A newsletter for faculty and staff of California Baptist University

July 24, 2014

In this issue…

Current News

CBU team uses training in East Africa

From left: Daniela Medina and Isabel Archuleta, CBU students, and Dr. Jodi Baker, associate professor of kinesiology, pose with a patient.

From left: Daniela Medina and Isabel Archuleta, CBU students, and Dr. Jodi Baker, associate professor of kinesiology, pose with a patient.

A volunteer team from California Baptist University’s College of Allied Health has returned from East Africa after working for three weeks providing healthcare. Three faculty and 10 students used their skills and training to help a fieldworker who is a physical therapist.

The team had a four-tiered strategy, said Dr. Sean Sullivan, chair of the department of kinesiology, who was a member of the team.  In addition to working with the fieldworker, giving rehabilitative care in a hospital, they also provided health education at the hospital, a physical education class at a school and worked in a fitness facility.

Although the patients were diverse, the primary group for rehabilitative care were women who were house workers with low-back injuries, Sullivan said. And because the local infrastructure isn’t the same as in the U.S., the group worked with a minimal amount of equipment.

“Students had to be creative in how they treated patients,” Sullivan said. “Many of them realized how advanced the training is (at CBU and in the U.S.) and how privileged they are to have access to the types of tools that they have. I think many of them realized that they took for granted what most people didn’t even have access to. That was part of the learning experience, as well as to see patients who were really grateful for any type of service that could be offered.”

It was the second consecutive year that Sullivan helped lead a team to East Africa as CBU builds a relationship with the fieldworker.

“This was a great second step in an ongoing relationship for the college and for the university in Africa and God seems to be blessing it,” he said. “It was confirmation from God that He can use me and other faculty in real ways as we lead students to integrate their faith in service to others in specific ways according to their training. And it was also a reminder that we can serve others using our professional training anywhere.”

 

CBU hosts international music festival

music festival

Students perform before a panel of judges at the Hope-CBU International Music Festival.

About 50 students from China competed July 18-19 at California Baptist University in the inaugural Hope-CBU International Music Festival.

The students, ranging in age from 7 to 30, sang and played instruments, such as piano, double bass, cello and oboe. Judges consisted of a Chinese piano teacher and several faculty members from CBU’s School of Music.

Dr. Steve Betts, professor of music, was one of the judges for the piano category.

“Every person brings his or her own experience to the performance of music,” he said. “The events of each individual’s life and the depth of his or her insight concerning the piece he or she is performing bring a unique perspective to each performance.”

Winners received 1st and 2nd place awards. The other participants received honorable mention certificates.

The festival was a great way to showcase CBU and the quality of its music program, said Dr. Larry Linamen, vice president of global initiatives.

“We want our music program to be known across China.”

This summer more than 400 international students walked across CBU’s campus for language camps. All the camps included an English language and American cultural component. Groups included Colegio Batista Mineiro from Brazil, Ningbo City College of Vocational Technology from China and Affiliated Middle School to Jilin University from China.

 

Athletic training program achieves 10-year accreditation

Students work on simulators during an athletic training lab.

Students work on simulators during an athletic training lab.

California Baptist University’s athletic training program has received continuing accreditation for 10 years from the Commission on Accreditation of Athletic Training Education (CAATE).

The entry-level master’s program in the College of Allied Health, the first of its kind in California, had previously been accredited for five years in 2009 when the first students were preparing to graduate. Ten-year accreditation is the most a program can receive.

The program had to complete a self-study and submit to an accreditation visit to ensure it met the nationally recognized standards, said Dr. Nicole MacDonald, associate professor of kinesiology and program director for the athletic training education program. Those standards include having the right number of faculty and the proper equipment, as well as implementing health and safety procedures. It also must maintain a 70 percent first-time pass rate of the Board of Certification exam for a three-year aggregate. The percentage of CBU graduates passing the exam the past three years ranges from 88.24 percent to 100 percent.

Up to 20 students are accepted each year into the program. They complete a minimum of eight clinical rotations, giving the students experience in high school, collegiate, clinic and general medical environments.

MacDonald said the program is not about personal training or coaching but is more like medical care for the physically active. The 10-year accreditation is the culmination of hard work by both faculty and students.

“I was pretty excited, she said. “We expected it, but we’re still working hard. It shows our program is solid. It’s a big indicator we are doing the right things.”

Graduates of the CBU athletic training program have gone into careers with professional sports teams, olympic sport, universities, high schools and clinics.

 

CBU School of Behavioral Sciences announces new dean

Dr. Jacqueline Gustafson

Dr. Jacqueline Gustafson

Dr. Jacqueline Gustafson, a native of Washington, is the new dean of California Baptist University’s School of Behavioral Sciences.

Gustafson, who began her new role July 1, comes from Northwest University in Kirkland, Wash., a private Christian school of 1,740 students. At that institution, she was the associate dean for academic programs in the College of Social and Behavioral Sciences.

Gustafson worked at Northwest University in various positions for 14 years. She was ready for a new opportunity, she said.

“It was excellent timing. I think God’s provision was definitely in that.”

Gustafson moved to Riverside with her husband, David, and 6-year-old son, Abraham.

For now, she is busy settling in at CBU and the School of Behavioral Sciences, which has more than 400 undergraduate students and more than 300 in the graduate programs.

“My goal is really just to come and learn the culture of CBU and of the School of Behavioral Sciences and then create a plan for how we can take that existing culture and grow from that,” Gustafson said. “I’m very much of the philosophy of wanting to grow programs out of the existing dreams and skill sets in the School of Behavioral Sciences. I hope that I can bring my skills to the table to help make that happen.”

Gustafson, who also will be teaching Theories of Personality in the fall and advising graduate students on their theses, says education is her passion.

“Regardless of the specific class I’m teaching, my primary lens is that of an educator,” she said. “We have the content, but I’ll be thinking just as much about the types of students, how they learn, different models we can approach in the classroom, different ways we can innovate our programming.”

Gustafson also brings to CBU an interest in global studies, which was her focus in her doctoral program.

“As we’re studying psychology and how the human mind works and behavior is shaped, we need to do so within the context of understanding that we live in a globalized world,” she said. “We have a tremendous opportunity to respond to that challenge and to help serve in the midst of that culture.”

 

CBU announces “Gordon and Jill Bourns College of Engineering”

Bourns releaseOfficials at California Baptist University have announced the naming of the “Gordon and Jill Bourns College of Engineering” in honor of the Riverside couple’s longstanding support for the CBU engineering program.

Dr. Ronald L. Ellis, CBU president, said the naming recognizes the Bourns’ recent $5.5 million lead gift in the college’s “Equipping for Impact” campaign. Ellis said it was the largest single gift from individuals ever received by CBU and provided an auspicious launch for the fundraising campaign.

“I am very grateful to Gordon and Jill for their continuing support of California Baptist University and for this latest example of their wonderful generosity,” Ellis said. “This gift demonstrates their strong commitment to help prepare the engineers of the future and, more than that, it models an amazing spirit of philanthropy that I believe can inspire others to join us in funding this exciting project.”

Gordon Bourns is chairman and CEO of Bourns Inc., a leading manufacturer and supplier of electronic components. He also is chairing the campaign to fund construction of a new building to house the CBU engineering college that now bears his name along with that of his wife.

“We thought this would be a tremendous opportunity to share the blessings God has given us and to inspire others to give also,” Bourns said. “We are thankful for the opportunity to serve the Lord by serving CBU.”

The Bourns’ lead gift in the campaign is the latest demonstration of the couple’s support for the private university’s engineering program. A previous contribution in 2008 was recognized with the naming of the Bourns Engineering Laboratory at CBU.

Campaign proceeds will help fund construction of a planned three-story building encompassing 100,000 square feet of classrooms and state of the art equipment for the Gordon and Jill Bourns College of Engineering. Preliminary plans for the innovative building design will utilize green technology and sustainable construction, and feature two blocks of classroom, faculty and administrative space bracketing a massive engineering hall, providing multipurpose space for labs, projects, exhibits, presentations and student collaboration, as well as an interactive studio for K-12 STEM education.

 

CBU and Zhejiang Medical College enter partnership

China story

Dr. Larry Linamen (second front left), vice president of global initiatives, signs an agreement with Zhejiang Medical College during a formal a formal ceremony in China.

California Baptist University and Zhejiang Medical College in China are collaborating on a program that can help Chinese students obtain a degree in health care.

Dr. Larry Linamen, vice president of global initiatives, recently signed the document in a formal ceremony in China.

“This is the first program we’ve had that the government of China has approved,” Linamen said. “It is a big step for us because there is a tremendous amount of paperwork in getting these projects formally approved.”

Students will attend Zhejiang Medical College for three years and will continue their studies at CBU for two years. Upon completion, students will receive a Bachelor of Science degree in healthcare administration from California Baptist University.

CBU is recruiting students entering Zhejiang this fall, so those students would start attending CBU in 2017, said Dr. Charles Sands, dean of CBU’s College of Allied Health.

The program provides opportunities for international students who graduate to return to China with newly obtained skills. It also gives CAH faculty an opportunity to teach in China. Beginning next year, one or two CBU faculty members will teach in China for about a month.

 

Family Updates

Dr. C. Fyne Nsofor

Dr. C. Fyne Nsofor

Dr. C. Fyne Nsofor, associate professor of intercultural studies, was appointed associated editor of Missiology, the journal of the American Society of Missiology, beginning July 2014. Nsofor’s primary function will be to read and review journal articles submitted for publication. The journal is a forum for the exchange of ideas and research between missiologists and others interested in related subjects.

 

 

 

 

Dr. Elaine Ahumada

Dr. Elaine Ahumada

The Inland Empire Chapter of the American Society of Public Administration awarded three CBU graduate students in public administration scholarships at the organization’s annual awards banquet June 26. Michele Nissen was awarded a $1,000 scholarship, while Rachel McClure and Renee Poselski each received a $500 scholarship. Dr. Elaine Ahumada, chair of the department of history and government and program director for the master of public administration degree program, served as president of the chapter for a two-year term and will serve as chapter secretary beginning in September.

 

 

Noah Pryfogle with children and baseball equipment donated by Dr. Sean Sullivan, Dr. David Pearson and Gary Adcock.

Noah Pryfogle and Ugandan children with baseball equipment donated by Dr. Sean Sullivan, Dr. David Pearson and Gary Adcock.

Pam Pryfogle, adjunct faculty for Online and Professional Studies, recently traveled to Northern Uganda with her son and grandson, Michael and Noah Pryfogle, to complete her doctoral research and to host a Bible conference for women. Pryfogle’s son and grandson assisted with research and taught baseball to area children. Baseball equipment was donated by Dr. Sean Sullivan, chair of the department of kinesiology; Dr. David Pearson professor of kinesiology; and Gary Adcock, head coach of Lancers men’s baseball. For more about the Pryfogles’ travels in Northern Uganda, visit http://travelinggrace.wordpress.com

 

 

 

 

Parther, Daniel

Dr. Daniel Prather

Dr. Daniel Prather, professor and chair of the department of aviation science, taught four-day airport operations courses on behalf of the American Association of Airport Executives at the Port Authority of New York/New Jersey, as well as Phoenix Sky Harbor International Airport.

 

 

 

 

Sullivan Sean_fa_0038

Dr. Sean Sullivan

Dr. Wayne Fletcher

Dr. Wayne Fletcher

Dr. David Pearson

Dr. David Pearson

Dr. Charles Sands

Dr. Charles Sands

Dr. Sean Sullivan, chair of the department of kinesiology; Dr. Wayne Fletcher, chair of the department of health sciences; Dr. David Pearson, professor of kinesiology; and Dr. Charles Sands, dean of the School of Allied Health, all recently served at the Sandals Church Sports Camp.

 

 

Dr. Anne-Marie Larsen

Dr. Anne-Marie Larsen

Dr. Anne-Marie Larsen, associate professor of psychology and director of the graduate program in forensic psychology, presented research titled Heuristics of Women in Murder at the Western Psychological Association annual meeting in Portland, Ore. The presentation was a joint collaboration with CBU students Johanna Covarrubias and Taylor Baines. Several recent graduates of the forensic psychology graduate program presented posters at the meeting: Tiawna Jones, who presented research on the negative effects of pretrial publicity; Alison Peacock, who presented her work on the Women Wonder Writers program’s impact on self-esteem and self-efficacy; and Collette Strosnider, who presented research on infanticide.

 

 

Dr. David Isaacs

Dr. David Isaacs

Dr. David Isaacs, assistant professor of English, presented a paper at the Film and Media 2014 Conference at the University of London in June. His paper, Will Smith and the White Imaginary in Independence Day, explored portrayals of race in the popular sci-fi film.

 

 

 

 

Dr. Melissa Antonio (left) acts as a general biology class instructor introducing the learning goals of a class activity on concepts behind cell signaling.

Dr. Melissa Antonio (left) acts as a general biology class instructor introducing the learning goals of a class activity on concepts behind cell signaling.

Dr. Melissa Antonio, assistant professor of biology, attended the National Academies Summer Institute on Scientific Teaching June 22-27 at the University of California, Riverside. The institute, sponsored by the Howard Hughes Medical Institute, provided intensive training for faculty to sharpen teaching skills through evidence-based teaching methods designed to transform the undergraduate STEM (science, technology, engineering and mathematics) classroom.

 

 

 

 

 

Athena

From left: Debbi Guthrie, senior vice president of Raincross Hospitality Corp.; Channing Perea; and Darla Donaldson.

ATHENA of Riverside awarded CBU alumna Channing Perea a $1,000 scholarship May 28 as part of its ongoing mission to open doors of leadership opportunity for women through inspiration, education, cultivation and mentoring. Darla Donaldson, assistant professor of finance and social entrepreneurship, introduced Perea.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Dr. Jeff Cate

Dr. Jeff Cate

Dr. Jeff Cate, professor of New Testament, presented a paper titled Who Was Crucified and Where? The Case for Kaikos in Revelation 11:8 at the International Meeting of the Society of Biblical Literature in Vienna, Austria on Tuesday, July 8, 2014.

 

 

 

 

From left: Rodney Couch (Provider), Joe Adcock (CBU), Kent Dacus (CBU), Kevin Murray (Provider), Calvin Sparkman (CBU), Nora Garcia (Provider), Kipp Dougherty (Provider), Anthony Lammons (CBU), Eric Da Costa (Provider) and Mitch Holt (Provider).

From left: Rodney Couch (Provider), Joe Adcock (CBU), Kent Dacus (CBU), Kevin Murray (Provider), Calvin Sparkman (CBU), Nora Garcia (Provider), Kipp Dougherty (Provider), Anthony Lammons (CBU), Eric Da Costa (Provider) and Mitch Holt (Provider).

Nineteen CBU staff and Provider Food Service staff attended Chick-fil-A licensee training in Atlanta, Ga., June 18-19 in anticipation of opening the on-campus Chick-fil-A in the Fall 2014 semester.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Dr. William Flores

Dr. William Flores

Dr. William Flores, associate professor of Spanish and director of the Spanish program, is author of a book review published in the June 2014 edition of Hispania. The review is titled Scolieri, Paul A. Dancing the New World: Aztecs, Spaniards, and the Choreography of Conquest. Flores also participated at the McGraw-Hill Education’s Spring 2014 Spanish Symposium held in Los Angeles April 24-25. To view the review published in Hispania, click here.

 

 

 

These three WanBang middle school students are part of the Skype pen pal program. The girls are sitting under a sign that publically proclaims the WanBang school motto.

These three WanBang middle school students are part of the Skype pen pal program. The girls are sitting under a sign that publically proclaims the WanBang school motto.

The multiple and single subject credential programs have unofficially partnered with WanBang school in Harbin China. The program includes (1) CBU students using Skype to tutor the WanBang students and (2) using Skype to create modern pen pal relationships between middle and high school students in the U.S. and China. If you know individuals who would like to become part of either program, contact Dr. Keith Walters, associate professor of education.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Dr. Creed Jones

Dr. Creed Jones

Dr. Matthew Rickard

Dr. Matthew Rickard

Dr. Matthew Rickard, associate professor of engineering and chair of bioengineering, presented a paper on June 22 titled Experimental Investigation of Radio Frequency Identification Range for Intraocular Implants at BioMed 2014, the 11th International Conference on Biomedical Engineering meeting in Zurich, Switzerland. Co-authors of the peer-reviewed paper are Dr. Creed Jones, professor of software engineering, and three recent engineering graduates: Max M. Migdal, Nathaniel A. Reyes and Alexander D. Murguia. Rickard also was awarded to new patents, both of which control eye pressure for mitigating glaucomatous damage.

 

Sarah Pearce

Sarah Pearce

Dayna Herrera

Dayna Herrera

Dayna Herrera, assistant professor of nursing, and Sarah Pearce, School of Nursing lab assistant, gave a presentation titled The Art of Simulation: Developing, Creating, and Utilizing/Integrating Video Simulation In the Classroom and the Community at the International Nursing Simulation/Learning Resource Centers Conference, which met June 20th in Orlando, Fla. Pearce also made a presentation titled The Art of Instructional Acting: A guide for Training Undergraduate Theatre Students to Become Standardized Patients at the same meeting.

 

 

Dr. Chuck Sands

Dr. Charles Sands

Dr. Charles Sands, dean of the College of Allied Health, has been appointed to the Christian Medical & Dental Associations (CMDA) “The Commission for Advancing Medical Missions (CAMM). A CMDA commission is a group of volunteers that performs a ministry that CMDA may not have the administrative resources to accomplish. Commissions have access to CMDA’s 16,000 members, services, databases and infrastructure.

 

 

 

andymusserweddingAndy Musser (’12), financial aid counselor, married Kaleen Musich (’12) on June 15th.

 

 

 

 

 

The Payne family

The Payne family

Denise (Roscoe) Payne, credential analyst, and Andrew Payne were married on June 28, 2014 in Riverside. Andrew is employed with the Riverside County District Attorney’s Office. They live in Riverside with their three children, Michaela, Haley and Kevin.

 

 

 

 

 

Sivan - Newborn-8

Sivan Bradley Clark Winter

Dr. Natalie C. Winter, associate professor of business, her husband Aldee and daughter Aleida welcomed a baby boy to the family on June 3. The baby’s name is Sivan Bradley Clark Winter.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Judah Killian Ernst

Judah Killian Ernst

Megan Ernst, student accounts counselor, and her husband Chris welcomed a son, Judah Killian Ernst, on July 10.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Brittany and Taylor Neece with twins Cohen Michael Neece, Jones Andrew Neece and 2-year-old Norah.

Brittany and Taylor Neece with twins Cohen Michael Neece, Jones Andrew Neece and 2-year-old Norah.

Brittany Neece, lecturer in the School of Behavioral Sciences, and Taylor Neece, director of graduate admissions, welcomed twin boys on July 8. Cohen Michael Neece weighed 6 pounds, 14 ounces and Jones Andrew Neece weighed 6 pounds.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Personnel Updates

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