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History & Government

College of Arts and Sciences

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Bachelor of Arts in History

Are you intrigued by the life paths of the greats, the triumphs and tragedies of humanity, and the witnessing of the workings of God throughout the human timeline? Do you want to learn the lessons the past has to teach you so that you can effectively engage the future with an intelligent, biblical worldview? If you are passionate about studying history and committed to strengthening your Christian faith, then you should enroll as a history major at California Baptist University. With a faculty team of full-time historians who are authentic Christians and excellent teachers, this department shines in the area of faith integration and strong student mentoring.

A Bachelor of Arts in History will prepare you for fulfilling careers in both the private and public sectors. As a student of history, you will develop critical thinking and problem-solving skills, as well as strong communication skills, which will prepare you to be an exceptional employee. You can also choose to continue your academic studies at the graduate level.

What Can I Do With This Major?

Student Learning Outcomes

1. History majors should be able to express coherently an appreciation of religious, philosophical, and cultural diversity.

2. History majors should have a grasp of the meaning and significance of European history, American history, and Non-Western history and their impact on World history.

3. History majors should have demonstrated in written or oral form an ability to consider various understandings of history and historical methodologies and the impact of each upon understandings of religious tradition, political processes, and personal and cultural identity.

4. History majors should be knowledgeable of the historical impact of Christianity and the Biblical revelation upon the development of Western culture.

5. History majors should develop an appreciation of the contribution and struggle for recognition, franchise, and power, within a democracy, by marginalized groups in American history such as: women, African Americans, Native Americans, and others.

6. Majors in History should be able to demonstrate in written and oral form engagement in a personal faith-pilgrimage which enables the integration of faith and reason, the development of value-based character, and a commitment to the service of God and human culture.

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Career Opportunities

  • Documentary editor
  • Foreign Service Officer
  • Journalist
  • Legislative analyst
  • Librarian
  • College professor
  • Museum archivist
  • Public historian
  • Teacher (elementary, middle, or secondary)
  • Writer
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Traditional Program Requirements

Complete the following 36 units

Lower Division Requirements

HIS223 History of US Since Civil War

HIS223 History of US Since Civil War

A continuation of HIS 213. May be taken before HIS 213. (3 units; Multicultural; Fall/Spring)

  Course Sec Instructor Dates Days Time Location
Summer 2016 HIS223-A A Hinrichs, Troy 05/02/2016 Monday, Wednesday 10:00 AM - 12:00 PM Yeager Center
B222
Fall 2016 HIS223-A A STAFF, STAFF 09/06/2016 Monday, Wednesday, Friday 10:45 AM - 11:45 AM Sch Business Building
204
Fall 2016 HIS223-C C STAFF, STAFF 09/06/2016 Tuesday, Thursday 10:30 AM - 12:00 PM Yeager Center
A111
Fall 2016 HIS223-B B Barnes, Jeffrey A. 09/06/2016 Tuesday, Thursday 8:45 AM - 10:15 AM Yeager Center
A111
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HUM213 Integrated Humanities I

HUM213 Integrated Humanities I

The course consists of interrelations of history, art, literature, music, and philosophy. It covers the culture-epochs from the Ancient River-Valley Civilizations through the Medieval period. (Meets the Non-US History general education requirement.) (3 units; Interdisciplinary; Multicultural; Fall/Spring)

  Course Sec Instructor Dates Days Time Location
Fall 2016 HUM213-B B Blincoe, Mark E. 09/06/2016 Monday, Wednesday, Friday 10:45 AM - 11:45 AM Yeager Center
B259
Fall 2016 HUM213-A A Blincoe, Mark E. 09/06/2016 Monday, Wednesday, Friday 12:00 PM - 1:00 PM Yeager Center
B259
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HUM223 Integrated Humanities II

HUM223 Integrated Humanities II

The course consists of interrelations of history, art, literature, music, and philosophy. It covers the culture-epochs from the Renaissance to contemporary times. (Meets the Non-US History general education requirement.) (3 units; Interdisciplinary; Multicultural; Fall/Spring)

  Course Sec Instructor Dates Days Time Location
Fall 2016 HUM223-A A Brook, Eric C 09/06/2016 Monday, Wednesday, Friday 9:30 AM - 10:30 AM Yeager Center
B112
Fall 2016 HUM223-B B Brook, Eric C 09/06/2016 Tuesday, Thursday 8:45 AM - 10:15 AM Yeager Center
B259
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Upper Division Requirements

HIS490 Historiography

HIS490 Historiography

This course is designed to provide the student with knowledge about the history of historical writing and research by analyzing the work of important past historians and various philosophies, theories, and perspectives on the nature of history itself. Emphasis will also be given to understanding history from a Christian perspective. (3 units; Fall)

  Course Sec Instructor Dates Days Time Location
Fall 2016 HIS490-A A Davis-Hayes, Kenya 09/06/2016 Monday, Wednesday, Friday 10:45 AM - 11:45 AM Mission Hall
127
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HIS499 Senior Project

HIS499 Senior Project

A senior capstone course designed to demonstrate the competence of History majors in the discipline and showcase their research and writing skills. The portfolio produced by the student in completion of this project must conform to the departmental guidelines for Senior Projects. Prerequisite: HIS 490 and Senior status. (3 units; Spring)

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American History Elective Requirement

Complete three (3) units from the following:

HIS311 Minorities in America

HIS311 Minorities in America

The role of minorities in the development of America. Principal areas of focus are immigration and the immigrant experience and the ethnic experiences of Blacks, Indians, and Hispanics. (3 units; Interdisciplinary; Multicultural; Fall/Spring)

  Course Sec Instructor Dates Days Time Location
Fall 2016 HIS311-A A Davis-Hayes, Kenya 09/06/2016 Monday, Wednesday, Friday 8:15 AM - 9:15 AM Sch Business Building
250
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HIS383 The West in American History

HIS383 The West in American History

A study of the westward movement of the American frontier from the colonies to the Pacific with emphasis on the significant role of the frontier in the development of American ideals and institutions. (3 units; Multicultural; As offered)

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HIS393 History of California

HIS393 History of California

The social, economic, and political development of California from its discovery to the present. The latter part of the course is thematic in presentation (i.e., agriculture, transportation, water, etc.). (3 units; Interdisciplinary; Multicultural; Fall/Spring)

  Course Sec Instructor Dates Days Time Location
Fall 2016 HIS393-A A STAFF, STAFF 09/06/2016 Monday, Wednesday, Friday 9:30 AM - 10:30 AM Yeager Center
B218
Fall 2016 HIS393-B B STAFF, STAFF 09/06/2016 Tuesday, Thursday 2:00 PM - 3:30 PM Sch Business Building
204
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HIS401 Special Topics in U.S. History

HIS401 Special Topics in U.S. History

Course concentrates on a specific topic in U.S. History. May be repeated once with change in topic. (3 units; As offered)

  Course Sec Instructor Dates Days Time Location
Summer 2016 HIS401-A A Barnes, Jeffrey A. 05/02/2016 Tuesday, Thursday 10:00 AM - 12:00 PM Sch Business Building
250
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HIS472 Colonial America, 1607-1787

HIS472 Colonial America, 1607-1787

This course will examine the thirteen English colonies in North America from the founding of Jamestown through the ratification of the Constitution. Topics such as the establishment of colonial corporate power, religious controversy and freedom, the entrenchment of African slavery, wars with Native communities and the emergence of modern political thought will define this course. (3 units; Multicultural; As offered)

  Course Sec Instructor Dates Days Time Location
Fall 2016 HIS472-A A Davis-Hayes, Kenya 09/06/2016 Tuesday, Thursday 12:15 PM - 1:45 PM Yeager Center
B221
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HIS474 Early American Rpblic, 1787-1848

HIS474 Early American Rpblic, 1787-1848

This course will examine the establishment of the new United States under the Constitution. Topics such as internal development, westward expansion, social and religious movements, democratization and sectional crises leading to the Civil War define this course. (3 units; Multicultural; As offered)

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HIS475 Civil War/Politcl Crises 1848-65

HIS475 Civil War/Politcl Crises 1848-65

This course will examine both the causes and experiences of the American Civil War. Beginning with the ongoing crises leading to the War, this course will include the election of Lincoln, Southern secession, the role of slavery in the war, and experiences on the battlefield. (3 units; As offered)

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HIS476 The Emergence of Modern America

HIS476 The Emergence of Modern America

This course will examine American life between the end of the Civil War and WWI. It will emphasize national reconstruction post-Civil War, westward expansion, the rise of industry, urbanization and immigration as well as the US experience in global imperialization and world war. (3 units; Multicultural; As offered)

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HIS478 Modern America, 1920-1989

HIS478 Modern America, 1920-1989

This course will trace the national experience from the post-WWI era through the fall of the Berlin Wall. By emphasizing changes in the nation’s modern political, cultural and social fabric, students will understand the history of the 20th Century. (3 units; Multicultural; As offered)

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European History Elective Requirement

Complete three (3) units of the following:

HIS333 Nineteenth Century Europe

HIS333 Nineteenth Century Europe

This course is a survey of European history from the French Revolution to World War I. The course focuses on the following themes of the long nineteenth century: nationalism and nation-building, industrialization and social change, Marxism and liberalization, colonialism and imperialism. Of particular importance is the growing tension between Christianity and secularization. (3 units; Multicultural; Fall even years)

  Course Sec Instructor Dates Days Time Location
Fall 2016 HIS333-A A Blincoe, Mark E. 09/06/2016 Monday, Wednesday, Friday 9:30 AM - 10:30 AM Yeager Center
B259
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HIS343 Twentieth Century Europe

HIS343 Twentieth Century Europe

This course is a survey of European History from the outbreak of World War I to the end of the Cold War. Special attention will be given to the study of conditions that produced Fascism, Nazism, and Communism, as well as to the factors that brought about World War II and shaped the development of the post-war world. (3 units; Spring odd years)

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HIS353 Renaissance & Reformation Europe

HIS353 Renaissance & Reformation Europe

This course is a survey of European history during the period of the Renaissance and the Reformation (ca. 1350-1600). Special attention will be given to the conditions influencing the development of Renaissance culture, such as the Black Death and Italian Humanism, as well as the religious and political changes prompted by Reformers like Martin Luther and John Calvin. (3 units; Fall odd years)

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HIS360 Enlightenment Europe

HIS360 Enlightenment Europe

This course is a survey of European history during the “Age of Absolutism,” from the Thirty Years War to the French Revolution (17th-18th centuries). This period is characterized by the development of royal absolutism, European colonialism, and the Enlightenment. The course focuses on key changes in European culture, including the growth of mercantilism, development of liberalism, and challenges to traditional political and religious authorities. (3 units; Spring even years)

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HIS363 History of England to 1688

HIS363 History of England to 1688

This course is a survey of English history from pre-Roman times to the Glorious Revolution in 1688. Special attention will be given to the political, religious and cultural changes produced by foreign conquest, Christian expansion, and the cross-Channel interests of the rulers of England. (3 units; Fall odd years)

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HIS373 History of England Since 1688

HIS373 History of England Since 1688

This course is a survey of English history since the Glorious Revolution in 1688. Special attention is given to political developments after the Glorious revolution, the expansion of British colonialism, industrialization and social change, religious movements within England and its colonies, and the impact of decolonization in the twentieth century. (3 units; Spring even years)

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HIS403 Special Topcs in European Hstry

HIS403 Special Topcs in European Hstry

Course concentrates on a specific topic in European History. May be repeated once with change in topic. (3 units; As offered)

  Course Sec Instructor Dates Days Time Location
Summer 2016 HIS403-A A Brook, Eric C 05/02/2016 Wednesday 6:00 PM - 7:00 PM James Complex
OFFC
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HIS435 Holocaust: Hist,Phil,Rel Prspctv

HIS435 Holocaust: Hist,Phil,Rel Prspctv

The course introduces the student to the extensive historiography covering the period of recent history and associated events cumulatively nominated the Holocaust/Shoah. It will provide opportunity for personal and in-depth analysis of some of the causes and consequences of this "war against the Jews." Items for study and reflection will include dramatic literary and film narratives, along with traditional historical analyses and documents. (3 units; Interdisciplinary; Multicultural; Spring even years)

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HIS436 Ethics After the Holocaust

HIS436 Ethics After the Holocaust

This course aims to introduce and explore the philosophical, social, historical, and theological aspects of ethical theory since the Holocaust. Specifically, after a brief historical introduction to contemporary philosophical and theological ethics, students will read and discuss a range of historical, philosophical and theological materials that deal with ethics during and after the Holocaust. The course will also address the contentious claim that the Holocaust actually seldom directly enters into such normative discourse, and so the class will then investigate the historical bases for that absence, with the aim of understanding and critiquing that claim. The course concludes with an investigation and discussion of forgiveness in the face of radical evil. (3 units; Fall even years)

  Course Sec Instructor Dates Days Time Location
Fall 2016 HIS436-A A Skubik, Daniel W. 09/06/2016 Tuesday, Thursday 12:15 PM - 1:45 PM Sch Business Building
103
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HIS437 StdsHlcstPrptrtr&VctmRscr&Bystnd

HIS437 StdsHlcstPrptrtr&VctmRscr&Bystnd

The Holocaust was not only an event involving nations and groups, and the focus on six million who were murdered is not merely a passing statistic. This course takes a finer-grained look at individuals who were involved in these atrocities. Some were perpetrators, ordering and obeying orders to kill; others were victims, the targets of these attacks. Others were bystanders, those who did not directly participate, but stood by and allowed the killing to take place, and in some instances directly or indirectly benefited from the killing. Still others, much fewer in number, risked their status, their property, their liberty and even their lives and the lives of their loved-ones, to rescue those who were targeted for killing. Why and how did people decide to occupy these roles? We will take a close look at representative figures in all these categories, seeking to understand their positions, and what those figures and their lives teach us about ourselves and our options in the midst of contemporary troubles. (3 units; Fall odd years)

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World History Elective Requirement

Complete three (3) units of the following:

HIS305 History of China

HIS305 History of China

The course acquaints and familiarizes students with historical inquiry centered upon the entire breadth of Chinese civilization. Students will engage in a study of the dynastic period to the Republican era with the advent of communism in China, focusing upon political, intellectual, economics and social factors. (3 units; Multicultural; Fall odd years)

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HIS315 Latin American History

HIS315 Latin American History

This course is a survey of Latin American history from the Spanish discovery of the Americas through the Cold War in the twentieth century. The course focuses on the impact of Spanish and Portuguese colonialism, the wars of Latin American Independence, the development of Latin American republics, and the impact of US intervention in the region. (3 units; Interdisciplinary; Multicultural; Fall/Spring)

  Course Sec Instructor Dates Days Time Location
Fall 2016 HIS315-A A Blincoe, Mark E. 09/06/2016 Tuesday, Thursday 8:45 AM - 10:15 AM James Complex
189
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HIS325 Non-Western Culture and History

HIS325 Non-Western Culture and History

The course consists of a historical survey exploring primarily the cultural and intellectual features of specifically non-Western cultures, with emphasis given to East Asia, South Asia, and the Middle East, additionally covering Africa, and the pre-Columbian Americas. (3 units; Interdisciplinary; Multicultural; Spring)

  Course Sec Instructor Dates Days Time Location
Fall 2016 HIS325-A A Brook, Eric C 09/06/2016 Monday, Wednesday, Friday 10:45 AM - 11:45 AM Yeager Center
B112
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HIS404 Special Topics in World History

HIS404 Special Topics in World History

Course concentrates on a specific topic in World History. May be repeated once with change in topic. (3 units; As offered)

  Course Sec Instructor Dates Days Time Location
Fall 2016 HIS404-A A Brook, Eric C 09/06/2016 Tuesday, Thursday 10:30 AM - 12:00 PM Yeager Center
B259
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HIS415 The Ancient World

HIS415 The Ancient World

Four great ancient civilizations are surveyed: Mesopotamian, Egyptian, Greek, and Roman. Special attention is given to the Christian and Greco-Roman origins of Western culture. (3 units; Interdisciplinary; Fall even years)

  Course Sec Instructor Dates Days Time Location
Fall 2016 HIS415-A A Brook, Eric C 09/06/2016 Monday, Wednesday, Friday 12:00 PM - 1:00 PM Yeager Center
B112
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HIS423 Medieval Civilization

HIS423 Medieval Civilization

This course is a survey of European history from the end of the Roman Empire to the emergence of the Renaissance. The course focuses on the creation of the Germanic kingdoms, the spread of Roman Christianity, and the development of Christendom. Special attention is given to the emergence of the institutional Church and its relationship with “feudal” Europe. (3 units; Spring odd years)

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HIS430 Cross and the Crescent

HIS430 Cross and the Crescent

This course traces the history of Christian-Muslim relations over the last fourteen centuries, from the rise of Islam in the early AD 7th century to the confrontations between Islamists and the secular West in the AD 21st century. The course surveys several primary and key secondary texts for understanding Islam and the varied relations between Islamic-and Christian-oriented societies over time. Topics examined in greater detail, include Muhammad and the beginnings and rise of Islam, Jesus and other Biblical figures in the Qur'an (Koran), cooperation and competition during the Middle Ages, the Crusades, and modern radical elements in Islam and Christianity. (3 units; Interdisciplinary; Multicultural; Fall odd years)

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Upper Division Elective Requirements**

Eighteen (18) additional upper division units in History*

*Students may also apply POL 423, POL 425, POL 427, POL 429, and POL 443 to the upper division history elective requirement.

**Students who double major in history and political science to meet single subject matter competency should refer to the social science single subject matter competency program requirements when selecting electives. See the Social Science Subject Matter Competence advisor, Dr. Eric Brook, for course requirement details

Optional Concentration in Holocaust Studies

(12 units)

HIS343 Twentieth Century Europe

HIS343 Twentieth Century Europe

This course is a survey of European History from the outbreak of World War I to the end of the Cold War. Special attention will be given to the study of conditions that produced Fascism, Nazism, and Communism, as well as to the factors that brought about World War II and shaped the development of the post-war world. (3 units; Spring odd years)

+

HIS435 Holocaust: Hist,Phil,Rel Prspctv

HIS435 Holocaust: Hist,Phil,Rel Prspctv

The course introduces the student to the extensive historiography covering the period of recent history and associated events cumulatively nominated the Holocaust/Shoah. It will provide opportunity for personal and in-depth analysis of some of the causes and consequences of this "war against the Jews." Items for study and reflection will include dramatic literary and film narratives, along with traditional historical analyses and documents. (3 units; Interdisciplinary; Multicultural; Spring even years)

+

HIS436 Ethics After the Holocaust

HIS436 Ethics After the Holocaust

This course aims to introduce and explore the philosophical, social, historical, and theological aspects of ethical theory since the Holocaust. Specifically, after a brief historical introduction to contemporary philosophical and theological ethics, students will read and discuss a range of historical, philosophical and theological materials that deal with ethics during and after the Holocaust. The course will also address the contentious claim that the Holocaust actually seldom directly enters into such normative discourse, and so the class will then investigate the historical bases for that absence, with the aim of understanding and critiquing that claim. The course concludes with an investigation and discussion of forgiveness in the face of radical evil. (3 units; Fall even years)

  Course Sec Instructor Dates Days Time Location
Fall 2016 HIS436-A A Skubik, Daniel W. 09/06/2016 Tuesday, Thursday 12:15 PM - 1:45 PM Sch Business Building
103
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HIS437 StdsHlcstPrptrtr&VctmRscr&Bystnd

HIS437 StdsHlcstPrptrtr&VctmRscr&Bystnd

The Holocaust was not only an event involving nations and groups, and the focus on six million who were murdered is not merely a passing statistic. This course takes a finer-grained look at individuals who were involved in these atrocities. Some were perpetrators, ordering and obeying orders to kill; others were victims, the targets of these attacks. Others were bystanders, those who did not directly participate, but stood by and allowed the killing to take place, and in some instances directly or indirectly benefited from the killing. Still others, much fewer in number, risked their status, their property, their liberty and even their lives and the lives of their loved-ones, to rescue those who were targeted for killing. Why and how did people decide to occupy these roles? We will take a close look at representative figures in all these categories, seeking to understand their positions, and what those figures and their lives teach us about ourselves and our options in the midst of contemporary troubles. (3 units; Fall odd years)

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