left) and Jersie Collette pose with the Lancers mascot at the Take It Outside wrestling match Nov. 1.

Jaysie (left) and Jersie Collette pose with the Lancers mascot at the Take It Outside wrestling match Nov. 1.

Jersie, aged 5, and Jaysie, aged 3, attended the CBU-Stanford wrestling match last Saturday with mom Courtney Collette, financial aid administrative assistant. Both girls both now say they want to be wrestlers.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

No Personnel Updates this issue

 

October 24, 2014

Leadership Allied Health Students at the Riverside College and Career Fair

In this issue…

Current News

CGE president inspires students to use skills in foreign nations

Dr. Carolyn Bishop

Dr. Carolyn Bishop

Dr. Carolyn Bishop, president of Consortium for Global Education, was the featured speaker Oct. 13 at California Baptist University’s College of Allied Health Distinguished Lecture Series. Bishop spoke on the topic “Impact of Education and Healthcare Initiatives in Strategic Nations.”

“Your degrees can be significant not just here in America, but internationally as well,” Bishop told students attending the lecture. “What distinguishes us as an organization is we try to make everything we do successful, and we link that integration of international education, service and sharing.”

Bishop was elected president of the Consortium for Global Education in 2002. As president, she leads in supporting 241 international partnerships in more than 80 countries through 42 accredited American colleges and universities, including CBU.

Bishop stressed the importance of building impactful partnerships overseas.

“Out of 27 years of experience, the Consortium for Global Education has learned a lot about having presidents, faculty and students working overseas,”  Bishop said. “We always try to build strategic relationships, we look for strategic locations around the world, and we make them inclusive so that it’s valuable for the nationals. We always have a multiplication effect, and it is sustainable.”

Bishop referenced the crises in the Middle East and spoke about how the sheer numbers of refugees fleeing the violence in their countries have created a “deplorable living environment” in refugee camps.

“We have challenged any small church effort to have a school in their church and get the kids out of these living conditions,” she said.

Bishop gave more examples of strategic partnerships in Haiti, China, North Korea, Cambodia and many other nations.

“It has been a pleasure to be a part of the Consortium for Global Education for 17 years and watch CBU grow,” she said. “What you are doing here is a part of a whole, and this campus is involved not just here or statewide, but worldwide as well.”

CBU students take a stab at learning dinner etiquette

dinner

Mio Evelyn (left), junior prenursing major, and Maxine Martinez (right), senior biology major watch Chelsea Royse demonstrate the different styles of cutting, American and continental. Photo by Jessica Bills

“We’re amateurs,” Beatriz Thomas, senior sociology major, said with a nervous chuckle as she realized she was eating with the wrong fork.

Every spilled grain of rice, momentary awkward silence and passing of bread was an opportunity for California Baptist University students to learn dining and professional etiquette.

The Career Center hosts a biannual Etiquette Dinner focusing on “which fork do I use” kind of dinner protocol while maintaining a countenance of professionalism.

Since last spring, Chelsea Royse, career counselor and internship coordinator, has been hosting the event to teach students proper dining behavior.

“It’s not just about what fork do you use,” Royse said. “It’s also about how to hold an appropriate conversation, how to converse with people, how to have purpose at a dinner and not just take the back seat.”

The etiquette dinners are geared to help students prepare for real life situations of dining with employers or potential ones.

“For a lot of students this is the first time they have been at a table with four forks and knifes,” Royse said. “It’s a safe environment to learn, because you can mess up and it’s fine. They don’t want to have their first experience being confused or embarrassed because they didn’t know to put their napkin on their lap.”

Students learned mingling tactics, how to use their knives and forks the American way and Continental way (it’s how one holds them and uses them), tips for keeping a flow of constant conversations and even how to eat sushi gracefully. Though the students have to pay to attend, they left wishing to return and recreate the fun they had meeting new people and consuming good food.

“Come because it’s fun,” Royse said about future events. “You’ll be surprised by how much you learn.”​

Family Updates

CBU students Hosiana Abewe, Grace De Dieu Irumva, and Christian Shema Mugisha, who are all biochemistry and molecular biology majors, attended the annual National Organization for the Professional Advancement of Black Chemists and Chemical Engineers (NOBCChE) conference in New Orleans Sept. 23-26. Irumva and Abewe presented posters on their summer research at the Center for Aerosol Impacts on Climate and the Environment at UC San Diego.

 

Medina_01 group photoAssembly member Jose Medina (center in photo at left) spoke with CBU students enrolled in the Graduate Nursing Health Policy & Bioethics course Oct. 6.  The students shared current advanced practice nursing policy agendas that could improve patient care by removing practice barriers.

 

 

 

 

 

Students in Arlene Drachslin’s ENG 113 class recently conducted a Composition Concert on the front lawn to fulfill requirements for an observation essay. Musically inclined members of the class performed, while other students observed. Both wrote essays according to their experience in the concert, either as performer or observer. One participant observed: “Socially, this whole event had such a grand significance in showing how worship music not only unites believers, but uplifts spirits and encourages people in their everyday lives.” Drachslin is an adjunct professor of English.

 

UCD Conference crop

Some of the CBU students who attended the conference at the University of California Davis.

Students from the department of natural and mathematical sciences and from the student-governed American Medical Student Association CBU Chapter attended the 12th Annual University of California Davis Pre-Medical & Pre-Health Professions National Conference on Oct. 11-12. The two-day event included a selection of keynote speakers, deans’ panels and 250 workshops covering a variety of health professional topics.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Dr. Chris Morgan

Dr. Chris Morgan

Crossway Books recently published the latest book by Dr. Chris Morgan, dean of the School of Christian Ministries. The book, Heaven, is the sixth volume in the Theology in Community series (which he co-edits with Dr. Robert Peterson), and his 15th book overall.

 

 

 

 

 

Michael Bishop

Michael Bishop

Dr. Andrew Herrity

Dr. Andrew Herrity

Dr. Andrew Herrity, professor of business and entrepreneurship, and Michael Bishop, senior director of career services, won the Best Theme-Related Paper Award at the Christian Business Faculty Association Meeting Oct. 11 in Nashville, Tenn. Herrity presented the paper, which was titled Making a Difference at the Intersection of Faith and Business: Teaching Undergraduates to Align Values and Strengths with Career Opportunities.

 

 

 

Jessica Alzen

Jessica Alzen

Jessica Alzen, adjunct professor of English for Online and Professional Studies, won the American Educational Research Association’s dissertation fellowship for her proposed dissertation titled Investigating the Sensitivity of Teacher Classifications Based on Multiple Measures to Value-Added Model Specification. Alzen plans to use data from the Measures of Effective Teaching project that was funded by the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation.

 

 

 

Dr. Mary Ann Pearson

Dr. Mary Ann Pearson

Dr. Mary Ann Pearson, associate professor of public relations for Online and Professional Studies, presented a session for the County of Riverside’s fiscal and administrative managers meeting Oct. 14 in Riverside. Her topic was social media and personal branding.

 

 

 

 

Dave Williams

Dave Williams

David Williams, adjunct professor of visual arts, held a closing reception Oct. 18 for his art show Works by Williams: A 30 Year Retrospective. Williams, who has taught ceramics at CBU about 30 years, held a monthlong show at the CBU Gallery in downtown Riverside.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Dr. Daniel Prather

Dr. Daniel Prather

Dr. Daniel Prather, chair of the department of aviation science, presented Aviation Workforce – Current and Future Availability of Airline Pilots: An Overview of the GAO Report and How Collegiate Aviation Should Respond at the Fall Education Conference of the University Aviation Association, held Oct. 8-11 in Daytona Beach, Fla.  Prather completed his three-year term of the strategic planning committee and was elected to serve a three-year term as chair of the graduate education committee.

 

 

 

 

Dr. Candace Vickers

Dr. Candace Vickers

Dr. Candace Vickers, associate professor of communication disorders, was recently appointed to a national committee for the American Speech-Language-Hearing Association. Vickers will serve on the committee on the international classification of functioning, disability and health. The committee is charged with applying the international classification of functioning, disability and health framework to goal setting and outcomes measurement. It also helps members focus on function by advising, providing input, reviewing, and promoting appropriate products and activities.

 

 

 

From left: Dr. Barth, Dr. Hu, Grace, Michael, Ben, Dr. Zheng, and Professor Daniel McCarthy, director of the Cultural Resources Management Department at San Manuel Band of Mission Indians and session moderator

From left: Dr. Margaret Barth, Dr. Hannah Hu, Grace Crosby, Michael Luong, Benjamin Knisley, Dr. Shasha Zheng and Daniel McCarthy, director of the Cultural Resources Management Department at San Manuel Band of Mission Indians and session moderator

Faculty and students from the department of natural and mathematical sciences and the department of health sciences attended the 29th Annual California Indian Conference at California State University, San Bernardino on Oct. 10. Michael Luong, biochemistry and molecular biology major; Benjamin Knisley, applied statistical analysis major; and Grace Crosby, healthcare administration major, presented a session on Cooking with Native Foods, based on research conducted with Dr. Margaret Barth, director of the nutrition and food sciences program; Dr. Shasha Zheng, assistant professor of health sciences; and Dr. Hannah Hu, assistant professor of chemistry.

 

 

 

 

 

Denise Payne

Denise Payne

Denise Payne, senior credential analyst, has been re-elected as president of Credential Counselors and Analysts of California for the 2014-2015 year. As president in 2013-2014, she had oversight of the 36th Annual CCAC Conference in Sacramento Oct. 15-17, with 800 attendees. She also hosted the president’s lunch and presented a workshop with Commission on Teacher Credentialing staff titled Preparing for an Accreditation Visit.

 

 

 

 

Leadership Allied Health Students at the Riverside College and Career Fair

Leadership Allied Health Students at the Riverside College and Career Fair

The Leadership Allied Health program, which includes 20 students within the College of Allied Health, staffed a recruitment table at the annual Riverside College and Career Fair hosted at the Galleria at Tyler. The Leadership Allied Health students spoke to more than 200 prospective students and parents, introducing College of Allied Health programs and answering general questions about CBU.

 

 

 

 

 

Brandon and Stephanie VanBuskirk

Brandon and Stephanie VanBuskirk

Brandon VanBuskirk married Stephanie Lee (’13) on Sept. 28. He is the son of Patty VanBuskirk, department secretary in communication arts, and plans to graduate from CBU in December with a degree in nursing. Stephanie is a nursing alumna.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Annabelle Rose Alzen

Annabelle Rose Alzen

Jessica Alzen, adjunct professor of English for Online and Professional Studies, and her husband, Michael, welcomed a daughter on Sept. 15. Annabelle Rose was born at 8:29 a.m., weighing 6 pounds 3 ounces and measuring 19 inches long.

 

 

 

 

 

Charlotte Rose Fuller

Charlotte Rose Fuller

Nikki Fuller, adjunct professor of English, and her husband, Matt, welcomed a daughter on Sept. 28. Charlotte Rose was born at 1:04 a.m., weighing 7 pounds 8 ounces and measuring 19.5 inches long.

 

 

 

 

Personnel Updates

Microsoft Word - HR chart

October 10, 2014

Microsoft Word - HR chart

In this issue…

Current News

CBU dedicates School of Nursing Annex and Prayer Garden

From left: Dr. Ronald L. Ellis, CBU president; Dr. Geneva Oaks, dean of the School of Nursing; and Walt Crabtree, chair of the CBU board of trustees, cut the dedication ribbon for the new Nurse Annex.

From left: Dr. Ronald L. Ellis, CBU president; Dr. Geneva Oaks, dean of the School of Nursing; and Walt Crabtree, chair of the CBU board of trustees, cut the dedication ribbon for the new School of Nursing Annex.

Nearly 200 nursing students were among those who gathered Sept. 25 for the dedication of the Nursing Annex and the Robert and Phoebe Lambeth Prayer Garden at California Baptist University.

The annex nearly triples the space available for classrooms and laboratories for the nursing school that was established in 2005 and now numbers 597 students.

In remarks at the dedication, CBU President Ronald L. Ellis spoke about the growth of the School of Nursing and acknowledged the generosity of Robert and Phoebe Lambeth for their decades of financial support of CBU. The Lambeth’s attended the ceremony along with their son, Pike, and his family.

The Robert and Phoebe Lambeth Prayer Garden provides students a place for quiet reflection. Inscribed on a fountain in the garden are the words of Matthew 25:35-40, in which Jesus speaks about feeding the hungry and visiting the sick. Ellis noted the scripture fits well with the school because nurses serve those in need.

Dr. Geneva Oaks, dean of the School of Nursing, offered the prayer of dedication at the ceremony.

Phoebe Lambeth, who is also a CBU trustee, reflected on the dedication of the garden.

“It was lovely and touching,” she said. “I was so glad our family was there to see it and to see what it means to us.”

Following the dedication and ribbon cutting, attendees toured the prayer garden and the Nursing Annex classrooms, offices and state-of-the-art labs, as well as a simulation room designed to give nursing students realistic clinical scenarios.

 

CBU announces record fall enrollment of 7,957 students

enrollmentEnrollment at California Baptist University for the fall 2014 semester is a record-high 7,957 students—an 11 percent increase above the fall 2013 enrollment figure, President Ronald L. Ellis announced Oct. 3.

“This is a day of celebration,” Ellis told the university’s Board of Trustees at their fall meeting. “That is a huge increase and we are very grateful for the way God has been blessing CBU.”

This year’s enrollment number represents an increase of 813 students over the fall 2013 total of 7,144. All enrollment segments, including undergraduate, graduate and Online and Professional Studies, are included in this year’s figures.

“This size of increase is extremely rare in institutions the size of CBU,” Ellis said. He noted that 2014 marks the fourth consecutive year of 600-plus enrollment growth compared to the previous year and a 94 percent increase in five years. Fall 2009 enrollment was 4,105.

“We’ve had an amazing five-year run,” Ellis declared.

The current student body is 8.8 times larger than the 808 students enrolled when Ellis began his tenure as president in 1994. During the 64-year history of the institution, enrollment has jumped by triple digits 14 times – all of those since fall 1995.

California Baptist University offers 158 undergraduate majors and concentrations and 41 master’s degree programs. Founded in 1950, CBU is a private comprehensive institution located in Riverside, Calif. and affiliated with the California Southern Baptist Convention. CBU is a member of the Council for Christian Colleges and Universities, the Association of Independent California Colleges and Universities, the International Association of Baptist Colleges and Universities and the Consortium for Global Education.

 

CBU professor speaks on legal issues of drones

Dr. Daniel Skubik, professor of law, ethics and humanities, speaks on drones at the Riverside County Law Library.

Dr. Daniel Skubik, professor of law, ethics and humanities, speaks on the topic of drones at the Riverside County Law Library.

Most people may think of the military or the government when they hear the word drone. Or they may think of the small models that individuals own. They might not think of the legal issues that come with an Unmanned Aircraft System, otherwise known as a drone.

But Dr. Daniel Skubik, a professor of law, ethics and humanities at California Baptist University, does. He spoke Oct. 7 at the Riverside County Law Library in downtown Riverside as part of the Mandatory Continuing Legal Education programs for lawyers. He spoke on “Drones: Legalities, Practicalities, Myths and Facts.” Skubik is an attorney specializing in international law. He also conducted research on drones in the fall of 2012 while he was on sabbatical at Zirve University in Turkey.

Skubik discussed the technical complexities of the devices, since what counts as a drone ranges in size from ounces to tons. Costs range from $100 to tens of millions, and they are being used by governments, as well as corporations and hobbyists.

“Anyone can build a drone. It’s like building a model airplane,” he said. It’s the attachments, such as cameras or weapons that make them different.

Because of the variety of drones, there is a wide range of legal issues involved, from international and foreign affairs legalities to federal, state and local laws and regulations concerning their use, Skubik said. Possible legal issues domestically include trespass, nuisance and invasion of privacy. No commercial use of drones, such as by photographers, is allowed, though many do not know that, he said.

“The law is very rarely able to handle current technological issues. It’s usually behind,” Skubik said after the presentation. “I would like to see the law address these issues.”

 

Nutrition guide aims to give Lancers the fuel they need

Lancers FuelIt started with a question, which led to a product aimed at helping Lancer athletes be all that they can.

Four years ago Chris Bates was interviewing with California Baptist University for the position of head strength and conditioning coach. He remembers being asked what the Chris Bates era would be like.

“I thought that was a really cool question,” Bates said. “It did two things. It empowered me to really do my job, but then it also freed me up to really dream and think big.”

CBU did not have a strength and conditioning program when he was hired, so Bates built the program from the ground up. He did an assessment of what the program had and what was needed, everything from equipment to non-tangibles such as the mission of athletics. He changed the name of the program to Athletic Performance Development to be more encompassing and to include strength conditioning, speed agility and leadership development. Over time, the program received a new facility and equipment. The program also helps student athletes who get injured.

“I’m here primarily for the student athletes, to train our student athletes, to help them to get stronger, to help them perform better,” he said.

The latest component in helping athletes perform better is nutrition. This summer the Lancers Fuel, a nutrition guide, was put together and will be given to all student athletes.

“The most immediate need for Lancers Fuel was education,” Bates said. “Student athletes would constantly ask, ‘Hey, Coach Bates, what should I be eating?’”

That made him think the students needed more information. He researched and looked at what other schools were doing. Then he shared his vision and brainstormed with Dr. Micah Parker, director of athletics. Dr. Margaret Barth, program director of nutrition and food sciences in the CBU College of Allied Health, was brought on board. Kimberly Walters, a nutrition and food sciences senior, began doing research in June, looking at nutrition textbooks and other programs with university athletic nutrition manuals and assembling the information. It was customized for CBU student athletes.

“We wanted it to be very practical and hands-on,” Barth said. The guide includes information on portion sizes, when to eat, energy drinks, supplements, sleep and more. It also gives recommendations for students in specific sports.

“The sky’s the limit right now on how they use it,” Bates said. The athletic performance development staff will reference it. They will also encourage the coaches to use it with the teams.

Both Bates and Barth see the guide as just the beginning to teaching CBU athletes about nutrition.

“That’s just the first phase in the education,” Bates said. “I definitely think it’s a great platform just to continue to build our Lancers Fuel program and ultimately build our athletic performance development program,” Bates said.

 

Family Updates

A group from CBU's Collinsworth School of Music at the Great Wall of China

A group from CBU’s Collinsworth School of Music at the Great Wall of China

A performance group from the Shelby Ferne Collinsworth School of Music took their music to China for about 12 days last summer. Eight students and Dr. Judd Bonner, dean of the Collinsworth School of Music, performed concerts at universities and high schools and led worship at a church service. Bonner also demonstrated conducting. The group was well received, often receiving standing ovations from audiences that averaged about 1,000 in number, Bonner said.

 

 

 

 

Dr. Mary Ann Pearson

Dr. Mary Ann Pearson

Dr. Mary Ann Pearson, associate professor of public relations for Online and Professional Studies, presented a session Sept. 17 on researching, planning, implementing and evaluating a public relations campaign at the 17th Nonprofit Conference at the Grove Church in Riverside. More than 100 attended the meeting, which is presented annually by Community Connect to expand the impact of the nonprofit sector through peer-to-peer learning, networking and collaboration.

 

 

 

Dr. Derek Updegraff

Dr. Derek Updegraff

Dr. Derek Updegraff, assistant professor of English, published two poems in the Saint Katherine Review, volume 4, number 3. The poems are titled My unbelief is a weeping in a field and A bird of one kind or another.

 

 

 

 

Dr. Julianna Browning

Dr. Julianna Browning

Dr. Julianna Browning, associate professor of accounting for Online & Professional Studies, recently edited an article titled Education for Sustainability in the Accounting Curriculum at a New Zealand University for the Sustainability Accounting, Management and Policy Journal.

 

 

 

 

Dr. Ana Gamez

Dr. Ana Gamez

Dr. Ana Gamez, associate professor of forensic psychology, was awarded a Quality Service Award on Sept. 11 from the Los Angeles County Sheriff’s Department in recognition of her dedication to assisting police officers during emergency situations.

 

 

 

 

Dr. Dennis Bideshi

Dr. Dennis Bideshi

Dr. Dennis K. Bideshi, professor of biology and clinical microbiologist, co-authored six published peer-reviewed scientific articles over the past several months. He also was a co-author of work presented at the annual Society for Invertebrate Pathology meeting in Mainz, Germany. In addition, he has accepted current positions on the editorial boards of two recently established journals: Dataset Papers in Science and Advances in Biology.

 

 

 

Dawn Gilmore

From left: Daniel Herrera, Maria Herrara, Santiago Reyna, Dr. Dawn Gilmore and CBU student Daniel Herrera

Dr. Dawn Gilmore, assistant professor of music, welcomed guest musicians to her Music in Global Cultures class recently. Student Daniel Herrera and his family are active in the mariachi group Estrellas de Oro y Plata. They discussed mariachi music, its history in Central America, and they performed for the class.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Anna Grigorian-Routon

Anna Grigorian-Routon

Dr. Joseph Pelletier

Dr. Joseph Pelletier

Dr. Joshua Knabb

Dr. Joshua Knabb

Dr. Joshua Knabb, assistant professor of psychology for Online and Professional Studies, wrote an article titled A Preliminary Investigation of the Relationship Between Religion and Marital Adjustment Among Christian Adults From a Conservative Denomination, which was published in a recent issue of Journal of Psychology and Christianity. He also co-authored an article with Dr. Joseph Pelletier, assistant professor of psychology, and Anna Grigorian-Routon, lecturer in psychology for Online and Professional Studies, titled Towards a Psychological Understanding of Servanthood: An Empirical Investigation of the Relationship Between Orthodox Beliefs, Experiential Avoidance, and Self-Sacrificial Behaviors Among Christians at a Religiously-Affiliated University, published in the Journal of Psychology & Theology.

 

Dr. Thomas Ferko

Dr. Thomas Ferko

Dr. Bruce Prins

Dr. Bruce Prins

Dr. Thomas Ferko, professor of chemistry, and Dr. Bruce Prins, professor of biology, spoke Sept. 24 at the monthly natural and mathematical sciences department colloquium on their experiences leading ISP teams last summer. Prins led the South Asia: Healthcare team and Ferko led the East Asia: Applied Science team.

 

 

 

 

President Ronald L. Ellis presents Robert Shields the Employee of the Month Award for October.

President Ronald L. Ellis presents Robert Shields the Employee of the Month Award for October.

Robert Shields, online learning systems administrator for Online and Professional Studies, was honored Sept. 29 as Employee of the Month for October. His nomination form included the following statements: “Robert’s commitment and dedication to providing the highest level of service is exemplified through his actions. Robert has worked weekends and evenings and has traveled to remote sites in order to assist faculty. His soft-spoken and gentle disposition combined with a keen technical ability are key ingredients that help calm customers and build trust as he works with them to solve problems.”

 

 

 

Dr. Art Cleveland

Dr. Art Cleveland

Dr. Art Cleveland, vice president for university advancement, chaired a session on water pollution management and presented a paper at the International Congress on the Environment Sept. 21-23 in Qingdao, China. Cleveland is also professor of environmental science at CBU. His presentation was titled: Utilization of a Patented Microbial Continuous-Flow Augmentation System to Reduce Biological Oxygen Demand and Pollutants for Small Business and Municipalities.

 

 

 

Dr. Candace Vickers

Dr. Candace Vickers

Dr. Candace Vickers, associate professor of speech and language pathology, served as guest editor for the June edition of Perspectives on Neurophysiology and Neurogenic Speech and Language Disorders, published online Oct. 3. She also wrote an article in the journal titled Communication Recovery Groups for Persons with Aphasia: A Replicable Program for Medical and University Settings.

 

 

 

 

baby Kate

Kate Madeleine Lanphere

Dr. Jacob Lanphere, assistant professor of environmental science, and his wife Jill welcomed a daughter on Sept. 23. Kate Madeleine was born at 7:57 p.m., weighing 8 lbs. 12 ozs., and measuring 20.5 inches long.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

2nd placeIsabella Garcia, daughter of Katrina Garcia, assistant director of academic advising in Online and Professional Studies, recently traveled with her softball team, the OC Batbusters, to play in the 10U class Amateur Softball Association National Tournament. The team placed 2nd out of 44 teams.

 

 

 

 

Personnel Updates

Microsoft Word - HR chart

September 19, 2014

DCIM112GOPRO Processed with VSCOcam with k2 preset

In this issue…

Current News

9-11 terrorist attack remembrance nets unique photo

DCIM112GOPRO Processed with VSCOcam with k2 presetA California Baptist University event honoring victims of the 9/11 terrorist attack resulted in a stunning image that inspired Spencer Findley, a CBU film major.

During the day, students, faculty and staff took one of 2,977 flags, one for each victim of the terrorist attack, and placed the flag in the lawn of the Stamps Courtyard. Names of the victims were listed on nearby posters, and each name was on a piece of paper for participants to take with them. The event was sponsored by the Associated Students of California Baptist University.

At the end of the day, all the flags formed a large cross, which was lit at its edges to stand out as the sun set. Findlay used a drone to photograph the scene.

“After hearing about the 9/11 remembrance event and hearing there would be a large cross made up of flags, I immediately thought of capturing the cross from the sky,” he said. “I own a drone and this was a perfect opportunity to use it and capture a very unique image.”

Trent Ward, ASCBU executive president and a marketing senior, came up with the idea of the event, which is in its inaugural year. He hopes that it becomes a tradition.

“I want us to be a socially responsible student body, a pro-active student body,” he said. “This is another opportunity for students to express themselves.”

Jason Navarro, a kinesiology senior, placed a flag because he felt it was important to remember everyone who was lost. He was in sixth grade, and although he remembers the events, he did not understand everything that was happening.

“It’s important to let us know what we’ve risen from, how even in the darkest times, there is hope for the future,” he said.

 

CBU Marine candidate captures top fitness award

Daniel Urban

Daniel Urban

California Baptist University students do a variety of things on their summer break: get a job, travel, hang out.

But Daniel Urban spent six weeks at the U.S. Marine Corps Officer Candidates School in Quantico, Va., and received an award for the top physical fitness candidate in his company.

Urban, an officer candidate and a CBU junior, is studying flight aviation and is a member of the varsity wrestling team. He hopes to be a pilot in the Marines.

“I wanted to be part of something that was bigger than me,” he said. “I think the military is great, that whole mentality, the lifestyle, that’s something I’ve always been attracted to.

At the candidates school, studentswere evaluated on their academics, physical fitness and leadership potential. The normal day began at 5 a.m. and ended at 9 p.m., and included physical fitness and classes on Marine Corps history, military skills, ethics and leadership.

For Urban, the toughest part was lack of sleep. Although they had eight hours of free time each night, the students also had to study and do other tasks during those hours.

“That was one of the tougher parts for me, being able to set aside time to study, when I would love to be sleeping,” he said

In order to be a top physical candidate, candidates had to perform well on the physical fitness test (which includes 20 pull-ups and a 3-mile timed run in 18 minutes or less), the combat fitness test (which includes a sprint and carrying and lifting 30-pound ammo cans), the obstacle course, and 4-6 mile conditioning hikes with 45-60 pound hiking packs. Urban had a perfect score on the physical and combat fitness test, and the top score on the obstacle course.

“I just like to work out in general, so I’m always trying to challenge myself, doing new things, trying to lift more, trying to run further, trying to run faster, always trying to keep that mentality,” Urban said.

Capt. Joshua P. Roberts is the USMC Officer Selection Officer Riverside.

“Urban is our all-around most physically fit candidate, but beyond that, he is extremely intelligent,” Roberts said. “He is always professional, enjoys a challenge, and has exceptional time management skills. Urban is a great representative of the quality of student that CBU produces. I only wish I had more candidates like him, as my job would be much easier.”

 

Coach Rick Rowland wins 500th game with the Lancers

Coach Rick Rowland

Coach Rick Rowland

Rick Rowland has spent the past 16 years of his life coaching water polo at California Baptist University. The Lancers leader is known as much by his success as his longevity, perhaps that was never clearer than Sept. 13 when Rowland won his 500th game with CBU.

Ironically enough, after all the games Rowland has coached at the Lancer Aquatics Center, his 500th win came not only on the road but on an entirely different coast, as CBU was competing in Brown University’s Bruno Fall Classic. The Lancers defeated St. Francis 10-6 in their second contest Saturday to usher in the milestone, which also includes Rowland’s wins with the women’s water polo team.

 

 

 Astronaut inspires CBU students to shoot for the stars

Hilmers (2)

Dr. David C. Hilmers

“If you love something, you’re going to do better at it,” Dr. David C. Hilmers told students at California Baptist University. “Find something you are passionate about and work at it as if you’re working for the Lord, not yourself.”

California Baptist University’s College of Allied Health hosted Hilmers on Sept. 15 to kick off its Distinguished Lecture Series. Hilmers is an associate professor at the Department of Internal Medicine and Pediatrics Center for Space Medicine at Baylor College of Medicine. His topic was “To Outer Space and Back: A Doctor’s View of Global Health.”

Hilmers, also a former NASA astronaut on four space shuttle missions, talked about the importance of healthcare globally, not just domestically.

“I think you become more complete as a doctor by going and serving in places you don’t feel comfortable,” he said. “In a place where you don’t have many fancy tests, you really have to rely on your skills.”

Hilmers has volunteered medical aid in more than 40 countries to combat malaria, hepatitis and malnutrition.

“Every medical provider should do a mission trip,” he said. “It will make them a better doctor.”

Prior to his work as a medical provider, Hilmers was a Marine Corps colonel, aviator and electrical engineer and a NASA astronaut.

Although he had a fulfilling career as a marine and astronaut, Hilmers wanted to pursue his childhood dream of becoming a medical practitioner. So, at the age of 42, Hilmers enrolled in medical school at Baylor College of Medicine, working as an astronaut during the day and taking classes during the night. Hilmers was training for his final trip into space aboard the space shuttle Discovery in 1992.

“I finished my classes about two weeks before the start of the mission,” he said.

Following his final mission to space and after fulfilling his goal of becoming a doctor, Hilmers stayed on staff as a faculty member of Baylor College of Medicine.

“The next part of my life began as God told me it was time for me to live out my childhood dream,” he said.

 

New dining options provide students more choices, flexibility

dining

El Monte Grill is one of three new dining options on CBU’s campus.

The addition of new dining facilities at California Baptist University this fall means not only increased food options but also greater flexibility for students.

El Monte Grill and Chick-fil-A, both opened since last month, provide two more options for campus dining. The new Campus Xpress (CX) convenience story is also open for those who want to grab a quick bite to eat. The facilities, along with Wanda’s Place, Brisco’s Café and the Alumni Dining Commons (ADC), are operated by Provider Food Services.

“It gives students more flexibility,” said Kipp Dougherty, director of food services. “As the campus expands and grows, depending upon where they live, where their classes are, what their other activities are, they now have many options all over campus where they can get food.”

Senior Kayla North said she likes the variety the two new restaurants offer without having to go off campus. Junior Yaritza Salas said she frequents El Monte because of its convenience because she spends a lot time in that area of the campus. Junior Rachelle Hardin said having more options mean students won’t tire of the same food. Sophomore Bryce Hargis also liked having the nutritional information that Chick-fil-A offers, since it is a national chain.

Because there are more dining options available for students, the ADC is closed Friday nights and all day Saturday. For the first time, however, Brisco’s Café is open for breakfast seven days a week.

“Because we have a large residential population on that side of the campus, we felt that those students were being underserved having to come all the way to the ADC,” Dougherty said. “It’s a convenience for students. We now have both locations where they can eat.”

This year, the students also have Dining Dollars in addition to their meal swipes. If they just want a smoothie, a coffee or snack, they can use their Dining Dollars, Dougherty said.

“They have more options than they ever had, which is a great thing,” she said.

Meal Service Hours

Chick-fil-A and El Monte Grill

10 a.m.-8 p.m. Monday-Thursday

10 a.m-7 p.m. Friday-Saturday

Closed Sunday

Brisco’s:

7:30 a.m.-11 p.m. Monday-Friday

7:30 a.m.-10:30 p.m. Saturday-Sunday

Wanda’s:

7 a.m.-9 p.m. Monday-Thursday

7 a.m.-7 p.m. Friday

8 a.m.-7 p.m. Saturday

Closed Sunday

CX:

7 a.m.-8 p.m. Monday-Thursday

7 a.m.-7 p.m. Friday

8 a.m.-7 p.m. Saturday

Closed Sunday

ADC:

7-10 a.m. breakfast; 10:30 a.m.-2 p.m. lunch; 4:30-7 p.m. dinner Monday-Friday

Closed Saturday

9:15 a.m.-2 p.m. brunch; 5-6:30 p.m. dinner Sunday

 

CBU advances in 2015 “Best Regional Universities” rankings

2014-08-26-Veneman-Yeager Center-0004U.S. News & World Report has included California Baptist University on its list of the nation’s “Best Colleges” for the ninth straight year. CBU is ranked No. 38 in the West in the publication’s “Best Regional Universities” category for 2015, up from No. 42 in the previous year’s rankings and No.58 in 2013.

The ranking places CBU in the top tier of educational institutions across the nation.

“This year’s ranking once again reflects the improvement in quality that California Baptist University continually strives to provide in order to enhance students’ overall experience,” said Dr. Ronald L. Ellis, CBU president. “Being named a ‘Best Regional University’ in this influential ranking affirms California Baptist University for the value of the educational and related opportunities it offers and also serves to validate the choice that students make to attend CBU.”

‘Best Colleges’ rankings are featured in U.S. News & World Report each year to aid prospective students and their parents looking for the best academic values for their money. Now in its 30th year, the annual comparative listing uses a quantitative system of 16 weighted indicators of academic excellence to rank universities. Those indicators include: student selectivity, retention and graduation rates; assessment by peer institutions; faculty resources; financial resources and alumni giving.

For 2015, the category of Best Regional Universities includes 620 institutions that offer a broad scope of undergraduate degrees and master’s degrees but few, if any, doctoral programs. A full list of the rankings can be viewed at www.usnews.com/colleges.

 

Open house showcases new features in Lancer Plaza North

Lancer PlazaCalifornia Baptist University’s Lancer Plaza North opened this fall with a brand new look and welcomed students and other visitors during an open house on Sept. 5.

Before CBU acquired the 11-acre property in 2006, restaurants and retail stores occupied the shopping center that was known as Adams Plaza. Today, as an integral new part of the CBU campus, the facility offers space for university offices, student areas and a popular new dining facility.

The new occupants are Office of Spiritual Life, Community Life Office, Campus Store, Office of Leadership and Transitions and the Associated Students of California Baptist University (ASCBU). El Monte Grill, a Mexican-themed restaurant, is also located there. The offices recently celebrated the move with a grand opening.

What do the occupants enjoy most about their new location? Space.

“We love everything, the space, the storage room,” said Heather Hubbert, assistant dean of students in the Office of Leadership and Transitions.

“It’s so big, there’s room for meetings and for students to come in,” said Taylor Rilling, graduate assistant for ASCBU.

Most offices housed in the new Lancer Plaza locations moved from the Yeager Center, some from more than one location. The new offices have room for storage, room to grow and for some, the staff is now in one location.

“It’s the first time I’ve been with my staff,” said Chris Hofschroer, assistant dean of students in Community Life. Hofschroer enjoys having staff, storage and recreation rental items all in one location that includes a lounge furnished with Ping-Pong tables and sofas where students can hang out.

“It’s warm and inviting,” he said. “Our students are realizing that.”

Components of the Office of Spiritual Life (OSL) used to be located in four different offices. John Montgomery appreciates having all the staff in one location.

“Having a ‘one-stop’ location for all ministry areas of OSL should make it easier for students to find us,” he said.

Office of Leadership and Transitions was formerly the Campus Life Office. It split into the Office of Leadership and Transitions and University Card Services, which remains in the Yeager Center. The function of the Office of Leadership includes new student orientation, student leadership and the FOCUS (First-year Orientation & Christian University Success) program.

“We love the community,” Hubbert said, referring to the other offices in the complex. “We love having the space for students to visit.”

 

CBU alumni teaching around the world

Top (from left): Jordan Martinez, Mathew Shade, Ryan Atkins, Daniel Rodriguez, Sam Anich; 2nd row: Lauren Whitlock, Laura Waterbury, Ryan Corbin, Wiley Snedeker; 3rd row: Cassandra Kitchen, Joelle Tajima, Katelyn Schwab, Sierra Van Leeuwen; Bottom row: Nicole Jessen Shade, Renee Flannery and Christopher Kyle

Top (from left): Jordan Martinez, Mathew Shade, Ryan Atkins, Daniel Rodriguez, Sam Anich; 2nd row: Lauren Whitlock, Laura Waterbury, Ryan Corbin, Wiley Snedeker; 3rd row: Cassandra Kitchen, Joelle Tajima, Katelyn Schwab, Sierra Van Leeuwen; Bottom row: Nicole Jessen Shade, Renee Flannery and Christopher Kyle

Last year, California Baptist University sent five alumni to teach English at a university in China. This year, 16 are going to China and Japan.

The Teach Abroad Program (TAP) is operated through the Global Initiatives office. Bryan Davis, director of the International Center, said the program has two missions: first, it is designed to help CBU build stronger partnerships with overseas institutions; and second, it helps CBU alumni who want to teach overseas.

“We’ve learned that many CBU students that are looking to teach overseas after graduation to get some experience or because they want to go overseas long term,” Davis said. “We thought, why allow them to continue to go through other placement agencies when we can build a process here for them to teach through the university?”

Every applicant needs to be a CBU graduate, hold a bachelor’s degree and commit to at least one teaching overseas. All the participants earn a certificate for Teaching English as a Foreign Language (TEFL). Predictably, the group includes a fair share of English teachers, Davis said, but it also has attracted students with majors such as journalism, criminal justice and mathematics.

“CBU is such a globally minded place,” he said. “Students here have such a passion for intercultural relationships and global work that we see [students from all majors].”

Cassandra Jo Kitchen (’14) graduated with a major in foundational mathematics and will be teaching at a high school in China. While she will be teaching English through TAP, her ultimate goal is teach math.

“I have worries or fears of not reaching my students, getting homesick, eating different foods and not knowing the language, but that is what drives me to go.” she said. “I am so comfortable in my American world that I believe a little discomfort will be good for me.”

CBU provided the group with six weeks of training over the summer including lesson planning, teaching methods and cross-cultural understanding. They also received practical experience while teaching more than 400 international students who came to CBU for language camps.

 

Family Updates

From left: Dr. Ronald L. Ellis and Mark Takano

From left: Dr. Ronald L. Ellis and Mark Takano

Dr. Ronald L. Ellis, CBU president, recently hosted Mark Takano, U.S. Representative for California’s 41st congressional district. It was Takano’s first visit to California Baptist University.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Dr. Grace Ni

Dr. Grace Ni

Dr. Grace Ni, associate professor of electrical and computer engineering, presented a paper titled Analyzing the Nonlinearity of Binary Phase Detector in Phase-Locked Loops at the 2014 IEEE International Symposium on  Radio-Frequency Integration Technology in Hefei, China, Aug. 27-30. The paper was co-authored with Xuelin Xu, principle engineer at Luxtera Inc., who also serves as an industrial curriculum partner to Dr. Ni’s courses in electronics.

 

 

 

 

Face2FaceCBU students were featured in the Southern Baptist International Mission Board’s Commission Stories. The students were part of the IMB’s Face2Face summer program, which sends students overseas for two months of discipleship and ministry. To read the article, click here.

 

 

 

Dr. Mary Ann Pearson

Dr. Mary Ann Pearson

Dr. Patricia Hernandez

Dr. Patricia Hernandez

Dr. Mary Ann Pearson, associate professor of public relations in Online and Professional Studies, presented a webinar for Give Big Riverside County on Pinterest and Instagram Sept. 5. More than 25 attendees from area nonprofits learned how to use these image based social media sites to deliver messages, gain support and raise funds. Also, Dr. Patricia Hernandez, assistant professor of communication in Online and Professional Studies, and Pearson presented a workshop on internships and social media to business owners and nonprofits in downtown Riverside Sept. 9. The meeting promoted the second year of the CBU OPS and Riverside Downtown Partnership internship program. Pearson also wrote an article titled Mentoring Online to Facilitate Internships, which was published in the Sept. 15 issue of Connect, a publication of the International Mentoring Association.

 

Dr. Hyun-Woo Park

Dr. Hyun-Woo Park

Dr. Hyun-Woo Park, professor of biology, co-authored a paper titled Protein crystal structure obtained at 2.9 Å resolution from injecting bacterial cells into an X-ray free-electron laser beam, which was published Sept. 2 in the proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.

 

 

 

 

Dr. Chris Morgan

Dr. Chris Morgan

Dr. Anthony Chute

Dr. Anthony Chute

Dr. Chris Morgan and Dr. Anthony Chute, dean and associate dean of the School of Christian Ministries respectively, recently had three of their books highlighted in Preaching Magazine’s The Preacher’s Guide to Best in Bibles and Bible Reference of 2014. The books included The Community of Jesus: A Theology of the Church (B&H); Fallen: A Theology of Sin (Crossway); and Why We Belong: Evangelical Unity and Denominational Diversity (Crossway).

 

 

 

From left: Dirk Dallas, Dr. Lisa Bursch, Dr. Steve Betts, Dr. Betsy Morris, Dr. Rebecca Meyer, Dr. Carol Minton and Dr. Susan Drummond

From left: Dirk Dallas, Dr. Lisa Bursch, Dr. Steve Betts, Dr. Betsy Morris, Dr. Rebecca Meyer, Dr. Carol Minton and Dr. Susan Drummond

The University Assessment Committee presented its Best Awards for 2013-2014 Sept. 9. Certificates were awarded included Dirk Dallas, College of Architecture, Visual Arts, and Design, Best Rookie Coordinator; Dr. Lisa Bursch, School of Nursing, Best Program Review; Dr. Steve Betts, School of Music, Best College/School Assessment Coordinator; Dr. Betsy Morris, Online and Professional Studies,  Best Overall Assessment Coordinator; Dr. Rebecca Meyer, School of Nursing, Best Program Review,  Dr. Carol Minton, School of Behavioral Sciences, Best Improved Assessment; and Dr. Susan Drummond, School of Nursing, Best Program Review.

Best Awards recognize the excellent work and achievements accomplished by the identified assessment coordinators. Annual assessment and periodic program review are vital processes designed to better serve CBU students by seeking continual improvement in all academic programs.

 

 

Dr. Daniel Prather

Dr. Daniel Prather

Dr. Daniel Prather, chair of the department of aviation science, taught a four-day airport operations course in Nashville, Tenn. to 50 airport professionals on behalf of the American Association of Airport Executives, Aug. 25-28.

 

 

 

 

The department of aviation science welcomed 55 students to campus Sept. 5 during the 2nd Annual Aviation Science Welcome Dinner. Students, faculty and staff were treated to a Q&A session with a panel of aviation industry experts, including pilots from Skywest Airlines and Delta Airlines, the Southwest Airlines manager of dispatch standards, an aviation planner with RBF Consulting and a senior aviation maintenance technician with FedEx. Students Lacey Schimming and Jennifer Endeman were awarded the Aviation Science Chair’s Scholarship.

Students in the department of aviation science produced a video highlighting the very first year of CBU’s aviation science program. To view the video, click here.

 

Dr. Angela Brand

Dr. Angela Brand

Dr. Toni Dingman

Dr. Toni Dingman

Dr. Scott Key

Dr. Scott Key

Dr. Gayne Anacker

Dr. Gayne Anacker

Dr. Gayne Anacker, dean of the College of Arts and Sciences, served as program director for the C.S. Lewis Foundation’s recent C.S. Lewis Summer Institute, which carried the theme Oxbridge 2014–Reclaiming the Virtues: Human Flourishing in the 21st Century. The conference was held July 21-31 in Oxford and Cambridge, England at the University of Oxford and the University of Cambridge. Anacker also served as co-leader for the Great Books Seminar and presented the paper Natural Law and the Recent Turn toward Virtue Ethics in the special session of the Academic Roundtable. Dr. Scott Key, professor of philosophy, served as director of the Academic Roundtable and presented a paper titled Toward an Epistemology of Value: Wisdom and Trust in Aristotle’s Ethics and the Gospel of Mark. Dr. Toni Dingman, associate professor of English, and Dr. Angela Brand, associate professor of music, also presented papers. Dingman’s paper was titled Lewis, the Law of Human Nature and the Crisis of Modern Civility, while Brand presented Research and Presence:  Finding Virtue in Musical Manuscripts.

 

CAHThe College of Allied Health hosted its first Welcome Back Rally on Sept. 4 with more than 650 students, faculty, and staff in attendance. The event was held at the Recreation Center and included faculty introductions, academic information, social media announcements and multiple contests to win a CBU Beach Cruiser, $25 to the Apple Store, and gift cards for on-campus dining. This was a great opportunity for students within the College to connect with their faculty and department chairs, and to meet Clinical Coordinator Lori Torres. The Office of Career Services was also present, providing helpful information to juniors and seniors looking for internship and employment opportunities. Tiffany Hendricks, a freshman, won the CBU Beach Cruiser after competing in a trivia competition and mirror-dance competition.

 

Dr. Monica O'Rourke

Dr. Monica O’Rourke

Dr. Monica O’Rourke, associate professor of kinesiology for Online and Professional Studies, had her theory and research in kinesiology highlighted in a textbook titled Applied Health Fitness Psychology, published by Human Kinetics Publications.  The book includes O’Rourke’s theory of psychological motivation for lifelong fitness and her research of situational factors for exercise.

 

 

 

Dr. Linn Carothers (far right) with students from Notre Dame High School

Dr. Linn Carothers (extreme right) with students from Notre Dame High School

Dr. Linn Carothers, professor of mathematics, and Dr. Ricardo Cordero-Soto, assistant professor of mathematics, have partnered with CBU alumnus Nicholas Janzen ‘12, mathematics teacher at Notre Dame High School, to bring Notre Dame High School students to campus for a Bridge to Supercomputing program. Students will receive instruction in construction and programming of supercomputers, dynamical systems, stochastic processes, computational methods and modeling. Thirteen students attended the first session on Aug. 23.

 

 

 

 

 

Stewart Undem

Stewart Undem

Stewart Undem, adjunct professor of music, recently returned from a summer tour of Australia as lead trombonist in the Glenn Miller Orchestra. The band, one of two licensed in the U.S. by Glenn Miller Products Inc., exclusively travels overseas. The Australian tour included 57 concerts.

 

 

 

 

Dr. Kenneth Minesinger

Dr. Kenneth Minesinger

Dr. Kenneth Minesinger, associate professor of law for Online & Professional Studies, recently edited an article for the State Bar of California’s Business Law News titled Protecting the Tax Refunds of Consolidated Tax Filers in Bankruptcy.

 

 

 

 

 

Dr. A. Abdelmessih

Dr. A. Abdelmessih

Dr. A. Abdelmessih, professor of mechanical engineering, was a delegate to the 15th International Heat Transfer Conference Aug. 12. Abdelmessih presented an article titled Blinking and Temperature Gradients in Normal Functioning Human Eye. The International Heat Transfer Conference is the world’s premier conference for scientists and engineers in the heat and mass transfer research community, who convene every four years to exchange the latest information.  The acceptance rate for this refereed international conference was 53 percent. Abdelmessih also served as an associate editor for the International Heat Transfer Conference Proceedings.

 

 

Dayna Herrera, Dr. Hewitt Matthews and Dr. Nicole MacDonald

Dayna Herrera, Dr. Hewitt Matthews and Dr. Nicole MacDonald

Forty-eight faculty members from the College of Allied Health, School of Behavioral Health Sciences and the School of Nursing attended a two-day workshop on CBU’s campus titled Called2Collaborate an Interprofessional Education: A Faculty Workshop.The workshop was presented by the Called2Collaborate faculty committee consisting of Dayna Herrera (chair), Dr. Nicole MacDonald (co-chair), Dr. Jolene Baker, Dr. Kenneth Pearce, Dr. Meg Barth, Dr. Susan Drummond, and Dr. Carol Minton. This workshop provided an opportunity for university faculty to understand the national initiative on interprofessional education (IPE) and to work with multiple health related disciplines in planning IPE activities for use with students. Dr. Hewitt Matthews, vice president of health sciences at Mercer University, was keynote speaker.

 

 

Personnel Updates

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